Hot answers tagged

26

In most cases with bicycle parts, more expensive means lighter. There can be exceptions, especially when you get to the super low end parts where cheaper can also mean cheaper construction. Since you put so many miles on your bike and it seems important to you, I would spend the extra 2 pounds and grab the Acera. XT is generally used on mountain bikes where ...


20

This is one of those questions that can start arguments between bike mechanics--to cross or not to cross the derailer cables. Crossing appears to be becoming more common on new bikes, if the cables aren't internal, but it's also going to depend upon the bike. Smoother shifting is reported by some from crossed cables. I would talk to the mechanic at your LBS ...


18

will this new 7-speed chain work on a 10-speed cassette? No. That's based on my experience with a nine-speed chain shipped by mistake on a 10-speed drive train. That didn't work well - shifting was horrible at best and the chain wouldn't stay seated on some gears. If a nine-speed chain does that, a 7-speed chain will be unusable. If it even fits through ...


17

I'm going to limit this answer to Shimano Hollowtech II BBs as per the question. Some other brands do it a little differently. Mountain external bearing crank spindles are longer than road spindles, and their respective bottom brackets are sized to fit one or the other. Shimano BBs have a plastic sleeve joining the two cups that protects the bearings from ...


17

You cannot get a higher gear ratio by replacing the cassette. The 11 tooth sprocket is the smallest you can get on a compatible cassette. (Systems with 10 tooth sprockets exist but use a different freehub design). The issue is that you have 46/30 tooth sub-compact chainrings (I looked up specs here). Which are giving you the low ratios. This is common on ...


16

They're trying to sell you stuff. More expensive stuff (have you looked at 11 speed consumable (chain+cassette) prices vs 10 speed?). I would not bother upgrading. As groups go to higher and higher speeds, the older stuff gets pushed down to lower component levels. So today's 11 speed 105 group will be next year's (or likely a few years later) Tiagra ...


16

You pays your moneys and you takes your chance Answer Maybe genuine, but just as likely not. Essentially by buying discount, you're circumventing any quality and control process from the brand owner. Costs are a strange thing - what costs you $40 in the shop retail, might be sold on sale for 20% off and the seller isn't making a loss. The various ...


16

You can normally use chains from other legitimate vendors, be it SRAM or KMC or something else. You do not need to use Shimano™® chains only. But no-one can tell you whether your chain is of sufficient quality. Only you can inspect it, measure it and try it. We cannot do that. I am not even 100% convinced it is actually a fake chain, but I will just take is ...


13

Tandem cranks are special. The pedal thread directions on each arm are oriented correctly to prevent loosening from precession, as on any other bike. You just need two sets of normal pedals. If somehow non-tandem cranks have been installed such that either of the left cranks are right-threaded or the right captain crank is left-threaded, that situation is ...


13

Sadly, all I have is bad news. It's not a quality control issue. It may not have felt like much of a crash but that lever was hit hard. There is no way to fix it. The plastic shell is part of the structure of the lever, not just a cover. It also provides a human / machine interface with a particular shape and feel. If you glue it back together it won't be ...


13

The main problem is quality, in terms of dimensions and variance. If you think its an 11 speed chain but someone has just repackaged some 10 speed chain, then there will be issues. Likewise, if it were the right chain but didn't pass Quality Control and was rejected because it didn't match the required dimensions, then it could fail quicker, or accelerate ...


12

Simple answer would be that it's heavier, which is very important in road-bikes. Regarding the cable friction and smoother shifting, road shifters are going towards electronics


12

This is an odd question. The sentiment that the only security here is physical security is correct. Think about the following: The Shimano Di2 components are not mated/matched to a specific computer or instance of E-Tube software. So there's no 1:1 relationship. Therefore, any computer equipped with the SM-PCE1 or SM-BCR2 programming cables can be used to ...


12

There's a couple of things here. First there are the physical properties of the groupsets. As you move up the groupsets, what you're buying into is essentially smoothness and lightness. But for a recreational rider, you'd basically need the groupset to hit a certain minimum level of quality, and anything beyond that would be lost by the rider. And my ...


12

I've never used Claris, but I've used a bunch of different Shimano road stuff, from 8 to 11 speed, as well as some SRAM. All other things being equal (which they never are), the more expensive Shimano groupset shifts smoother than the less expensive one. That, however, is splitting some really fine hairs. The shifting performance for modern brifters is nice ...


