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4

Reach adjust is though a small (2.5mm?) hex key on the 'inside' of the lever. The MT400's definitely have it. The amount of reach adjustment is quite wide, On my MT400's, from memory you can adjust it down until the lever very nearly hits the bars before the brakes are fully applied, so will be as good as can be for a child. Higher end brakes have better ...


4

To start with, forget the math of the gear calculators. You can use those later.... If you are spinning out - is you cadence at 90-100 when spun out? If not, leave the chain rings and work on spinning technique. Changing the chain rings will help only for the times you are spinning out. If you spinning out for a only a short percentage of the time, it may ...


4

Some caliper models use the threaded style pin and some use the bent cotter pin type one. Several of the pad shapes are used in calipers of either type. Every Shimano replacement pad that is compatible with a caliper that uses the bent pin type retention pins will come with any replacement pin or pins that may be needed, plural because there are actually 3 ...


4

I would say that changing the crankset by 2 teeth is not worth the money it costs. At least try to only change the chainrings first. Cassettes are much cheaper so it is more natural to start there. However, your current derailleur has the minimum size of the largest cog 40, exactly as you proposed. It won't do much. So thinkink about also increasing the ...


4

If your bike came with those ring sizes, it probably has one of the trekking type front derailleurs. Find its model number on the back side of the cage and look up its specs to corroborate. Using this type of FD with a 40, 42, 44 etc will create excess gap with the cage that may result in chain drop and/or mediocre shifting. To avoid this, switch to a non-...


3

Be careful about the expense. 26" makes this a 10 year old bike. While each change over that time has been small, end result is geometries and performance of bikes have significantly changed in that 10 years, My sons entry level $1k softtail is in many ways a better bike than my 9 year old Carbon Scott Spark 10. The cost of the upgrades and selling the ...


3

I believe that an 11-tooth cog is the smallest you can get on a Shimano cassette, but yes, you can replace the 12 with an 11. A couple caveats: The second sprocket will be sculpted to pick up the chain from a 12-tooth sprocket, so downshifts may be rougher. Obviously the 13 > 11 jump is a lot harder than the 12 > 11 jump.


3

Yes you can. You could need a new cassette screw too, the current one you have will be too big for the 11T cog. Realistically, the 1T different will not make as much a difference as improving your techique, muscle/power, tyre and air pressure choice and even nutrition. Make sure the new 11T cog is for Shimano 10s cassette, it might not fit otherwise. Worst ...


3

Ok this is exciting, I called around locally bikes owned bikes shops and asked if they had some scrap parts laying around. One of them had a Shimano SLX m7000 left brake assembly. I paid for the part and disassembled the lever. It is an exact fit. So, you can take a blade from the m7000 hydraulic series and put it on the newest m8100 hydraulic series! Fits ...


3

This problem happens enough across the board with all recent STIs, especially on heavily ridden bikes, that there may be an element to it where the bends the cable is being subjected to is the real problem and there's some inevitability to it. But it's happening to you especially often. Here are some possible reasons: You shift a lot. The fancy nosed ...


3

The derailleur in the first photo doesn't appear to be mounted correctly. See how there's a big gap between the axle and dropout slot? I think you should just go with a regular, bolt-on derailleur. Non-replaceable hangers are usually found on steel frames (check yours with a magnet) and are perfectly fine to use. With steel, you can just bend it back into ...


3

Changing the chainrings simply changes how fast or slow you can pedal. A 5.5% larger chainring (e.g. changing from 36 to 38 teeth) allows you to keep pedalling at a 5.5% higher speed. Of course this assumes that you are limited by how fast you can spin the pedals (and not by your fitness or road/trail conditions). Going for a cassette with a narrower gear ...


3

Definitely one of the models in the Shimano Tourney range. You don't need to know exact model to replace it. You just need to know what specs the replacement derailleur needs. You can look at the derailleur models in the Tourney lines in the Shimano Line-Up pages (you might find you exact model by comparing pictures also). All the specs are pretty self-...


2

TLDR: no that won't work. Shifters pull a certain length of cable per gear, derailleurs have an actuation ratio. Cable pulled x actuation ratio needs to match sprocket spacing. All Shimano road groups up to 10 speed (excluding Tiagra 4700 and GRX RX400 series) used the same derailleur actuation ratio so derailleurs of different 'speeds' could be mixed and ...


