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12

They use a tiny MEMS gyroscope to measure RPM. These are solid state devices that can measure axial rotation so it can count how many rotations per minute the bike’s axle is rotating. The actual structure of the MEMS gyro is quite interesting (and different from a MEMS accelerometer)- there’s a good description on Wikipedia. Because the gyro is measuring ...


7

A 'bike computer' is a generic term for everything from a simple wheel sensor giving distance and speed, to an all singing all dancing computer that measure cadence, speed, altitude, heart rate, power and anything else you can think of A power meter measures the power you are outputting, and is one input into a bike computer. Power meters are expensive - ...


5

With common digital cycle computers, wheel size shouldn't be an issue as you can configure them to work for any reasonable tire size on the market.


4

Cadence is useful to know if you want to optimize you technique and produce the most speed for effort. If you plot you speed vs cadence on a steady state ride, you can find you optimal cadence. A trained rider will normally rider around 80-90rpm - a novice needs time to perfect the technique to spin this fast efficiently. For a novice a a cadence meter can ...


4

I would have though a heart rate monitor would be most useful for training, until you get to the point where you need power meter.


3

It is not ANT+ - only the HR-11 is listed on "thisisant.com" (and its too old to be ANT+) I suspect it will analogue - most likely would be Polar compatible but cannot be certain. There are Cateye digital monitors, and also ANT+ monitors, the digital ones have "Digital" written on them, which is why I suspect analogue Best option (IMHO) would be to turf ...


3

Fady listening to music while riding is probably the most dangerous thing you can do so do not explore that idea please.. With that said I use the edge 500 and it has loads of functionality and will most likely support all your needs. You will usually need to purchase a speed/ cadence sensor with it. Battery life is great so long as you have it set to turn ...


2

I use the Garmin, originally with my iPhone, and since with my Garmin Edge 800. There's really nothing to discuss, it's been solid for at least 4 years, requires no set up, and just works, at least in my experience. I use the Wahoo iPhone dongle, when I use it for my iPhone, and when I use the iPhone to set up my power meter crank set. Both work well. I ...


2

I had the Garmin one (came with my Edge 500) and after about 6 months it died on me. After some reading it seems that the Garmin version is only water resistant. Living just outside of Vancouver BC I get a bunch of rain and ride in lots of wet. I even took it apart and the little screw that attaches the arm has no sealing so water just gets in. https://...


2

The red light flashes when the magnet passes the pick up sensor that you attach to the frame. The same sensor has an adjustable "arm" on it to pick up the magnet mounted on a spoke. It should flash green if it senses the magnet as it goes past the sensor arm. My experience is either the arm and or the entire sensor needs to be adjusted. Good luck.


2

To a large extent a magnet is a magnet (so long as it's strong enough). You may have to mount it in the correct orientation. A spoke-mounted magnet is quite easy to make or cheap to buy. The one that mounts on the crank for the cadence sensor may be a little harder, but I've got one that just relies on fixing to the pedal axle with its own magnetism (from ...


2

From my experience working with electric bikes, most of what I saw were sensors that were mounted on the crank which measure your biking cadence. A sensor would be fixed around the bottom bracket, and then a ring of magnets would spin with the crank, 'tripping' the sensor every time a magnet passed. They're called hall effect sensors and should be easy to ...


2

Contrary to the claim in the question, the ELEMNT smartphone app does have an option to set the wheel size. You can choose from an extensive list of common wheel and tyre sizes, manually enter the tyre circumference, or choose "automatic". In the last case, I assume the head unit uses GPS to infer the tyre circumference when it has a good signal.


1

You most likely need digital hall sensors (instead of analog versions). Most bldc motors use digital hall sensors. You should check your controller specs to see what type of hall sensors it supports but most likely you will need digital. have you tried testing the hall sensors with either a multimeter or controller tester to see if they switch on and off ...


1

I'm not very familiar with indoor training programs like Sufferfest. However, in general, if you're doing structured workouts indoors, it's better to target your efforts using power, heart rate, or perceived exertion. The latter is the least optimal, but it can be enough if you're just looking to improve fitness. You'd need some sort of workout plan that ...


1

It will be pretty unlikely that a bike store will carry just the magnets. There's simply not enough demand for them. However, it's very easy to find these replacement magnets through the internet. Just checking Amazon showed me several. I'm sure any of them will work: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=...


1

As long as the receiving end has ANT+ or Bluetooth Smart, also known as, Bluetooth low energy (BTLE) capability, the DuoTrap works fine. I have been using it with my Android phone for the last 2 years. If your head unit is BTLE capable, that is enough. You do not need to pair as any other bluetooth device (e.g. BT headset) that would require pairing. The ...


1

Compare to a torque wrench, Bicycle torque sensing are quite tricky. Checkout wikipedia torque sensor Torque sensor need good material QC, electrical measurement component and good sensor, AKA : expensive. And it is difficult to make a DIY kit to install it properly. But the benefit is a direct feed to your motor, increase output when torque feedback are ...


1

I had to switch bikes for a major climb and transferred the ANT and sensors to my other bike. After that nothing worked. The 510 found no sensors to pair with. I tried searching for other compatible devices and it also found nothing. When searching for speed/cadence sensor it prompted me for sensor number for which I did not have and never entered before....


1

Try re-pairing the 510 with the speed/cadence sensor. It seems like it's not connected and the speed data is coming from the GPS rather than the sensor. As suggested by others, the alignment of the speed/cadence sensor is important, but it must be close since you seem to get a little cadence data before it drops out. Perhaps it's too close and your crank ...


1

I also have an Edge 510 (since ~3 months) with the same sensor, but I have not experienced this. I have recently updated to the latest firmware, which often solves similar issues with power readings. Since you were riding at quite low temperatures, the capacity of the battery does decrease, but since the speed reading is fine I would not suspect the battery ...


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