Hot answers tagged

26

In most cases with bicycle parts, more expensive means lighter. There can be exceptions, especially when you get to the super low end parts where cheaper can also mean cheaper construction. Since you put so many miles on your bike and it seems important to you, I would spend the extra 2 pounds and grab the Acera. XT is generally used on mountain bikes where ...


18

This is one of those questions that can start arguments between bike mechanics--to cross or not to cross the derailer cables. Crossing appears to be becoming more common on new bikes, if the cables aren't internal, but it's also going to depend upon the bike. Smoother shifting is reported by some from crossed cables. I would talk to the mechanic at your LBS ...


16

You pays your moneys and you takes your chance Answer Maybe genuine, but just as likely not. Essentially by buying discount, you're circumventing any quality and control process from the brand owner. Costs are a strange thing - what costs you $40 in the shop retail, might be sold on sale for 20% off and the seller isn't making a loss. The various ...


15

They're trying to sell you stuff. More expensive stuff (have you looked at 11 speed consumable (chain+cassette) prices vs 10 speed?). I would not bother upgrading. As groups go to higher and higher speeds, the older stuff gets pushed down to lower component levels. So today's 11 speed 105 group will be next year's (or likely a few years later) Tiagra ...


13

I'm going to limit this answer to Shimano Hollowtech II BBs as per the question. Some other brands do it a little differently. Mountain external bearing crank spindles are longer than road spindles, and their respective bottom brackets are sized to fit one or the other. Shimano BBs have a plastic sleeve joining the two cups that protects the bearings from ...


12

Simple answer would be that it's heavier, which is very important in road-bikes. Regarding the cable friction and smoother shifting, road shifters are going towards electronics


12

This is an odd question. The sentiment that the only security here is physical security is correct. Think about the following: The Shimano Di2 components are not mated/matched to a specific computer or instance of E-Tube software. So there's no 1:1 relationship. Therefore, any computer equipped with the SM-PCE1 or SM-BCR2 programming cables can be used to ...


12

There's a couple of things here. First there are the physical properties of the groupsets. As you move up the groupsets, what you're buying into is essentially smoothness and lightness. But for a recreational rider, you'd basically need the groupset to hit a certain minimum level of quality, and anything beyond that would be lost by the rider. And my ...


12

I've never used Claris, but I've used a bunch of different Shimano road stuff, from 8 to 11 speed, as well as some SRAM. All other things being equal (which they never are), the more expensive Shimano groupset shifts smoother than the less expensive one. That, however, is splitting some really fine hairs. The shifting performance for modern brifters is nice ...


12

TL;DNR A Shimano 'Shadow Plus' or SRAM Type 2 dérailleur (aka clutch dérailleur) means you can change the chain tension by flicking a lever. For completeness - back in the late 2000's, Shimano introduced the 'Shadow' dérailleur (refer OP's link) which brings the deraileur in behind the cassette, providing it more protection from knocks and damage. A ...


11

From your photo, the left pulley (beefier, with metal bushing) is the top one, which goes closer to the cassette. I know that because that's how things were in every shimano derailer I had over the years, and I think that makes pretty much sense, since the beefier pulley (the upper one) actually shifts the gears, while the bottom, thinner one is only an ...


11

As long as you existing rotors are in good condition and thicker than 1.6mm (minimum safe thickness) you should have no issue with using them with the Shimanos. There doesn't seem to be an industry standard specification for rotor thickness but it is generally taken to be between 1.8mm - 2.0mm. The new callipers will self adjust to the rotor width. Clean ...


11

The picture is a RD-M780-SGS long cage. Shimano have three codes for rear derailleur length: Short - SS Medium - GS Long - SGS I'm not aware of where this is printed on the RD though so not so helpful. However Shimano only have one non-clutched XT Dyna-Sys (10 speed) RD the RD-M780-SGS (long cage 43t capacity). The clutched (shadow+) RDs come in GS (...


11

The allen is almost certainly metric. Both 2.5mm and 3mm are reasonably close to 7/64 inch. 3mm is a very common size on bikes. If you are going to do any work on a bike you need metric allen wrenches.


10

I have seen this frequently and routed my cables this way. By routing the shifter cable from the right side of the handlebar around the stem to the cable boss on the left side of the frame (and visa versa) I create a more gentle bend in the in the cable housing. A gentler bend creates less internal friction on the cable. Another benefit is less stress on the ...


