Hot answers tagged

26

In most cases with bicycle parts, more expensive means lighter. There can be exceptions, especially when you get to the super low end parts where cheaper can also mean cheaper construction. Since you put so many miles on your bike and it seems important to you, I would spend the extra 2 pounds and grab the Acera. XT is generally used on mountain bikes where ...


16

You pays your moneys and you takes your chance Answer Maybe genuine, but just as likely not. Essentially by buying discount, you're circumventing any quality and control process from the brand owner. Costs are a strange thing - what costs you $40 in the shop retail, might be sold on sale for 20% off and the seller isn't making a loss. The various ...


10

In all honesty, you can use any disc you like, and from practically any manufacturer as long as the dia. (and fitment type) is the same.


10

You can often use the chain tool to drive the half-way inserted pin back out from the chain. I do not think it is advisable to attempt pressing it in again. It is certainly possible, I did re-pressed regular roller pins a couple of times when I or someone else accidentally pressed them out too far so that they fell off. It is not the most enjoyable ...


8

As a sort of addendum to Nathan Knutson's answer, focusing on things to do before replacing the derailleur. Make sure wheel is fully in the dropouts and parallel to the frame. Properly and clean the drivetrain with a degreaser and apply a bike chain specific lubricant, not penetrating oil such as WD-40, GT85 etc. There are many videos that show how to do ...


8

Shimano's most recent compatibility chart is available here. Note that these are official compatibility ratings. It is fine to exceed official specs by a bit. At the rear, you can get a 10s Tiagra cassette that has a 34t cog, but it does technically require the long cage Tiagra RD. The issue was discussed here. The short cage Tiagra RD is rated for a ...


8

What tools do I need to remove the bracket? There's a plastic cap on the sides of the crank that you can pop off or unscrew, and inside there will be a Hex socket of about 6~8 mm , or a 6 sided nut to remove with a suitable socket. A spanner will not work. Then you need a crank puller to remove the crank arms from each side of the BB axle. This tool ...


8

One thing I have found on eBay---for both foreign and USA- domestic products--is that the listing will carry the heading for an aspect of a bicycle and the price posted will be quite low. For instance, a post will contain the picture of a complete hydraulic brake set from levers to calipers to the rotors and this will carry the title, "Acme, Co Complete ...


7

I think your minimum refurb to bring the bike up to a good standard would be: new wheels; bottom bracket, chain, cassette and chain-rings; housings and cables (shift and brake); tires, brake pads, bar-tape; and a total, thorough cleaning and re-adjustment. This is assuming the derailleurs and shifters are actually working OK, and your LBS just means '...


7

XT will shift a bit better and be lighter, but probably won't last any longer. The difference between the Sora and Acera is probably down to largest cog size - on MTB sets its larger. (Road will be around 11-28, MTB 11-34). The way I buy cassettes is decide a price point and look for something being sold at the biggest discount, so I aim for great value ...


7

The front wheel itself (for rim brakes) should be symmetric and can be installed both ways, unless you can find direction marks printed directly on its rim. The tires, however, can have recommended direction printed on them, which you should follow. For fully slick tires both directions are equivalent. For tires with tiny tread it is not as important as it ...


7

The Evans site is in error. Generally road derailleurs come in SS (short) and GS (medium) versions. The SGS long types are found in MTB groups. Your derailleur may be scraped up but not bent and still servidable, the derailleur hanger typically gets bent in a crash which saves the derailleur. My experience of crashes where I've gone down on my side is the ...


7

You stated that your frame is a Wilier Imperiale. I'm not certain what year this applies to, but it is very likely to have a proprietary bottom bracket standard known as the BB94 or BB93 standard. Per the Cyclingtips link: Wilier designed its BB94 (later re-named BB93) around Campagolo’s Ultra-Torque cranks. Seats for the bearings were moulded into the ...


7

OK, I eventually worked out the easier way. The locknut has a hole in the end which, in addition to taking the skewer when fitted, has a hex socket for a 5mm allen key. Turn the hex/allen key anti-clockwise relative to the cone spanner to undo.


6

Probably you'll be just fine, although it's technically outside the spec'd range. Per the Shimano 2019-2020 Products compatibility Information document (warning: PDF link), the RD-R8000 rear derailleur is compatible with all of the following cassettes: CS-R9100 CS-9000 CS-6800 CS-5800 CS-R8000 CS-HG800-11 CS-R7000 CS-HG700-11 As far as I know, that covers ...


