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1

It seems that from their photos, you have the correct setup. Structurally, it also makes sense as the longer rear of the clamp supports the part of the saddle that you'll sit on, though it would also make sense to rotate the top clamp to assign its beefier 'claw' to the front, which also undergoes a larger vertical cantilever force. If you want to be sure, ...


0

I'm surprised no one has raised the question of saddle width and shape yet. Did you get a saddle designed for women? A woman's saddle will have a wider rear to support the pelvic bones and also a shorter nose. Additionally -- for both genders -- it helps for the middle of the saddle (viewed from the rear) not to be very convex, as that puts more pressure on ...


2

There are a couple of factors that at least help you narrow your search. Sit-bone width. You can measure this at home, and lots of shops have special benches for measuring this, but the saddle should support you directly under your sit-bones (ischial tuberosities). Some manufacturers today produce a given saddle model in a number of widths to accommodate ...


1

As others state, you often have to try a lot of saddles to find one which is right for you. One way to do this is to buy a few recommended ones from eBay or similar second hand shopping site. If they look a bit scruffy it doesn't matter. If they don't work for you, resell on eBay, hopefully without losing much money besides postage. Once you have one which ...


0

I am 5 feet 8½ and I ride small frames. And even then the initial setup on my road bike was too long at first, I had to bring the shifters more upwards. But of course, what is small for some manufacturers may be medium for others, hard to say. Be sure to lower your seat enough so that you are not rocking to reach the pedals at all. Shorter reach handlebars ...


0

Besides the already sensible suggestions regarding fit and frame size, consider experimenting with saddles. A more expensive saddle is not necessarily a more comfortable one for you. It seems no one saddle is right for everyone. This is annoying as you have to try out several before you find one which works for you. You can spend a three figure sum on ...


2

I would say your saddle looks a bit too high, but that frame overall looks like a good fit. A smaller frame may have a shorter head-tube, lowering the bars even more! I also agree with the other answers that the length of the bike may be the problem. I think a slightly shorter stem, somewhere around 50mm would help, without changing the handling too much - ...


3

I am not convinced that the frame is too large. To me it looks like your saddle is too high, and trying to reach the pedals and handlebars from that position makes things awkward. Usually the saddle is set just so low that you don't fully extend your knees at the lowest position and don't extend your ankles at all. One rule of thumb is that you should be ...


1

There's a lot of saddle visible behind you - which indicates you're in an "attack" or forward position on the bike. To me it looks like you're going up a hill. For me, my saddle is much more "under" me - I've just tested and replicating that amount of saddle ledge out the back is extremely uncomfortable. The trailing edge of my saddle is almost still in ...


9

I think it's likely that the frame is just to large for you. A medium frame is generally too large for a person 5'4" (approx. 162cm) in height. What's going in is that distance from the saddle to the bars is likely too long, causing you to have to lean forward too much, which is causing your pelvis to rotate forwards also. When sitting on a bicycle ...


3

I have a 20" folder, long legs, and exactly the same problem. I strongly advise you to put the seatpost to the minimum insertion mark at least, if not further. I've personally cracked and broken my frame at the seat clamp, and fortunately it was weldable being steel. As for your parts - maybe. The combination of dimensions looks good, but the risk is ...


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