Hot answers tagged

51

Rims are worn out when the groove disappears. If the groove is clearly visible, well-defined and of uniform depth all the way around, the rim is not quite worn out and certainly not dangerous. New brake blocks will cause less wear as they will be free of hard particles of grit and metal that get embedded in the relatively soft rubber over time. Given the ...


38

It is really dangerous to follow a large vehicle closely. It is possible behind a directeur sportif in a passenger car which is smaller: you can see through it, and the driver is a cyclist who knows you and knows about you. You cannot see what is coming in front of the truck. If they choose to brake hard, watching the brake lights will be of no use; you ...


36

It may well become uncomfortable after pedalling for some time, so don't rely on a quick test ride to check. More importantly though, you need to be able to stop the bike based on the need to stop, and put your foot down without examining the ground for broken glass, thorns etc. It's not completely unknown to strike the sole of your shoe on the ground, like ...


29

Don't create the situation in the first place. Every large event I've ever been on would either have the roads closed down, or send the riders out in waves so as not to create a situation where a car would have to pass so many cyclists at once. Obviously the guy in the car was in the wrong, but there are still things that can be done to prevent the ...


26

16 km/h is so slow that even the worst tyres should keep you up, unless something like oil spills were involved. If something is so slippy that you fall without warning at such low speeds there is not much one could do. If you have a hunch this might happen tripodding corners or getting off the bike may help. The first drizzle after a long dry spell can ...


26

Leaving valuables on the bike sounds like a very bad idea. Bike luggage just isn't going to be robust enough to resist theft if left unattended, and the whole bike itself may be vulnerable to theft. What you want is a bag or caddy with a quick release so you can easily detach it and take it with you when you leave the bike. Many saddle bags have a quick ...


26

First, don't attempt a u-turn at a junction where you may have vehicles approaching from multiple directions and vehicle drivers will be expecting you to make a left or right turn, not a u-turn. U turn away at a point where you can see both directions clearly - away from blind turns and rises. Wait until vehicle have passed you to turn, If you need to get ...


16

In places where it rains very little or hasn't rained in a while and then a light rain falls, the water is not enough to "wash" the road surface; instead it only wets fine dust and oils that are on the surface. These oils come from cars' engines and exhausts, but are not noticeable at first sight. This mix turns into a fine, paste-like substance that is very ...


14

To fall to the inside of the turn means that the bottom of the wheel has slid to the outside. When that happens, it is really quick. I would look back at the corner and see if there's a metal plate in the roadway, which are terribly greasy when wet. Other possibilities include round grit/gravel/dust/sant that acts as a ball bearing, and oils on the ...


13

I'm not entirely sure about the relevant legislation. However, as the question contains "deutch" I'll give the situation for Germany plus an update about Switzerland. I'd expect a) the situation to be sufficiently similar across other European legislations for practical every-day use. Summary: IMHO everyone misbehaved: Car driver, OP, and in Germany also ...


11

Nope - no way no how and never would I ride without shoes. Sunburn I live not-far from a large hole in the ozone layer, and the sun can be brutal. As a child I once wore Jandals (thongs/flipflops) to a beach carnival and suffered severe sunburn on my feet, and that was through sunblock. Damage I've never damaged my feet in an accident, probably cos I wear ...


10

Context about OP's ride: There was a climate demonstration in Switzerland and people organized to ride there in groups, over large distances. So it was very much like a critical mass, but as a one off thing, it appears the seasoned regulars were missing who usually make sure everyone stays safe. Blocking traffic wasn't the goal and even less of a welcomed ...


10

In addition to the previous answers, your tire pressure was likely too high for the conditions. If you know you're going to be riding in the rain, it's usually a good idea to lower your tire pressure from what you would normally have them at in dry conditions. A lower tire pressure allows the tire contact patch to deform more, thereby increasing the amount ...


9

1 Avoid obstacles There's not too much you can do about this. That school almost next to your home means you'll always be stuck in student-rush hour no matter what you do. Except maybe if you can go around the school area in a relatively small detour. Cycling on a quiet parallel road may be well worth the extra few 100 meters. 2 Be noticeable Wear high ...


9

If it were mine I wouldn't ride. It appears there is a crack connecting the two holes. This would indicate there has been enough flex to cause the frame to crack.


