22

On or off road, but especially off road, it is desirable to be able to shift down more than one gear at a time to deal with abrupt changes in gradient and avoid being stuck in too a high a gear and stalling out. Also (as you mentioned) if you are required to slow down or stop suddenly, it's convenient to be able to drop down several gears while ...


17

You have a double front, right? The usual advice is to not shift into the highest 3 gears in the rear cassette when in front the chain is on the large chainring, and to not shift into the smallest 3 cogs, when the chain in front is on the small chainring. This prevents cross-chaining, which wears the chain quickly, produces noise and difficult shifting. ...


14

I'd go with full housing for both brake and gear cables and hold the cables on with cable clamps. There are many kinds of cable clamps to choose from. I prefer the type that have a screw clamp over the clip on type. The key will be finding clamps for your tubing diameter. If you need to have cable stops there are clamp on versions from a variety of vendors....


12

Depending on the year of your Giant Escape 3, it either has Shimano EF40 or EF41 shifters. Both shifters have the same User Manual which has this information on downshifting: Assuming you are talking about your rear derailleur (right shifter), to shift 1 position you need to push the lever a small amount. Pushing the lever more will cause it to shift 2 ...


12

The reason why shifting is arranged this way: Shifting to a larger chainring at the front gives a higher gear ratio, shifting to a larger sprocket at the rear gives a lower gear ratio. Shifting to larger chainring/sprocket requires positive pulling force from the shifter whereas shifting to smaller chainring/sprocket can be done with derailleur spring ...


11

Not using the upper and lower gears is a very effective solution. Stupid, but effective. Traditionally one would simply use the limit screws (at the rear derailleur, often marked L(ow) and H(igh)). Shift to the lowest/highest gear (front and rear) and tighten the screw so that it only allows the mech to move ever so slightly over the edge of the largest/...


10

This is the way most (99.999%) of bikes work. If you really want to change it - I advise against such a move, the only option would be hunt out a (fortunately) now defunct "Rapid Rise" or "Low Normal" rear derailleur. I was unfortunate enough to install one on a MTB in the early 2000's. I still suffer a from of PTSD recalling the decade ...


9

The B-screw controls the body angle of the derailleur. It pulls the pulleys away from the sprockets, so you don't rub against them. If you set it in the largest rear cog (as you should), when you're adequately clear, you don't have rubbing. Its a somewhat insensitive adjustment once you clear the cogs, but the closer you are to the loosest screw value ...


9

Yes, there is. Shimano/SRAM & compatible seven speed is 5mm cog-to-cog, and eight is 4.8mm. Generally what you're trying to do here can't be made to work very well. There are some tricks that without any additional parts can increase the movement of the derailer, but not decrease it. Also if you have a true 7-speed-only chain (not common anymore but they ...


9

An RD-5701 rear derailleur should work just fine as a replacement for an RD-6600. I've used an RD-5701 with an 11/28 cassette for the last 6-7 months with no issues, including swapping my crankset from a 50/34 compact to a 53/39 a few weeks ago.


9

Shimano's most recent compatibility chart is available here. Note that these are official compatibility ratings. It is fine to exceed official specs by a bit. At the rear, you can get a 10s Tiagra cassette that has a 34t cog, but it does technically require the long cage Tiagra RD. The issue was discussed here. The short cage Tiagra RD is rated for a ...


9

Welding is probably a bad idea - for several reasons. Heat changes things - no doubt you have welding skills, but you'll know that relatively thin metals warp and bend and change their temper. The thin metal of a derailleur will not take nicely to significant heat. You also risk upsetting the thin-walled tube of your chain and seat stays. 1b. Many ...


8

To answer this part of the question: Are there any hacks or types of shifters that let you quickly shift down across the gear range Grip shifters should allow one to click through the whole range of gears in one rotation (provided that one's wrist can manage to make such a movement). The same applies to certain bar-end and downtube shifters (with no "...


8

No, won’t work. Edit: To be more precise: The indexing will be off. The 11 speed road shifters pull more cable for each gear step (each “click”). So you’ll have shifted through the whole 10 speed cassette after 8 or 9 clicks. You won’t be able to shift to certain gears reliably, there will be lots of noise and ghost shifting. Similar to badly adjusted cable ...


