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22

I've seen that color before. If you are filling from a compressed air tank, make sure the tank has been bled recently. More frequently in humid areas air tanks will get condensation inside. Normal maintenance is to bled the water out of the tank. The condensation rusts the inside of the tank and can eventually cause tank failure. When you put an air line on ...


21

You are correct that the type of puncture you're getting is caused by the rim "pinching" the inner tube. The root cause here is one of the following: pressure too low (most likely) You're not avoiding potholes carefully enough Weight is too high for the tires/terrain. This has nothing to do with fixies except perhaps that people on fixies tend to ...


12

Pull the valve core and poke a 2mm Allen wrench down to test the fluid level with the valve at the 6 o'clock position with the tire off the ground. You want "some" free liquid. How much depends on the tire size but I usually look for at least 3mm. Some amount of sealant from a new installation goes to coating the tire and in many cases filling in the ...


11

I've been waiting until I had enough time to give this a proper answer, because the answer to the question in the title is "it depends" and it's a very important "it depends." It runs the gamut from yes to absolutely not. I want to cover road bike tires here as well, as I don't want folks making the jump from "it's ok for mountain bikes" to "it's ok for road ...


11

At minimum, you should replace the sealant every 6 months or so. As you have found, a good tubeless setup will stay inflated well beyond that time, as the latex in the sealant has already sealed any small holes. However, the sealant does dry over time, so the systems ability to self-repair when you run over a thorn or sharp rock is greatly reduced. There ...


9

You're really asking two questions here: 1) Do road tires lose air more quickly? And 2) Do tubeless tires lose air more quickly? First off, let's talk about the different ways that tires can (and do) lose pressure. Obviously, they can lose pressure through a poor seal, either on the valve or where the tire seats to the rim on tubeless tires. Tires also ...


9

I know there are a few answers here but they don't address the tonus solid or tubless. Here is you problem: I don't know exactly the amount of pressure, but always that I inflate the tires, are really "tight" you could say. "Tight" is not good enough. Check pressure without a gauge. Get a real pressure gauge. They are not expensive and inflate ...


9

I always save the core out of blown tubes and have never had them not compatible. At the bike store you just see one jar. Might someone come out with non-standard - it could happen.


8

Air will escape, one of the biggest problems with Ghetto tubeless (unfortunate, but long established name for this technique) and not using specific tubeless ready or UST (tubeless standard) tires is that you need to inflate your tires a lot. At worst for every ride. The tires often do roll off the rim. Not every combination of Ghetto tubeless will work (the ...


8

Sorry to revive an old thread, but I have the same wheelset. At first, I was losing up to half the pressure withing 12 hours. I started with 1 ounce of sealant in each tire. After a week, I added another ounce, and the tires lost maybe the same amount over a 24 hour period. Not bad, that is the rate for my latex tubulars But lately, the front tire is now ...


8

I spoke with the bike's previous owner, and he confirmed that the tyre was never filled from a compressor, always used a floor pump or a minipump which takes air from the atmosphere, so little chance that water went in via the pump. The tube was a self-sealing CST tube, worth around double the cost of a normal tube. The brown poop liquid IS the sealant ...


7

Use a valve core tool to remove the core of the valve, and then clean it using a light solvent. It should be only a few minutes work. If there is a lump in the flat tire, the slime may have hardened, and the tube may need to be replaced, either way. Hope that helps.


7

Pro's: May be a quick roadside fix. May be able to fix without removing tyre. May last a long time. May offer protection against a second puncture in the same wheel. Con's: Expensive for a puncture. Bulky and heavy. Only one can per tyre. Wouldn't be suitable for some punctures and would be a waste if you didn't realise this. This fix may work for a ...


7

I wouldn't go for tubeless as a first attempt to solve the problem. Tubeless might be a good solution for skinny racing bike tyres, which are rather prone to puncturing. But you really shouldn't be having much of a problem with punctures on a hybrid bike with 32C tyres. Tubeless usually requires new tyres. If you're going to buy new tyres, there are ...


6

Road tires have higher pressure with lower volume, and both of those properties are going to cause them to lose air more quickly than a lower pressure, higher volume tire, tubeless or not. With that in mind, it may be the case that the tire needs a little more sealant. The stuff has to squeeze around not only throughout the casing of the tire, but also ...


