Hot answers tagged

42

This is an interesting and thoughtful question, and just the fact that you are thinking carefully about how other road users think about you is very valuable and will contribute to your safety on the road. Your question makes a lot of sense. How do you indicate to drivers that you need and deserve their consideration and patience, especially when you have ...


40

As an experienced cyclist who has been all over the country and even done hundreds of miles on interstates, after finding that location on Google Maps, and checking how you might conceivably get there, there is absolutely no way in hell I would ever be caught dead there on a bicycle. How you answer this question is not by taking one isolated photo out of ...


37

It is really dangerous to follow a large vehicle closely. It is possible behind a directeur sportif in a passenger car which is smaller: you can see through it, and the driver is a cyclist who knows you and knows about you. You cannot see what is coming in front of the truck. If they choose to brake hard, watching the brake lights will be of no use; you have ...


26

First, don't attempt a u-turn at a junction where you may have vehicles approaching from multiple directions and vehicle drivers will be expecting you to make a left or right turn, not a u-turn. U turn away at a point where you can see both directions clearly - away from blind turns and rises. Wait until vehicle have passed you to turn, If you need to get ...


26

I ride successfully along some roads with a posted speed of 100 km/h (65 mph) and there are other roads posted at 50 km/h (35 mph) that I avoid. The difference is in the shoulder and general condition of the shoulder. In your photo there IS a paved shoulder, compared to some of my roads where the seal stops at the white painted line. However there's nowhere ...


23

In my opinion it is actually safer to bring the setup you are used to even if it theoretically might be less optimal on the other side of the road. Such a difference is very small. Sometimes you have to indicate to the left and sometimes to the right anyway. When I lived in the UK for 2 years I had problems getting used to the reversed brakes and I was more ...


19

Cars drivers are not going to give you any breaks because you are new at cycling, so you need to learn how to not be a newbie. If you have trouble controlling the bike you need to go somewhere safe and practice. Ride on grass if you think you may fall off. Practice stopping. starting, signaling, taking either hand off the bars to signal, looking over you ...


18

Around here the most highly-correlated sign of a new cyclist is a high-visibility vest: They're not expensive (a search on Amazon UK pulls up several under £5), lightweight enough to not be hugely uncomfortable in the summer, and loose enough to go over a light jacket in cooler weather.


18

It's not easy. A few factors make it harder. The double yellow lines don't extend vary far up Chipperfield Road (for those not in the UK, they mean "no parking"). Cars can come up too quickly for the conditions, and taxi drivers are notoriously impatient, as well as likely to pass too close without slowing down. Seeing a hazard rolling out of ...


17

This would be fine: There's a shoulder, you can ride on it (if it's legal) and speed limit is pretty low. Not the most pleasant place to ride, but it's okay. However I would advise against it, because the part where you get run over by a bus is not shown in the picture. You say you're "thinking about bike commuting" which hints you're not used to ...


14

Yes, extremely dangerous, as evidenced by your falling over the handlebars It's evident from the photograph you linked, that the fork is pushed backwards, bringing the wheel much too close to the frame. The most likely reason for this would be crash damage, given that the fork is facing the right way. There are two hazards then, one is locking the front ...


13

I am British living in Spain, and I ride my British bike here, so have some experience. I agree with others that you are probably best advised to ride the bike you are used to. If there are any regulations, I have not seen any signs of their enforcement in over 10 years of cycling here. I just wanted to add that the hardest things to master are looking over ...


12

That's a good question, and is great that you are taking the time to think about these issues. You have stated your goals clearly, so I am going to address those rather than your specific questions, since, as I will try to explain, I don't think your goals are best met in the way you are now imagining. You say you want Motorists being a bit more cautious ...


11

The light is better on your handlebars or fork than on your frame - the frame lags and always points at some tangent to where you're going while turning, so either you need a really wide beam, or you have to ride into the dark. Fortunately there are solutions, and some of them are pretty vintage. Steerer mount. In the days of threaded headsets, there was ...


11

Based on the photo - the fork is utterly dead and shouldn't be ridden. The frame may have stresses/subtle bends about 2-3" / 50-75mm aft of the headtube on the top and down tubes, and should be checked closely. Being a steel frame helps, but I'd absolutely retire the fork and heatset+bearings. The front wheel (rim/spokes/hub) needs a good check as ...