7

3 basic tips Try to be predictive in your shifting. Don't wait until you really need the next lower gear to change gears. Try to do it before your cadence drops to where you're mashing on the pedals Ease up on the pedals when shifting. If you missed on the first tip, then let up on the mashing very briefly during the downshift. This will aid the chain in ...


7

Crossing chaining hasn't been any problem at all since the invention of bushless chains 20+ years ago and wasn't even a real problem back in the ancient days. It's a persistent myth that just won't die... Your bike should leave the shop capable of shifting into any combo of gears possible and riding any amount of time you like in that gear. At most I would ...


7

Either the L screw which limits how far the derailleur can move towards the wheel is too far in or the cable tension is too low. Try to increase the cable tension first by turning the barrel adjuster on the derailleur counter-clockwise. However, it looks like it’s already pretty far out. If it’s at the maximum you have to shift to the smallest cog (highest ...


7

I assume that you have a friction shifter? A friction shifter is one that does not click into an indexed position. You just adjust it until the derailleur is lined up where you want it. Assuming this is the case, the brake cable housing is what you should be using because it was the stuff that was around when those derailleurs were designed. The ...


6

There's the Nuvinci Harmony. It uses the Nuvinci N360 CVP hub, which is a continuously variable transmission, meaning there are no shift points. The Harmony controller changes the ratio based on cadence, or it can be adjusted manually.


6

Use the Clutch! This is what I always tell people when I'm teaching them how to shift gears properly. Chain-rings and Cogs are machined with *pickup points" that assist transferring the chain from one ring to the other, they only work while you're turning the cranks. So I tell people to let all the power off of their pedals, but keep the cranks turning and ...


6

I would suggest temperature change may be affecting the cable housing dimensions, which in turn affects the cable tension and therefore the dérailleur settings. I have been noticing this happening to myself this fall, especially switching to a bike with full length housing and 10 speeds on the rear dérailleur. With the large daily temperature changes in ...


6

Its likely that your bad shifting is due to messed up cables or a misadjusted derailleur. You can either cut the cable crimp off at the end of the cable with a pair of pliers, or pull it off with a pair of pliers. As for replacing the cable housing, you can either get your bike shop to cut a piece of housing of the right length by taking your old housing ...


6

I'm familiar with RSX brifters (brake and shift combo units) If that's what you have then its likely the grease has gummed up, stopping the under-lever from engaging the release. You might be able to finangle it a couple times by manipulating the underlever carefully, and you'll feel it catch. A blast in the guts of the brifter with brake cleaner or ...


6

I would suggest replacing the inner as well as all the outers. If the inner is frayed at all, you will not be able to rethread it. The benefits of a new cable are much better shifting, to the point cables are considered a consumable by many riders - just like tires and brake pads. Shifter cables are very generic and cheap - as low as $5 online for a set. ...


6

When the chain is bent sideways, the load at links is concentrated on one end of the pin and single side plate while the link is turned. This is supposed to wear that side of the link faster. Once the link is worn asymmetric, even straight chainline will concentrate load on the less worn side. No, I don't know if there are any actual measurements on this.


6

This problem developing over time starting from it working well implies a cable gone slack (not really probable with old left Ergos because they usually have cable pull to spare) or derailer pivots that have gotten too sloppy to shove the chain with the right level of assertion. If the front derailer got shoved out of position or bent due to chain jam or ...


6

Rohloff has developed electronic shifting for their hub; Shimano offers an electronic-shifting add-on for Alfine. I'm not aware of any such from SRAM or Sturmey-Archer.


6

Sounds like you have a bit too much cable tension in your new configuration. Usually cable tension is tuned with the barrel adjuster you mentioned, but if you cannot get the tension low enough with it, you'll need to loosen the bolt that attaches the cable to the derailleur, give the cable just a bit more slack and try again.


6

There's an old joke. Man says to his doctor "It hurts when I do this." Doctor says "Don't do that." If you've got a multi-speed bike and the shifting doesn't work well, the solution is to fix the shifting mechanism, not to avoid shifting. As others have said, the whole point of having multiple gears is to let you ride at a more efficient cadence, which lets ...


6

Most Shimano flat bar shifters have RAPIDFIRE PLUS which allows down shift of 3 gears with one push. It is quite a long stroke to shift three gears, so often its just as quick, and easier to activate the shiftier twice. To down shift the full range of gears in one or two actions would not be a normally be needed. The time (Which corresponds to distance as ...


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