6

You might want to remove your Schrader valve's stem (innards) with a stem removal tool and check the valve's rubber seat, located on the part that you remove. There may be debris lodged in the valve seat such as grit or sand or some dried slime that would cause it not to seat and seal properly. Also consider switching the valve stem core from another valve ...


6

Are you having problems with flats too frequently for comfort? If not, leave them alone. If you are, whats causing the flats? Punctures? Too low tire pressure? If its the latter, sealant won't help. But, people do put Stans sealant into tubes to do the same purpose like Slime to deal with punctures. It comes with the usual caveats just like Slime (...


6

Have a close look. On a presta valve there is a wide threaded part that the lock ring attaches to. And a narrower part with the valve lock nut above it that the cap threads onto. If the narrow part has two flat sides to get a tool onto, then it's removable.


6

You should be able to disassemble the pump head and clean out the blockage manually. I’d try 70% isopropyl alcohol as a solvent to help remove sealant.


6

Latex based sealants are great at fixing the sort of small holes that you'll get from thorns and glass. If the hole is too big, then all of the sealant will just rush out with the air in your tube. Pinch flats tend to make a big enough gash in the tube that sealant is useless. People will often talk about using sealant to avoid pinch flats because they're ...


6

Depends on your confidence levels - if you're going for a 3 hour tour then its a very long walk home. For a 5 minute roll to the local shops, a walk would merely be annoying. Topping up sealant is normal, and should be done every ~6 months anyway. As long as you have the same stuff, I'd consider it. First try to ascertain how much is left in the tyre, ...


5

Yes, you surely can use standard tyres with tubeless rims. I do so and it's ok. But you can expirience some problems (from my own experience and what I saw): As you already wrote, you cannot run on (very) low pressure; You can get a "snake bite" puncture relatively easy because of thin sidewalls (from my own experience - low pressure, hit a curbstone, get ...


5

I have no way of knowing if this will work with Slime but I have done something similar in industrial applications. You will need a "T" fitting and two shutoff valves. Install the valves on to the "T",one on the bottom port of the "T" and the other to a side port. Install the side port valve on the Slime hose as close to the pump as possible. Connect the ...


5

There is more to tire set-up than just puncture proof. Many are also interested in tire suppleness, traction and rolling resistance. Tubeless tires are the in thing at the moment because tubeless construction take material away (aka the the tube) and allows lower pressures, which results in a more supple tire, that has more traction and often less rolling ...


5

The advice I can give is Buy a good pair of tires. I use Maxxis Re-Fuse and can't complain at all, they are pretty strong and not expensive (they aren't cheap though), I've ride them literally over broken bottle shards and survived. Some friends of mine have Black Mamba tires and they seem to be happy. Keep you tire with the correct pressure. I usually ride ...


5

Is this just because I haven't got around to adding sealant yet...? Yup. The sealant plugs the very small air leaks in the casing and between the rim and bead. The tire will leak down substantially faster without it. Despite the fact that it's not the subject at hand, it's worth reinforcing what brendan said: make sure you're running tubeless specific ...


5

If you've only done 100 km on it, its under warranty so take it back. Sealant may fix it for now, but a weld shouldn't leak air, so its a weak spot on the rim.


5

It depends. If you have regular tube tires and the sealant was something like Slime, then in theory you don't have to put more in unless you have a flat. In reality, Slime thickens over time. You can't really add more, so you might expect to change tubes every couple years. Riding your bike regularly will help prevent the Slime from coagulating in one spot ...


4

Slime is lighter and conveniently pre-applied in the convenience of you own own home/garage. Slime tube sealant As for can the tube be repaired? The PedalPower can says temporary but not exactly sure what that means. As for Sime if it seals a small puncture I just stay with Slime only. If it is a larger puncture it might be too big to repair period. I ...


4

I would try buying a set of 28mm tires (or larger). You can run them at a lower pressure than a 23mm or 25mm and doing so won't likely cause the bite puncture you are experiencing b/c the air chamber is much larger and thus has more area to compress before it nips at the tube. An upside is that the ride quality is far superior to say, a 23mm. Also, make ...


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