11

My conclusion after many years of using not two, but three types of valves is that the best is the one that results most practical for you, acording to type of riding, type of pumping methods available and of course the type of bike/tire/rims you are using. Neither valve type is absolutely better than other, but one of them may result better for your ...


10

"THREAD-ON SCHRADER CHUCK" yields good search results


8

Your valve has slipped partially inside the hole in the rim where it exits. Normally it's on average about 1-1/2" outside the hole. You'll need to inspect the valve body to see if it's cut. You can't put a pump on it because the main body of the valve is stuck. First fix the valve body position, then inspect... Here's how to fix: Deflate the tire about 90%. ...


7

Short answer, it's not common at all and probably wasn't like that when the bike was new. The valve that you need is determined by the rim rather than the bike. If the rim is drilled out with a big enough hole for a schrader valve, then that's what you should use. If a schrader valve doesn't fit through the valve hole, then you should use a tube with ...


7

I haven't come across this before but it's not right. It sounds like the valve coating is coming unstuck from the metal part of the valve. If that fails it would be quite likely to fail suddenly which could be painful. Time for a new tube


7

Much of the drop you see will be due to the reconnection, not the disconnection. When you disconnect the pump you have 120psi in the tyre and the hose, gauge and a little bit of pump. This immediately drops to zero (as these are all gauge pressures). Most of the hissing you hear is this air leaving the system When you reconnect the 0 psi in the hose ...


7

With MTB tires, there's really no issue in drilling out the valve hole to a larger size since the rims are so wide to begin with. You can do it yourself with a drill bit (3/8" or 10mm) or have your LBS do it. Sanding or reaming the hole afterwards is important, as well as making sure there aren't any sharp metal bits floating around afterwards that might ...


6

Assuming the issue is getting the pump head to lock on the valve. Your tube has shifted and now the valve looks really short. You'll have to deflate the tube completely and move the tire around to wiggle it valve to a straight position. The pump should lock on to the valve without a problem once it sticks out far enough.


6

Buy a floor pump, also known as a track pump, instead of an automotive accessory. A track pump will take about the same time to top up your tires as a small car compressor, and has an advantage of not needing electricity at all. You still need the on-bike pump for punctures while riding, but in the garage at home a track pump works very well. I ended up ...


6

You have a Schrader valve. The pin on the valve core has been bent or the core is cross threaded in the stem - the picture is a little blurry. You can remove the core by unscrewing it from the stem. There is a special tool for that, sometimes skinny needle nose pliers can be used. Here are the options I can think of: If the pin is bent or the threads on the ...


6

I think you are correct; there is no technical advantage of Presta. But many things are not used for technical reasons but rather for momentum reasons. Personally I prefer schrader for all my bikes, including my tubeless tires. Any rims drilled for Presta, I simply drill out. I only have presta valves on a couple very narrow rims which I would rather not ...


5

The cheapest solution is to try and remove the burrs or sharp edges that are cutting the tube. This can be done with a small file or a piece of emery cloth cut into a small strip and pushed through the hole. If the rim is double walled it will be difficult to get at the inner edges. The alternative is to purchase a set of schrader to presta adapter sleeves. ...


5

Sounds like the valve has stuck shut, this can happen if the rubber seal at the base of the valve swells up. If the valve core is replaceable just get the appropriate valve tool and a replacement core, both are really cheap. Otherwise its likely to require a replacement tube.


5

I have a Topeak "Road Morph" mini pump on my bike, and the pressure gauge on that is at best a distraction. The display is a bit of plastic sliding in a tube, so there's a lot of friction and that makes the pressure reading unreliable. It can stick anywhere, but usually it reads low, like yours does. That makes it useless for anything other than "is there ...


5

Just use one of these as a valve cap. You can probably remove the dodgy core with it, and either bend it straight or replace with one from a spare tube.


5

Presta (btw: we call it Sclaverand or simply road bike valve here in Austria) has one advantage: You can easily release air. There could also be some small weight savings and aerodynamic benefits. I also think dirt is less of a problem with Presta (assuming you use both without a valve cap). Even if rims have gotten wide enough to drill holes for both valves:...


4

I know it's normal to lose a bit of air when getting the pump off but I'm not sure about this The air you lose when taking the pump off should be just a very brief hiss. And, actually, it's mostly air coming out of the pump, not out of the tyre. You shouldn't lose any significant amount of pressure when taking the pump off. The only thing I can think of to ...


4

Why not? The bike will roll anyway. You would need two pump heads or an adapter to pump both tires, but other than that, it will work just fine.


4

I have one of such compressors for car use and of course I have used it on my bikes. However, I only use it on MTB bikes which I inflate to 40 psi at most. I Do not own a road bike but some slick tires sometimes inflated up to 60 PSI. For MTB tires the compressor is slow enough to allow very accurate pressure control. The problem I have faced is that as ...


4

In my experience, when a Schrader valve starts leaking suddenly, the most common reason is that there is a small piece of debris that prevents the valve from closing. The easiest way to remove them is to slightly overinflate the tire, then fully open the valve by pressing the center pin. If this does not help, the valve might be faulty and the tube should be ...


4

The type of damage shown is often due to under inflation or not centering the valve stem in the hole. When under inflated the tube doesn't exert enough pressure on the tire bead. This allows the tire to spin on the rim. That in turn causes the tube to shift pulling it at an angle and chaffing the valve stem.


4

It looks like the valve core is missing. If it is just bent, then I cannot see it in the picture. If it is indeed missing, then it might have been unscrewed and then it popped out due to the pressure and jumped somewhere. If it is there, you can unscrew the core follow as if it was missing. You can buy a new valve core (photo https://commons.wikimedia.org/...


4

Never seen one myself - there are pumps that have push-on "speed" adapters for presta, but they are part of the pump head and you wouldn't find one at the service station. The best fix is to unscrew your valve core and add a small dab of hand-strength threadlocker. The Locktite one is normally blue, but other brands have other colours. Then ...


4

SKS makes a press-on adapter. Unscrew the valve nut, push the adapter on, use the schraeder head on the air hose, pull the adapter off and thread the valve nut back down. Tell your shop it's p/n PU4001 from Q.


3

A Schrader valve has an external width of 7.7mm per the specification. The number written on your valve refers to this fact. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schrader_valve#Dimensions


3

Try covering the hole from the inside with gorilla tape and opening the hole back up with an x cut pattern like you would with ghetto tubeless.


3

Actually, correct drill bit size is 21/64", not 3/8" http://sheldonbrown.com/gloss_sa-o.html - search for Schrader


3

Tubes may be cheap, but good luck filling a presta valve when you are on the road in the USA. NO gas station has presta chucks. And if you are living in the USA, it's a 3/8 inch drill bit to convert to schrader valve. I have yet to see anyone have a wheel collapse due to converting to schrader valves. The bike shops warn against it because they gotta sell ...


3

I had a Slime bike tube that leaked into the Schrader valve and really gummed up everything to where no air would release. After removing the valve, no air was escaping so a solid clog for sure in the valve or tube. I replaced the valve with a cheap kit from Wal-Mart ($2.96) and still no success until I attacked the problem by inflating and blowing the &...


3

My current pump (a floor pump) clamps onto the valve with a clamp instead of threading it on. I can very quickly release it. This could be at the expense of not being able to pump it to 120 PSI (which I don't need). It may be possible to adjust the pin in the business end of the pump so that it stops pressing on your valve sooner when you unscrew it; that ...


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