11

I will be the suspicious person, and I will wander a bit off-topic. No offense intended, I will only describe a worst-case scenario. I make one assumption: did you buy it second-hand because the price was a very good one (given the general condition you could see from the picture)? The bike was very clean: recently bought? that would explain it. cleaned ...


11

For Oahu specifically, Hawaii Department of Transportation publishes the "Bike Map Oahu" which outlines bicycle routes around the island. They classify the routes into "Novice friendly", "Experienced", and "Not Bicycle Friendly". I see that there is a "Nimitz Bike Path" that runs parallel to the Nimitz ...


10

There is really not much you can do except taking it slowly and carefully looking around. Parked vehicles (especially high ones like trucks, vans and SUVs) at intersections are always a problem and risk. At least here in Austria one mustn’t park within 5m of the edge of intersecting roads but this law is often violated. A few things which can help slightly: ...


9

The other answers have good notes about doing this more safely. But if the car is far enough behind you and you are sure there is no risk, just signal a right turn. Your path will be almost the same, and the reaction needed from the driver is the same (increased awareness, possibly need to slow down). I myself would only do this if the distance was so large ...


8

I once tried to cycle behind a truck out of sheer exhaustion and curiousness to see what it feels like doing that. It was easy at first since all you had to do was wait downhill for a truck to come by. I had seen other cyclist do it and others even hold onto the back of the truck and get pulled by the truck uphill. So for my case I just wanted the truck to ...


8

This is called "Draughting" or "Drafting" depending on your locale, when done as described. If done on a track it can be motor-pacing or similar. There are even world speed records for bikes that are shielded behind a vehicle. Like anything in cycling, safety is relative. You can choose to ride behind a large solid vehicle, knowing that: This may be ...


7

To add to the other excellent answers: Be predictable, proactive, and be visible I am a cyclist in a largish French city (Versailles), I also drive a car - and looking at cyclists from the perspective of a driver is what made me change my behaviour. Predictability: make sure that what you do is expected by the drivers, even if it means thinking way ahead. ...


7

In The Netherlands kids have an orange flag attached to their bike making the young, vulnerable (and inexperienced) biker more noticeable and signaling that the there's a vulnerable road user present: (Sorry, I couldn't find another photo of the flag so I used this photo of a kid. No offence meant w.r.t. your biking abilities) The flag "pole" is ...


6

I cycle with one hand. I’ve got hydraulic brakes, and I’ve put a hydraulic splitter inline. It takes both brakes in & a single line out & then into a single Juicy brake controller. The splitter came from a quad bike setup. I don’t find any problem with bias, nor any problems with not having enough brake fluid to shift both callipers. For gears I ...


6

I think the legal way is to get off your bike before reaching the cross street, (about where your arrow is,) cross walking, and get on your bike again. The signal you need in that case is a hand up and down, on the side of the pavement (side walk) where you will stop. But this signal is gone out of fashion in many countries. What you want to do might be ...


6

This is an immensely dangerous practice. The kinetic energy of the smallest car is easily capable of killing a human. A truck would be able to instantly kill a cyclist even at a crawl, let alone at higher speeds. Many cycle deaths in London have been due to cyclists being too close trucks. Truck drivers do not always have the best visibility around the truck ...


6

You don't have to do any of these things to commute. If you value safety over speed I'd recommend a more upright bike (Dutch style) which helps improve visibility and makes it easier to look around. They also allow you to ride in the clothes you want to wear at your destination. What you call old-school is current every-day practice in a lot of Europe. You ...


6

Get the junction improved! You already have some good answers for dealing with it "there and then", below is a parallel, long-term solution. Write to: the council (the borough council in London, might be called city or district council etc elsewhere) your MP (I believe you can even if you can't vote in parliamentary elections), just look up the ...


6

Here are my thoughts: It depends is the safest answer. You have to be comfortable on the road protecting your space, and being able to safely ride. Some people struggle to stay calm when cars pass them and that in turn makes them unable to focus on riding safely. In the picture you post, I would ride that in the shoulder if I was going slower than 15 MPH. ...


6

A spring, of course, is just a piece of wire. When you bend a spring, you're just bending a piece of wire. In a perfect world, the wire would bend evenly along it's entire (coiled) length. In the real world, particularly during sharp or extreme bends it's possible for the wire to kink. Either way, the kink becomes a weak spot and as with all metals when you ...


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