9

The other answers have good notes about doing this more safely. But if the car is far enough behind you and you are sure there is no risk, just signal a right turn. Your path will be almost the same, and the reaction needed from the driver is the same (increased awareness, possibly need to slow down). I myself would only do this if the distance was so large ...


8

I once tried to cycle behind a truck out of sheer exhaustion and curiousness to see what it feels like doing that. It was easy at first since all you had to do was wait downhill for a truck to come by. I had seen other cyclist do it and others even hold onto the back of the truck and get pulled by the truck uphill. So for my case I just wanted the truck to ...


7

I'm both a cyclist and a motorist, so I know this situation from both sides, I suppose. In my experience, these situations can be avoided, if people are willing to be reasonable - once you move into the legalities of the matter, you have in effect lost the more important perspective, namely that all road users should be able to go about their lawful business ...


7

I'm surprised to see that no one else mentioned it, and this isn't a terribly detailed answer, but that road has what motorcyclists refer to as the dreaded "tar snakes". The tar they use to patch cracks ends up very smooth, and depending on weather conditions can get polished even more by traffic. Especially in wet conditions, that thin line of tar can be ...


7

safely locked to the frame, and I can simply leave it there. Summary To answer your question about the existence of locking bags - they are out there. As an example (not a recommendation) Ortlieb makes a handlebar mount and bags that can be locked to the mount. No locking bag system is secure. Best Option A handlebar bag with a quick release mount ...


7

This is called "Draughting" or "Drafting" depending on your locale, when done as described. If done on a track it can be motor-pacing or similar. There are even world speed records for bikes that are shielded behind a vehicle. Like anything in cycling, safety is relative. You can choose to ride behind a large solid vehicle, knowing that: This may be ...


7

This is an immensely dangerous practice. The kinetic energy of the smallest car is easily capable of killing a human. A truck would be able to instantly kill a cyclist even at a crawl, let alone at higher speeds. Many cycle deaths in London have been due to cyclists being too close trucks. Truck drivers do not always have the best visibility around the truck ...


6

There are many factors that go into determining the performance of a tyre. The material and thread count (TPI) of the carcass, the rubber compound, thickness and tread pattern. Tubed vs tubeless, and many different varieties of puncture protection layers. Unfortunately as a consumer (especially with lesser known brands) its virtually impossible to be sure ...


6

I haven't tried doing a week long trip barefoot, but for everyday life I mostly go barefoot in summer+. I have done it enough to be sure that it won't become uncomfortable with time and the main reason I use shoes on longer tours is because I like to use clipless shoes/pedals for performance. Make sure that your pedals are really suitable for this. In my ...


6

First off, it's untrue that smooth tires are best in the rain. In spite of what Sheldon said, a tire with some tread will provide a better grip on a wet surface. But regardless of that, you can slightly reduce your chance of skidding on a curve by leaning OUT on the turn. Basically, keep your bike as upright as you reasonably can. This isn't as sexy as ...


6

This is a major reason for me to wear bike jerseys for commuting - all those things go in my back pockets. (Ideally) zipped trouser pockets are another option, though jeans pockets are usually secure enough against things falling out. A belt bag (either bike specific or otherwise) is preferable in many ways to a backpack or shoulder bag. It doesn't swing ...


6

I think the legal way is to get off your bike before reaching the cross street, (about where your arrow is,) cross walking, and get on your bike again. The signal you need in that case is a hand up and down, on the side of the pavement (side walk) where you will stop. But this signal is gone out of fashion in many countries. What you want to do might be ...


5

My usual summer solution is sandals. The more open, the better the air circulation. I would not ride bare feet on a cycle where I may have to put my foot on the ground unexpectedly. I have been bare feet on a delta trike which is very stable. And then only in low traffic areas, where I am familiar with the roads. And even then I have easy to slip on ...


5

I like to share my solution for modifying the brakes on a bike for riders who were born with one hand/arm or are amputees. I was born missing four fingers on my left hand. For many years I was running two brake leavers on the right side. Even though it worked, I always found this solution somewhat inelegant from an engineering point of view. I recently got ...


5

I'd reuse that spindle. The tips bear the smallest load. A nick near the center of the spindle would be more significant


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