New answers tagged

7

In places where it rains very little or hasn't rained in a while and then a light rain falls, the water is not enough to "wash" the road surface; instead it only wets fine dust and oils that are on the surface. These oils come from cars' engines and exhausts, but are not noticeable at first sight. This mix turns into a fine, paste-like substance that is very ...


9

In addition to the previous answers, your tire pressure was likely too high for the conditions. If you know you're going to be riding in the rain, it's usually a good idea to lower your tire pressure from what you would normally have them at in dry conditions. A lower tire pressure allows the tire contact patch to deform more, thereby increasing the amount ...


5

First off, it's untrue that smooth tires are best in the rain. In spite of what Sheldon said, a tire with some tread will provide a better grip on a wet surface. But regardless of that, you can slightly reduce your chance of skidding on a curve by leaning OUT on the turn. Basically, keep your bike as upright as you reasonably can. This isn't as sexy as ...


13

To fall to the inside of the turn means that the bottom of the wheel has slid to the outside. When that happens, it is really quick. I would look back at the corner and see if there's a metal plate in the roadway, which are terribly greasy when wet. Other possibilities include round grit/gravel/dust/sant that acts as a ball bearing, and oils on the ...


23

16 km/h is so slow that even the worst tyres should keep you up, unless something like oil spills were involved. If something is so slippy that you fall without warning at such low speeds there is not much one could do. If you have a hunch this might happen tripodding corners or getting off the bike may help. The first drizzle after a long dry spell can ...


5

Perhaps it could be due to the type of asphalt, I know there is Open-graded friction course (OGFC) (very porous asphalt with a lot of air gaps in it) which is much better at draining the water that falls on its surface, perhaps the asphalt you were riding on was not of this porous type causing more water to accumulate on the surface. However I am quite sure ...


1

Let me attempt to go just slightly further than the other answers so far. My ability to explain this well may be limited by the fact that I'm not an engineer. I'd welcome any corrections. Fatigue-related lifetimes This section details frame life in relation to fatigue, i.e. after repeaated normal use without crashes or damage. Conventional wisdom is that ...


0

As student I used a step-through brazed steel frame which was >30 years old. So, that bike had a particularly weak frame geometry. Its beginnings are unknown to me - my dad bought it used at some point. He then used it for recreational purposes, so not that much distance but forest paths plus some load (kid on back seat). At some point I inherited it as a ...


1

I think the only real reason why you shouldn't remove them is that if you're moving the whole thing (without anyone on it) and it violently crashes against itself (say you pick it up to store it and it slips) then the safetly tabs will take the damaage and potentially save the rest of it. Apart from a case like that, if you're safe with how you use it, the ...


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