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11

In the context of a high-end MTB designed to go quickly over difficult terrain, trigger shifters have the following advantages: They can be operated using only the thumb, without changing the grip, so the index finger is always ready to brake. Getting mud on the gloves does not impair operation. Modern grip shifters do exist, Sram makes a wide range of ...


8

Yes you can, no you should not. Since it is a new bike assembled by the shop, I strongly recommend you let them fix it. And it must be for free (more correct: you already paid for it, they did not delivery an adequate service). You are inexperienced. There is a very slim chance the derailleur is defective (for example the chain guides are weirdly bent after ...


7

Mechanical disc brakes can work well, but they need to be set up just right for top performance. There are a few aspects: Pad condition: you have new pads which is good because they will be flat and clean. They can be scuffed lightly with sandpaper to be refreshed when necessary, if a little dirty, or hardened/glazed. They need to be uniformly flat and not ...


7

I've had twist shifters on a couple of bikes, and I prefer trigger shifters because I like to keep the skin on my fingers - too often I would have to grip them tight when adding tension to the cable, and would almost get proto-blisters in my purlicue. They also mean that I'm effectively letting go of control of that side of the handlebar, as my hand is ...


7

I've owned/looked after a few bikes with twist shifters. They've always become stiff to the point of being hard to shift at all after a few years, even with new cables, and they're a pain to strip down compared to trigger shifters. I have successfully de- and re-greased some ancient SIS trigger shifters to good-as-new condition but never did so well with ...


6

Your picture conclusively shows that your brake is set up with too much pre-actuation of the arm. The caliper is bottoming out on itself before squeezing the rotor. Loosen the caliper mounting bolts. Reset the barrel adjusters all the way in, then 1 turn back on one of them. Then loosen the cable anchor bolt all the way and you will see how the arm moves all ...


6

edit: The only XTR calipers that used the appropriate banjo bolt for your Saint brake were part of the m960 series, which was released in the early 2000s and had integrated brake/shift controls (push the brake lever sideways to pull shift cable). these levers used the BH96 hose, which is equivalent stiffness to BH-59 and also had a banjo fitting at the lever....


5

The symptoms you are describing seems to be a "Ghost Leak" - Rides of Japan terms it this way. It might actually just be a kink in the hydraulic hose. His symptoms are similar. Squeezing the brake feels powerful, but holding on to it will eventually cause the hydraulic pressure to release. Once he lets go of the brake lever, and squeeze it again, ...


4

As a famous marketer once said, there are more cockroaches than humans. So there are more trigger shifters than twisting grips. In fact, two of the most expensive shifting systems, Pinion and Rolhoff, both uses twist shifters (as far as I know, there were some experimental trigger shifters being developed and funded on Kickstarter for Pinion). You do not see ...


4

It sounds like your hub needs basic service and you'll likely be fine. It may just need bearing adjustment, but on a used bike it's a good idea to go a little further to make sure all is well. Take it to a shop that's proficient with modern IGHs and ask for a dunk. The Shimano hubs are intended to have their core pulled, externally cleaned, dunked in an oil ...


4

Yes that's normal for an 80s style bike. Notice the rear of the dropout slot goes back the same distance, but the drive side has the derailleur hanger there. You can fit a block in the non-drive side, but having the slot open allows adjustment both ways. Getting the rear wheel aligned right can be easier if you clamp on the rear brake while doing up the ...


3

11-speed cranks on 10-speed bikes almost always work without issue. The reason is that the width jump in that generational change is the smallest because it's one of the speed plus-oneings that was done primarily by making the cassette longer rather than the spacing a bunch narrower. See chart from bikegremlin.com 10 speed cranks in 9 speed bikes often make ...


3

It is indeed HT2. The website mentions “2 piece crank construction”, which refers to this. It should be compatible assuming the arm length is the same and the Q-factor is the same.


