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10

The best thing to do is apply a thin layer of grease to the inside of the seat tube and the outside of the post (only the part of the post inside the seat tube needs grease) and set the seat height according to what fits you. The layer of grease will prevent the odd drip from causing rust. If the bike is stored in a dry place after riding in the rain it will ...


10

The only thing that can be done to save the frame is to have patches welded over the holes. You would need the expertise of a professional welder to get it done properly so that the frame is made structurally sound. Unfortunately, you may find that this repair is more expensive than simply finding a similar replacement bike or frame. The welding repair job ...


10

A roof is better than no roof, but not as good as an enclosed space because wind can blow through bring dust and dirt and moisture. Sunlight is also a source of slow continuous damage. For years I kept bikes under a carport that was also sheltered from the sun, and while they still rusted, it was much slower than if they were out in the weather. If safety ...


8

To be clear, I would not recommend riding that frame as-is. The clamps of the kickstand probably added rigidity, by removing it the bike will be weaker. If one or both chainstays part then handling will change abruptly, dropping the pedals and BB down toward the road and putting a lot of stress on the chainstays which will bend immediately. The chain ...


7

I agree with Daniel’s comment, I’ve had success with using vice grips to hold spikes myself. Be careful not to use excessive force to prevent crushing the spoke. It may help to add a small “flag” made of tape to each spoke to help visualize spoke vs nipple rotation. Matt’s suggestion of using penetrating oil and heat is a good idea, provided you removed the ...


7

Based on the photos you might not need any parts at all. The chain looks pretty awful, and is likely siezed up, but a good clean is required to see if it needs replacing. I've had some ugly chains that were perfectly functional. Brake pads is a common age item too - they get hard with age and braking performance suffers. But pad replacements are cheap and ...


6

Near as I can tell from the posted pictures you have Maillard CXC pedals. My guess is that you have the 500 model that can't be repaired. "Baldy" has an account on his blog of working on the model 500 version, sadly he does not say how he will remove the "swaged-in bearings": It turns out the bearings are 'swaged' in at the outer edge ...


6

To remove the fork the tapered spacer on the top need to be loosened. Tap the top of the fork (maybe a little harder than you have). Then push the fork back up into the seated position. This should allow some clearance between the tapered collar and the headset bearing. Removing the split tapered collar should make everything loose enough to disassemble. Lay ...


5

Summary You can ride it as is if you are okay with the risk, repair it with carbon fibre composite either yourself or get it done by a professional, or you can have a professional repair it by welding. Risk analysis of riding it as is: Has been like that for a long time and didn't break: That's really one of the strongest and easiest to verify arguments: ...


4

keep it outside most of the year If by keep it outside most of the year you mean that it will be stored outside but you will ride it and maintain it then outside storage is not as damaging. If by keep it outside most of the year you mean stored, rarely ridden (once a month or less) and not maintained then you will see damage. I've seen many bikes that were ...


4

I lived for a while in Lima, Peru, near the coast. The air is so humid that it causes fungus or rust in anything you leave unattended for a week or so. (Leather items in one week, plasticky fabrics in a month) In my case, the chain on my bikes had the same issue, they quickly developed rust, and if oiled too heavily, they got covered un dust in two or three ...


4

Much sooner than any corosion you will have problems from sand or other mud particles getting between the seatpost and the seattube and causing horrible clicking with every pedal stroke or when shifting your weight on the saddle. You can try applying the trick I employ, having myself big proplems with that even without any grooves. So far I used electrical ...


4

Another option is to cut a longer length of old inner tube, and put it over the seat post before mounting to bike. Then once the height is right, lower the "skirt" over the top of the clamp. Its not perfect on your bike because there's little "throat" above the clamp, so for you there will be minimal overlap. Sorry. Aside - your bike ...


3

Consider using rust converter before repainting the said area. From the picture, the rust doesn't look to be that bad since pinholes haven't formed and the surface is smooth. Sand the rusted area down and apply a bit of rust converter. For primer, you could use epoxy which works better and is a lot better for wet conditions. Polyurethane paint also works ...


3

It’s not bad, it’s cosmetic only. It’s just surface corrosion that’s got under the clear coat. Do you live in area where salt is used on the roads? Perhaps the previous owner was not good about cleaning under the bottom bracket shell. You can halt this by making sure to thoroughly clean the bike regularly and use something like WD40 in vulnerable area to ...


2

I don't know how to disassemble the axle to get access to the bearings. If there's no clear flats, or a 6 or 8 sided nut visible, then you might be looking at a one-time assembly. Try turning the rosette-end of the shaft visible in the photos, using needle nosed pliers. I suspect it won't do anything. However as a half-way option, try dropping some ...


2

You could use silicone caulk to seal up the grooves. You can probably find caulk in black which would blend in. You want caulk that’s designed for kitchens, bathrooms or exterior that seals and resists water.


2

What you have are "caged" bearings. Pull the cage out and rinse it in some sort of degreaser. Make sure all the bearing balls are intact -- if some are missing or appear damaged buy a complete new caged bearing assembly at a bike shop. Clean and inspect the "race" below the bearings -- make sure it's smooth. Regrease the bearings before ...


1

Edit: I've incorrectly supposed the way the galvanic corrosion between chrome moly steel and an aluminum alloy happens. I incorrectly thought both metals would be corroded, however, in galvanic corrosion it is the only one of the metals that is corroded because it acts as the sacrificial anode part of the circuit. In fact, the other metal is imbued with ...


1

A nice one is the use of with-vinegar for rust removal. Works quite nicely on bolts and rusted bits. Not personally tried, but some people reccomend the use of furnitre polish to wax your bike, to create a sort of a coat able to protect from water and moisture. WD40 to simply remove old stickers and "unknown" dirt on the bike frame.


1

Answering your numbered questions first: Will the rusty/blank spots be a functional problem down the line? A: Bare steel will rust. It needs to be covered in some way to prevent corrosion. Will power coating work well with the steel frame? A: Powder coating is an option that will work well on a steel frame. Here is a Sheldon Brown article that talks about ...


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