12

TL;DNR A Shimano 'Shadow Plus' or SRAM Type 2 dérailleur (aka clutch dérailleur) means you can change the chain tension by flicking a lever. For completeness - back in the late 2000's, Shimano introduced the 'Shadow' dérailleur (refer OP's link) which brings the deraileur in behind the cassette, providing it more protection from knocks and damage. A ...


12

Shimano seems to keep a lot of their documentation online, you can find your specific manual there. For example, the site gives this picture for DEORE XT RD-M8000 derailleur. Essentially, the chain needs to follow the shortest path between the two jockey wheels. When installed properly, the chain won't touch the plate at all. If it does you've routed ...


12

If the OP's bike has a short cage Shimano rear derailleur, then officially, the maximum cog size is 30t. Going down to 28t is definitely fine, but going over 30t is not technically OK. Shimano's compatibility specifications are known to be conservative, however, so in practice, a 32t cog should work. I would caution against exceeding the maximum cog size by ...


12

How important is torque wrench on this? It's not important at all. The cassette lockring just has to be tight enough to not come off as it's not doing anything other than keeping the cassette from sliding off - some cassette lockrings are even make of aluminum. Use a long wrench and put a bit of force behind it and you'll be fine.


12

In the context of a high-end MTB designed to go quickly over difficult terrain, trigger shifters have the following advantages: They can be operated using only the thumb, without changing the grip, so the index finger is always ready to brake. Getting mud on the gloves does not impair operation. Modern grip shifters do exist, Sram makes a wide range of ...


11

As long as you existing rotors are in good condition and thicker than 1.6mm (minimum safe thickness) you should have no issue with using them with the Shimanos. There doesn't seem to be an industry standard specification for rotor thickness but it is generally taken to be between 1.8mm - 2.0mm. The new callipers will self adjust to the rotor width. Clean ...


11

The picture is a RD-M780-SGS long cage. Shimano have three codes for rear derailleur length: Short - SS Medium - GS Long - SGS I'm not aware of where this is printed on the RD though so not so helpful. However Shimano only have one non-clutched XT Dyna-Sys (10 speed) RD the RD-M780-SGS (long cage 43t capacity). The clutched (shadow+) RDs come in GS (...


11

I have seen this frequently and routed my cables this way. By routing the shifter cable from the right side of the handlebar around the stem to the cable boss on the left side of the frame (and visa versa) I create a more gentle bend in the in the cable housing. A gentler bend creates less internal friction on the cable. Another benefit is less stress on the ...


11

The allen is almost certainly metric. Both 2.5mm and 3mm are reasonably close to 7/64 inch. 3mm is a very common size on bikes. If you are going to do any work on a bike you need metric allen wrenches.


11

The E012 error means that the torque sensor is misaligned. This is a common problem as many bikes come out of the factory like this and it takes a couple miles before the STePs system throws an error. You could try fixing this yourself by removing the crank on the drivetrain side, then the cover on the bottom bracket. The one time I had this happen, the LBS ...


11

This is to do with the different pull ratios employed by the different systems. In your case 10 vs 11 speed Shimano. http://blog.artscyclery.com/science-behind-the-magic/science-behind-the-magic-drivetrain-compatibility/ If you look at the table in the link - it says the 10 speed levers pull less than the 11 speed levers but the rear derailleur ratios are ...


11

There does not appear to be anything wrong with the cassette. Shimano helpfully put some nice clear pictures of individual sprockets on the product page for the CS-58000 cassette. https://bike.shimano.com/en-EU/product/component/105-5800/CS-5800.html You can easily see that the smaller sprockets have some 'chisel' shaped teeth. Clicking at the rear ...


11

In all honesty, you can use any disc you like, and from practically any manufacturer as long as the dia. (and fitment type) is the same.


11

The intention is for it to be adjusted after the wheel is built but before it's ridden. Tension on the flanges has some effect on preload. Were it a QR hub, there's also the fact that some play is desirable off the bike, but not when the wheel is being built. This applies less or not at all to Shimano thru-axle hubs, because the adjustment doesn't usually ...


11

Even cheap components should shift okay-ish, unless they are badly worn. Shifting problems are usually caused by any combination of: Bad adjustment: Incorrectly set cable tension or limit screws. Excessive cable friction: Due to bad routing, worn cables, worn cables housing, missing/bad cable housing end caps or very low-quality cables. Bent derailleur ...


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