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7

OK, I eventually worked out the easier way. The locknut has a hole in the end which, in addition to taking the skewer when fitted, has a hex socket for a 5mm allen key. Turn the hex/allen key anti-clockwise relative to the cone spanner to undo.


6

Page 19 of the linked Dealer Manual shows the barrel is in the shifter, up on the bars. From https://si.shimano.com/pdfs/dm/DM-RD0004-09-ENG.pdf If yours doesn't have one, are you using a different/wrong or off-brand shifter? You will need to fit an in-line barrel adjuster like this:


6

The way they've worded and shown this in diagrams has always been a little nutty. You can pretty much see what they mean if you max zoom on the full res pdf though. You are looking at the drive side of the bike. You are holding the chain stretched end to end between your hands. Your left hand holds the end that terminates in an inner link, your right one ...


6

11 speed GRX 810 and 600 are compatible with 9000, 8000, 7000, 6800, 5800 etc. 11 speed road groups - so it obviously uses the 11 speed cable pull ratio. 10 speed GRX 400 is compatible with the Tiagra 4700 10 speed road group only, so it uses the ‘11 speed’ cable pull ratio as well. Shimano is nice enough to publish very comprehensive (if complicated) ...


5

Sixteen spoke rear wheels do exist, but there aren't very many of them, and to function they need to have extremely stiff and strong rims. In this case, being a Dura-Ace product, it's reasonable to assume that the everything has already been pushed to around the limit in the design. In particular, making one of these a rear would require the compromise of ...


5

Shimano Hollowtech II cranks use two pinch bolts to secure the crank to the axle. From your picture it looks like you have those. You are missing the plastic end cap, and you may possibly be missing a washer that sits between the crank and the frame. There is no spacer, the play is probably because the crank arm is not fully on the spindle. To install the ...


4

It's the freehub rachet mechanism in the hub that makes a rapid repeated clicking sound when you stop pedaling. The cassette is not involved as it slides on the splined freehub body and has no moving parts. (Older technology freewheels combined the sprockets and rachet mechanism on on unit though.) Silent or quieter hubs are usually considered an upgrade. ...


3

You can't use a stock 10-speed cassette with your 5800 shifters because the spacing will be wrong. There are two good options here: Remove the 12t cog from an 11-speed road cassette. All (or almost all) the Shimano ones that start with 11 and go to 32 or less have 11-12-13 as the first three positions. Trading a one tooth jump for two teeth is negligible ...


3

Unfortunately you have no good solutions here. There is no reason why the shifting should not work with a missing sprocket, you just have to get the indexing correct. The jump from 19 to 23 may be poor though. You may be able to prevent the shifter from shifting off the truncated cassette by winding the low limit in. This is obviously a kludge and you are ...


3

There is an item Shimano calls a crank Plate Pin, which is that black plastic plate visible on your crank, and circled in the diagram below (4). It has a little pin which should stop the crank coming off in this situation, yours must have been damaged if the crank came off and it should be replaced. Many internet commenters scorn them but has worked for me ...


3

4700 now has a friend. The 10-speed GRX is the same deal. Typically compact-friendly road FDs can handle 46-30 without issue, so this shouldn't be a huge deal in the scheme of things.


2

What @Criggie said because there is no adjuster on these derailleurs, as you have discovered. Additionally, I find it possible to get gears working without an adjuster, or with the adjuster screwed all the way in - after all, Shimano have done the hard work already in engineering. You would set the high limit screw so the guide pulley is perfectly in line ...


2

That's definitely a Japanese frame and my guess is the wheels were an upgrade somewhere along the line. The mix of Shimano and Suntour also is unlikely to be how the bike was sold. My guess is the Cyclone derailleurs were an upgrade, but since it's friction shifting it all plays fine together. A web site with a lot of experts is the "Vintage Cream" ...


2

The beauty with friction shift levers is they're compatible with almost every derailleur. The greatest challenge is to get the rear shifting dialed in with the closely spaced rear cassette cogs on 10, 11 and 12 speed setups. But your Hilltopper was probably sold with 7 or 8 speeds in the back which will work perfectly for friction shifters. If one over or ...


2

Instead of rebuilding a new hub to your rim, it will probably be most cost effective to get a new rear wheel with one of the louder freehubs or you could even go for a complete set of wheels so the front & rear wheels have the same spokes & rims. BUT, Shimano XT hubs are excellent and yes Shimano is noted for making quiet freehubs. I have wheels ...


2

As Argenti Apparatus already mentioned, the sound comes from the hub. There are various kinds of springs and ratchets in different hubs. You can use this Youtube playlist with hub sound checks as a guide when selecting your hub. The videos also contain explanation commentary for the features of the sounds. For example:


1

I observe that this wheelset does not come with a 16 spoke rear wheel, because it uses half-radial and 2:1 spoking The OPTBAL (spoke lacing design) rear wheel features a unique 2:1 spoke lacing pattern with half the number of spokes on the non-drive side,...from https://www.duraace.com/global/en/wheels-intro-deep I can't get an exact count on the spokes, ...


1

I would suggest that the text is meant to say: "We strongly recommend to set the connecting pin in the hole of the outer link on the leading side in the direction of travel"


1

The asymmetric design is intended to be used as a rear wheel to correct the offset caused by the right hub flange being closer to the center than the left. I would keep that rim in the rear position, if these are the tubular version. You could reuse the spokes, but if you are lacing them in a different pattern, and/or if you are swapping hubs and the flanges ...


1

The pictures definitely show a chain that is routed incorrectly on the wrong side of the derailment prevention plate. (See diagram) It doesn’t matter that the bike is upside down, the chain is clearly on the wrong side of the plate.


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