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The misalignment may be caused by damage to inside of one of the shifter mechanism components you circled on the photo. They all stack up on a center post, and some have interlocking components to align everything just right. If one of these components is damaged (i.e. stripped out, chipped, etc.) it would not stop at the correct position, and keep rotating ...


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The combination of SL-M590, a 9 speed shifter, and the XTR RD-M900, a rear derailleur marketed as "8 speed," will work just fine with a 9 speed cassette. The reason for this compatability lies with the fact that Shimano rear derailleur's of the 7-8-9 speed mountain groups (& 7,8,9, 10 speed road groups) all share the same CABLE ACTUATION ...


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For gravel riding, why not consider remaining on a 2x drivetrain? You would get more range and less friction due to a better chainline compared to a 1x setup. Don't get me wrong, I use 1x on my MTB, but for gravel riding I think having a larger gear when doing road rides is very much welcome. Also the first option can be a bit cheaper if you would just use ...


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Your information is a little out of date, but for 9-speed, all road and mountain rear derailleurs and shifters are cross compatible from xtr and da to Alivio and Sora. Other combinations work to but for the purposes of your question, there are no issues or likely problems from your component selection.


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What i would do is check each individual part of the system. The goal here is to verify each component is not resisting the change up to the largest ring. Check the derailleur movement. As your bike has exposed cables you can wrap a rag around the front shifter cable and pull it away from the down-tube, which will actuate the derailleur. Put the shifter in ...


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It is difficult to say without physically seeing the bike and the integrity of the cable to the derailleur. One thing, I can think of is that there could be too much slack in the cable, which is why there is the need for an extra push. However, with a triple chain ring if you have a good shift from inner to middle that perhaps is not the case. Also to go ...


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You could get a 33 teeth small chainring and a 11–34 teeth cassette. Compared to your currently installed 34t chainring and 11–32t cassette it would make things 8% easier. One thing which took me a long time to realize: It’s possible to pedal quite slow. Usually you should pedal at about 90rpm, but when going up steep hills it can be necessary to drop down ...


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To go to 105 you would have to do the following: Front + Rear Derailleur Cassette, Chain Rings Chain STI Lever (at least the right one) - This alone is like $150 per lever if I recall correctly. Possibly new rear wheel Overall most people will not make a jump from Claris to 105 because the costs usually end up being almost the same price as 50% or more of ...


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It is an inline barrel adjuster. By holding the end closest to the Shimano "O" and rotating the knurled end you can finely adjust the shift point of the front derailleur. If looking at it from the knurled end, counterclockwise rotation will make the adjuster longer.Clockwise rotation will make the adjuster shorter. This movement will increase or ...


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