2

Assuming the 2013 Tiagra shifters are the 4600 series, it's not officially supported due to (indeed) difference in cable pull. I expect getting a smooth shift is going to be difficult if not impossible. If for some reason the Tiagra shifters are newer (and 4700 series) then the 10 speed shifter will work with the 11 speed 105 derailleur. You will obviously ...


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Shimano stamps the rear derailleur model number on the underside/lower plate of the parallelogram. All models for the last several decades.


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If the RD is suited for 36 teeth it may work with a 38 but highly unlikely with a 42. Shimano is conservative with teeth counts, you're right but still there are limits to get things to work. It is mainly a problem with geometry. The cage will have trouble to take up the extra length of chain. And also not to get into the way of the sprockets. You could try ...


2

After a while I'm back on this question, because finally the issue is solved. A local frame builder (Thanks Myles!) did the following: He reduced the diameter of the main bolt's conus. He shortened the bolt a bit Hi cleanend the inside of the handlebar (and possibly filed it slightly thinner). Now the bar end shifters fit well:


2

Here you go, the Shimano XT 12s brake lever. It's roughly 17mm


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Having shortened the chain because of stretch is an eyebrow-raising concept because by the time a full link's worth of slack has developed, that would be an off-the-charts amount of wear. But drivetrain wear probably isn't your problem either way. Also there are other reasons to find the need to remove links, like tuning the position of the axle in the ...


2

The formulas are a bit rubbish sadly. Based on those, my crank length should be 200mm and that's simply not available. Feel free to disregard those as "average-sized person fairy tales" On the other hand, I do run 165mm cranks on my recumbent without issue. They're hard to find but do exist. You can also get a machinist or engineering shop to drill ...


2

160mm crank is abnormally short. This doesn't mean that you shouldn't but as Axemasta mentions, you should have a bike fit before deciding what crank arm length you should have. Plus you've not given any details about your bike or it's size. There are so many variables involved in knee pain, it would be foolish for anyone to suggest your first course of ...


1

The crank chainring bolt center diameter (diameter of a circle that passes through the center of the chainring bolts) is what limits the maximum and minimum chainring sizes. It's likely that you will not be able to get a much smaller chainring on the FSA crank. To get to 24 tooth small rings you need an mountain bike crank. 'Two-piece' MTB cranks made for ...


1

If you have a 3x shifter the 2x derailleur might work, but very likely not as well as a proper 3x one. The cage is likely not deep enough to reach between the largest and smallest rings. You imply that the derailleur is installed on the bike, how did it get there? Is this a used bike you bought or did you have the derailleur replaced? If you have an Alivio ...


1

Yes, it will work, but not optimally. According to the bible: "Double" front derailers will work with triples, but if the middle ring is much smaller than the big ring, they will be balky shifting up from the small to the middle chainring. Several options: Drop the smallest chainring. You won't need it anyway. I have done this and I'm happy with the ...


1

Definitely get a dropper post, but there's no good reason to get rid of that front derailleur. Don't do it. I've been writing this a couple of times already lately; there seems to be a common misconception around but: 2× is superior to 1×. What's nice about 1× is that it allows for better rear suspension design (useful in hard-hitting enduro bikes), saves a ...


1

The same rules apply to mountain bikes as they do with road bikes when it comes to crosslining the chain. You can agrue it's even more important on mountainbiking as the chain bounces more on rougher terrain. When you change to a 1x system, the front chainring should have a chainline in between the current 24/34. So the crossline is not as extreme as with ...


1

SRAM Apex comes in 1x11, Shimano GRX 400 is 1x10 or 2x10. SRAM uses the small shift lever for both up and downshifts. On Shimano system the whole brake lever moves inward and is used for downshifts on the rear and up shifts on the front Personally I prefer the Shimano system as it makes it easier to downshift while braking and give more authority to up ...


1

The problem turned out to be the crank assembly. Apparently the chain ring offset on the original crank was wrong. The replacement that Shimano sent (having been given the bike year/make/model/groupset info etc) was a totally different offset than the one Kona shipped with the bike. The new crank resolved the chain slipping problem. I don't know who messed ...


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