2

The smaller sprockets can wear quickly because they have so few teeth. You can try getting single replacement sprockets, but generally you’d replace the whole cassette. Be aware that you’ll probably also have to replace your chain because you should only use a somewhat new chain on a new cassette. For the future you should: Get bigger chainrings if possible ...


2

I ran Gripshift Shifters back in the mid 90's for 5 years. I had previously had STI Thumb Shifters. Pros for me were: Less Bulk on the bars, they were just a cleaner setup. Probably more "aero" but that didn't really matter for me, I was a slow MTB racer! Change from top to bottom of rear chainset in one movement (not that you would do that), ...


2

Assuming you stick with the Nexus 8 and simply get the mechanical issue sorted, your total gear range is pretty well constrained. The lower gear ratio provided by that 22 tooth cog may be helpful to get up hills with a loaded touring bike, but it does take your chain gearing below the 2-2.2 range Shimano recommends for those 8 speed hubs. There's probably ...


2

After two years of trial en error i got the culprit: The last three cogs of the cassette come as a trio. This trio touches the back of the body at designated areas (see left side of picture below). When I apply a little grease on all of these areas before putting on the trio (see right side of picture below), the crackling sound disappears. After a few ...


2

The M590's are awesome shifters. Like all trigger shifters, the factory grease can become hardened and contaminated over time leading to frozen pawls--little levers that move the internal cog by fitting in the tooth grooves of the cog and act to either move the cog which winds both the inner cable and a spring. Another pawl, engages a groove holding the cog ...


1

It's unfortunately more complicated than just finding a 2x9 shifter. Pull ratios (the distance a cable has to "move" to shift from one gear to another) are different on road and mountain bikes groupsets (Acera is in the MTB range). Assuming you'd find a 2x9 with hydraulic brakes, they won't be directly compatible. There are adapters, but from what ...


1

I think you are out of luck there. There are expensive cable to hydraulic converters available. You could get (equally expensive) 10 speed hydraulic brifters and use a 10 speed to 9 speed cable pull converter. This should work with your existing drivetain (you’d have an "empty" 10th gear). But all of that would be a hack. Is the frame even short ...


1

How do you design a shifter and stay on the right side of this? You don't. You design a shifter that with repeated use breaks the cable. Then you expect the user to change the cable whenever it breaks, limping home without gear shifting function if the cable fails during a ride. David Gordon Wilson has written a text about cable fatigue. According to it, ...


1

In addition to the comments about using a blue thread locker (or red if you plan to never remove them), I would wonder if a different material of machine screw might have more friction in the threads as well. Stainless steel may have had threads cut too smooth to provide enough grip. Additionally, if it is a flathead or philips type screw head you will not ...


1

I've had a revelation using compressionless cable housing with my mechanical disc brakes, even with road bike levers they offer superb stopping power with little to no "sponginess". I'm using Jagwire myself. I would suggest replacing the wires at the same time. Two more things which I don't think were mentioned: aside from cleaning the rotors with ...


1

This is a duplicate question but I couldn't find it. It's fine. What you're looking at is the old brake pivots directly on the stud, but the new one mounts on the stud and has its own integral pivot. On the old one, you tighten the bolt very gently so you don't mushroom the post because the bolt is bottoming against the tip of the post. On the integral type, ...


1

Generally speaking, friction shifting works fine as long as you have the skill to shift, and that the shifter can pull enough cable to cover the whole width of movement needed. Bar end shifters can be friction, indexed, or switchable between both. Your existing derailleurs are probably fine to use with any friction shifter. The linked Golden Arrow ones are ...


1

Of the four generations of XTR to use banjo bolts (M9120, M9000, M987, M985), none of them use the same one as current aka second generation Saint (M820). You need the little o-rings in addition to the bolt.


1

I've had the same exact issue with similar Shimano brakes and Avid BB7. I normally put "preload" in the actuator arm, as I learned before on linear pull rim brakes (a.k.a. V-brakes). What I do is to fully screw in any barrel adjusters and back up a turn or two, then with one hand I move the actuator arm to the point where it engages the disc, then ...


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