10

Here's a photo of RD-M970 from behind. As you can see, the slotted (guide) pulley goes to knuckle and solid one (tension) to the bottom of cage. I'd align the arrows with chain movement direction that happens when you pedal forward.


10

No for a whole lot of reasons, the most decisive of which is that the 7801 hubs are among the only (along with WH-6600) ones Shimano's ever made that use a drive ring in the hub shell to engage the pawls, as opposed to the pawls and the ring they engage being all internal to the freehub body. In other words the design is completely different from any of the ...


10

The E012 error means that the torque sensor is misaligned. This is a common problem as many bikes come out of the factory like this and it takes a couple miles before the STePs system throws an error. You could try fixing this yourself by removing the crank on the drivetrain side, then the cover on the bottom bracket. The one time I had this happen, the LBS ...


10

This is to do with the different pull ratios employed by the different systems. In your case 10 vs 11 speed Shimano. http://blog.artscyclery.com/science-behind-the-magic/science-behind-the-magic-drivetrain-compatibility/ If you look at the table in the link - it says the 10 speed levers pull less than the 11 speed levers but the rear derailleur ratios are ...


10

You have the version of those cranks that came with French pedal threads (M14x1.25). I believe there's enough material to tap them to standard 9/16x20. The difference in diameter is very slight. It's important and not trivial to get the tap going in square.


10

Traditionally 'speeds' meant the number of gear configurations available. This is the number of sprockets in the cassette (or on the freewheel for older bikes) multiplied by the number of chainrings - hence the iconic '10 speed racer' for a bike with 5 sprockets in the rear and 2 chainrings. These days people tend to use 'speeds' to refer to just the number ...


10

In all honesty, you can use any disc you like, and from practically any manufacturer as long as the dia. (and fitment type) is the same.


10

You can often use the chain tool to drive the half-way inserted pin back out from the chain. I do not think it is advisable to attempt pressing it in again. It is certainly possible, I did re-pressed regular roller pins a couple of times when I or someone else accidentally pressed them out too far so that they fell off. It is not the most enjoyable ...


9

That particular Shimano freehub can be disassembled, but it is quite a job to get it back together afterward. There are around 80 2mm bearings in two different locations in the freehub, and a skilled and practiced mechanic has roughly a 60% chance of opening without losing parts, and successfully getting it back together. The good news is, there is a tool ...


9

You will need a 10-speed cassette, 10-speed rear derailleur, and 10-speed right side shifter and a 10-speed chain to work with the narrower spacing on the rear cassette. There tend to be some compatibility issues with 9-speed derailleurs run on a 10-speed drivetrain (some people seem to have luck using 9-speed shimano mountain derailleurs with 10-speed ...


9

The simple answer is yes, you can just change the crankset without replacing the entire drive train however there are other considerations. Depends on if your changing rings out or replacing the set and cranks. Other considerations if doing a full replacement are: Chain line When selecting a new crank set you need to ensure it aligns with the current ...


9

Shimano/SRAM 11 speed cassettes are wider than 8/9/10 speed ones. So yes, you need a new, wider freehub body, unless your old one was not very old and used a spacer to fit a 10-speed cassette. People with non-Shimano brand hubs are less likely to find replacement freehub bodies, it seems, leading to replacement of the whole hub, or even the whole wheel if ...


9

To prevent galvanic corrosion. When grease is appied, there is a thin film of grease that prevent direct contact between two different metal. To prevent water and contaminants, especially salt in the winter season, that would otherwise accelerates corrosion as discussed in (1) This will not work with plastic or carbon fiber (+epoxy as matrix) materials as ...


9

Yes, all 9-speed Shimano rear derailers share the same actuation ratio as all Shimano 7-speed ones, except for pre-7700 Dura Ace. I've never seen a 7-speed chain rub inside a 9-speed RD cage. If somehow that were an issue, an 8-speed chain would work fine.


9

Beyond the question of finickiness of actually using the system with higher cog counts, it's a matter of whether there's enough total cable pull from the shifter in friction mode to cover the range of movement needed given the cassette used and the actuation ratio of the derailer. Here's an excellent article with the basic data you need to figure it out, ...


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