6

I have no idea what explains the price difference. Well, basically: quality of materials and construction. Lighter weight, stronger materials are more expensive. Better designs tend to be more complicated which means more manufacturing steps at higher precision, which costs more to execute. There's also demand and what consumers in the market will pay. ...


6

Possibly the bike has a cassette size that the Dura-Ace Di2 rear derailleur does not support. The current DA RD-R9150 (short cage) rear derailleur has a max low sprocket size of 30 teeth whereas the Ultegra RD-R8050-GS (medium cage) will take up to a 34. If you have an 11-32 or 11-34 cassette, you do in fact need the Ultegra GS derailleur. SS and SG ...


6

A medium cage is fine with 11 up to 34. It may have been marketed by E. as a long cage. BTW: check the derailleur hanger, it might be bent. Also, don't throw the bent derailleur away. It could still be usable for spares like jockey wheels, bolts etc.


6

All Shimano and SRAM cassettes up to 10 speed are broadly compatible. They all use Shimano's Hyperglide II freehub body spline pattern. Cassettes with the same number of sprockets have the same sprocket spacing, sprocket width and overall width. So, you can replace a N speed Shimano/SRAM cassette with any other N speed one that has a range compatible ...


6

Many mechanical cable-actuated disc brake calipers do indeed move only a single pad when the cable is pulled. I believe Shimano mechanical disc brakes use this design. Unlike rim brakes the disc pads can be adjusted to run very close to the rotor, so the active pad does not have to move very far to pinch the rotor against the static pad. Hydraulic brakes ...


6

11 speed GRX 810 and 600 are compatible with 9000, 8000, 7000, 6800, 5800 etc. 11 speed road groups - so it obviously uses the 11 speed cable pull ratio. 10 speed GRX 400 is compatible with the Tiagra 4700 10 speed road group only, so it uses the ‘11 speed’ cable pull ratio as well. Shimano is nice enough to publish very comprehensive (if complicated) ...


6

The way they've worded and shown this in diagrams has always been a little nutty. You can pretty much see what they mean if you max zoom on the full res pdf though. You are looking at the drive side of the bike. You are holding the chain stretched end to end between your hands. Your left hand holds the end that terminates in an inner link, your right one ...


5

For 9-speed (or 10-speed, which uses the same actuation and usually works fine in this instance) with native 32t clearance, the options for a Shimano road group model are pretty limited due to how the chronology played out with 32t road cassette being a thing. A lot of the 11-speed road GS cage derailers can clear 32, but they won't work with your shifter. ...


5

It is possible to upgrade your groupset to be Syncro-shift compatible. All you need is the new BT-DN110 battery. Once you have the new battery, you just need to update all the firmware, then set it to Syncro-shift with the e-tube software.


5

Use the small lever as if you were moving to the small chain ring or smallest rear cog. This unwinds the cable as far as possible, though it might not have a huge effect depending on how frayed the stub is. Then, traditional advice is to start poking around with tweezers, needle-nose pliers and anything else that's small enough to get into the little hole ...


5

If you have the newer FD-5801 you don’t need the dedicated inline barrel adjusters. The derailleur itself has a built-in tension adjustment hex screw. It rotates the cable clamping point around which effectively shortens or lengthens the cable. See page 18 in the manual: https://si.shimano.com/pdfs/dm/DM-RAFD001-05-ENG.pdf Adjust the cable tension with ...


5

Slipping freehub pawl mechanism would be the prime suspect. The reason it slips when you are riding is the increased force you are putting through the drivetrain. There are number of questions and answers on this site about slipping freehubs. Sometimes dried grease is merely preventing the pawls from engaging properly. Next step would be to conform the ...


5

If the skipping started happening right after you replaced the chain, I would suspect that the cassette needs to be replaced. If the chain has excessive wear, it causes a wear pattern on the cassette that will prevent the new chain from engaging properly under heavy pedaling load. It is hard to discern this wear pattern by visual inspection. This ...


5

It's evident from your first picture that there is definitely a pretty bad derailleur cage alignment issue. The derailleur hanger does not appear bent, but it does look like the derailleur bolt may be cross threaded , as the derailleur body seems to be at an angle to the hanger. Check the derailleur installation and also check that the cage is not bent.


5

It sounds like your derailleur indexing is bad. The 'crackle' is the chain trying to climb the shift ramps on the next largest sprocket then falling off. It may be that your derailleur indexing is badly adjusted. You can run through a rear derailleur adjustment process and see if this fixes the problem. You should also check that your derailleur is aligned ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible