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34

Copied this from a saddle mfg website: How to measure your own sit bones Of course the measure you really want is between the centres of your ischial tuberosities – the pointy lower parts of your pelvic bone on either side. Many bike dealers have a pad that you can sit on to measure this distance, but you can do it at home too. Take a piece of aluminium ...


34

Padded seats tend to have more padding than used at any given time. This pushes the other 'extra' padding into the soft tissues. This causes numbness and discomfort over time. So slim hard seats are actually more comfortable over time, if they are the right size. You need to make sure your sit bones (ischial tuberosity) are well situated. The sit bones of ...


18

By breaking in your Brooks B17 etc. leather saddle, you create the "valleys" in the leather for your sitbones and the crotch area of the pelvis bone. Therefore you need enough time for the leather to deform at these three areas. There is various information on the net. My experience is that about 500km of riding (so about 25h at 20 km/h) gives a good enough ...


16

None of the above techniques worked for me. I made no impression on the corrugated cardboard and the foil just showed a nice big bum-print after sitting a few different surfaces. I came up with my own technique that's a bit more trial and error but seemed to work for me. I got two small erasers, put them on a chair, sat on them and moved them around until ...


15

Saddles can be very specific to the individual...but some general advice: Try to find a local bike shop that will let you test ride different saddles. Five minutes on a trainer is not enough, a good bike shop will let you take a saddle on a real ride. Talk with others that have similar biking style. A great mountain bike saddle does not always make a great ...


14

Putting the padding in the shorts means that the padding will always be exactly where you need it. Most people tend to change their position on the bike a bit, specially when riding longer tours. With the padded saddles, the padding won't change when you alter your position, which can result in blisters or sores.


14

Low seats provide clearance for more acrobatic body movements. This is essential for bunny hops and nearly every other trick which builds off of this skill. If you look at trials bikes they similarly have lots of clearance for the rider over the frame and the saddle. Since speeds are relatively low, and long distance riding is not the goal, pedaling ...


14

There is a lot of complete and utter non-sense around Brooks saddles. When it comes to saddles, everything works for somebody and nothing works for everybody. Rule #1. If it's not reasonably comfortable on Day 1, it will never be comfortable. Saddle comfort is about getting the right shape to match your backside, leather saddles like the Brooks will ...


13

The purpose of the channel in a bike saddle is to reduce pressure to the perineum, which can cause numbness and other long-term problems. This is a matter of both comfort and health, although not everyone is affected. Individual body type, saddle design, bike fit, and riding style work together to make saddle fit a very personal issue. On a related note, ...


12

In my experience (week long camping / bike touring trips), I have never thought "Man, I wish I had a chair." I have often thought, "I have packed way too much stuff." There are a few things to consider. You have looked into weight and cost, but there is also space and time considerations. Volume: Do you have space on your rack to put this? How small does ...


12

Almost all saddles will be exchangeable -- there are a few rare (and very expensive ones) you wouldn't encounter unless you were looking for them which can't be exchanged. So yes, almost surely if you buy a new saddle you can use it on another bike. Note that some saddles are marketed as "road" or "mtb" - the mtb ones are possibly more durable, but this ...


11

As a leather saddle wears out, it tends to sink and become softer in the middle while splaying out around the edges. This, naturally, makes the saddle uncomfortable and uneven. Lacing a saddle is a way to revive it and return it to its natural shape, or at least something close. You should lace your saddle if you find that it has become too soft. And ...


11

The rule of thumb of "the highest possible without wobbling the hips down to reach for pedals" seems like a better rule than "having the barefoot heel just touch the pedal with the leg completely straight when the pedal is completely down". If your saddle is at the right height, it should be difficult to place a foot on the ground while seated. Now that ...


11

The first ride gives almost everybody soreness. You should be using your sit bones with your saddle. You can roughly measure this at home. A too narrow or too wide saddle may give some pain (note this is not the same thing as soreness). Also, you may want to invest in padded bike shorts. Those help some people.


11

I seem to have "fixed" this problem by raising it some. However, that got me thinking... what would happen if I raised it even more so that my legs would be straight (not bent at the knee) when the pedal was at the bottom? Would this give me increased power? Would this give me increased power? Saddle height is a well known as an important factor for power ...


10

While it's true that your hips rocking indicates that the seat is too high, there is a different rule of thumb for knee pain related to the fore and aft position of the saddle. It's easy to remember: If your knee hurts in front, your seat is too far forward. If your knee hurts in the back, your seat is to far backward. The most important thing to remember ...


10

There is a lot of variation across models of saddles even if you stay within one genre (eg only consider road or only consider MTB). However, you'll find if you look at popular racing saddles that MTB saddles tend to be shorter. This is because in singletrack you're very frequently moving onto and off-of the saddle. A longer saddle might interfere with the "...


10

I ride a pro racer XL BMX. They are built for speed. I keep my seat down for 2 reasons. all my pedaling is done standing up -- power is everything for a racer. My saddle is made of one material only -- composite material -- its like sitting on a steel plate. I only use it to coast on and relax -- and that is only after the race. However, If I have ...


10

The best kind of saddle for touring is one which you find comfortable. The cut-out is intended to relieve pressure from your soft bits leaving most of your weight on your sit-bones. A very wide saddle might start to rub excessively inside your thigh on a long ride, while one with springs may be too bouncy at higher cadences and waste some of your effort. ...


10

The obvious answer would be to get some Cycling Jeans, i.e. jeans specifically designed for cycling in. These have reinforcement and stretch in the right places and often have other features such as deep pockets, a loop to carry a small lock and reflective strips. Levi, Rapha, Muxu and Swrve all make cycling jeans, so there's a fair amount of choice.


10

Most seat posts have a "minimum" insert of 3 to 4 inches. But this varies with the material and the thickness of the post, and the weight of the rider means the minimum might still be too little. As a tall rider I frequently have my seatposts up to maximum, and have bent several over time, and have fractured one frame. Now I always buy a 450 mm or 500 mm ...


10

Leather saddles start to sag unless you add tension due to the leather stretching over time. How much tension depends on your body weight and how slack the saddle has become. Try adding enough tension that the saddle feels somewhat taught, but you can still depress the center of the saddle a bit with your thumbs. Ride it then add adjust the tension 1/2 turn ...


10

I would suggest cutting off the extra threads. If you have access to a Dremel or similar tool it wouldn't be too difficult. Doing it with a hacksaw could be a real pain. Alternatively you could check your local hardware store for acorn nuts. The smooth ends should cover the threads which is likely doing the most of the damage.


9

Brooks recommends applying a layer of proofide to the bottom of the saddle. However, you should not wipe this layer off after it sets. Just leave it on, and it will protect the underside. Personally, I also recommend fenders for a bike that you plan to use frequently in the rain. This will also drastically reduce the amount of water that splashes up into ...


9

I know this is an old thread but it's the top one on Google and I found it helpful. I tried all the methods above and I didn't have a lot of luck so I wanted to share what I tried. I made some playdough using the first no cook recipe I found on Google (it was fun and doesn't take long). I then put it between two pieces of cling film and pressed it to about ...


9

I bought a bike last year and after a few rides, I found the saddle very painful. I resisted on riding it, assuming that I'll get used to it, but it never happened, and I was even concerned that I haven't got the right size of a bike. However I got a silicon gel saddle cover and since then the pain stopped. I didn't need cycling shorts or pants either. ...


9

I'd perhaps look at your saddle again. Padding isn't everything and there is a lot to be said for fit/sit bone width. Consider getting measured/fitted. I know what width fits me in the brand I buy. Personally, I think every serious cyclist should know their saddle size as well as their frame sizing. Keep in mind that all your riding up to this point (...


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