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17

It's a Shimano SPD cleat. There are a few different models, but they are all cross compatible. You can reuse the old ones if you can unscrew it, but new pair should be under 20€, too. EDIT: Looks like this is an old Shimano cleat, like this one: http://www.fixedgeargallery.com/reviews/dzr/ovis/10.jpg. Modern ones and most copies have a sharp angled "...


15

I've got a couple of pairs, and have had similar experiences. The best I can do is with my better pair (with a reasonably tight but comfortable ankle strap) underneath my splash - resistant leg warmers. That keeps out a short heavy shower, or light drizzle for a few hours, but persistent rain always gets in (and anyway feet get sweaty in overshoes). Short ...


13

Yes, you can use them with normal shoes, but as you predict, it isn't very comfortable, especially if your shoes have thin, flexible soles. Also, there's a risk of your foot slipping off, particularly in the wet. There are various options to temporarily convert clip pedals into ordinary flat ones. Fly pedals BBB BPD FeetRest pedal adaptors (SPD only)


12

A lot of riders appear to prefer SPD's, which is a great, and can work well (as indicated by the answers here). For interest sake here are some arguments for "road pedals" which are typically the three bolt variety. Pros - Road Pedals (SPD-SL and others) Road bike specific pedals (e.g., Shimano SPD-SL) are designed for a single purpose, road cycling, and ...


12

With the help of a bike fitter and mechanic, we found a very good solution that has served me well. I've put in about 2000 km this year and am heading to my first imperial century tomorrow. Mechanically, the solution involved: Custom mounting SPD cleats quite far back on the soles. I'll add a picture later, but I'd say they're 3/4 of the way to the heel. ...


11

if I wear the same clothes and just go for a walk/jog, then my feet stay dry for much longer Do you have mudguards (fenders) on your bike? If not your feet are in the spray from the front wheel and will get wet unless you wear over-boots. Or gumboots. For cycling when the roads are wet mudguards make a huge different to your comfort. You'll stay dryer ...


11

In my experience you mainly want them to be comfortable. But there are several considerations: If the shoes are too short your toes will bump the ends, and this can become torturous 75 mile into a centurion. On the other hand, if the shoes are loose your feet will slide back and forth. Not only can this be painful, but it means that you will not have a ...


10

I just leave a pair of shoes at the office and change shoes when I get there so I don't have to take them back and forth. It's amazing how much space shoes take up in a backpack/pannier. I think that even the "walkable" shoes aren't that comfortable to be in all day. And any cycling shoes that you did want to walk around in all day would lose a lot of the ...


9

I used to ride with skate shoes for a year and it was not good. I didn't know it. Generally skate shoes: bend more than MTB shoes so they'll not transfer all of your energy on the pedals do not have sticky soles so riding on rough trails may be harder and more dangerous due to the feet constantly changing position on the pedals Regarding non racing BMXers ...


9

It is a machine used for heating the shoes so that they can be formed to your feet. the shoes are heated. You then put them on your feet and they use a vacuum bag around the shoe to compress it against your foot so it gets the proper shape. Here's an article that explains it. I've had something similar done for hockey skates, although without the vacuum, and ...


9

The main thing that would determine whether or not a particular brand or style of shoe cover will help would be the closure around your ankle, above the top of the shoe. A standard, non-cycling over-shoe or shoe cover like those made by Totes and other manufacturers will usually cover most of the shoe, but the opening is wide and water will run down your ...


9

I wouldn't use silicone spray to waterproof leather, I'd use a leather boot proofer like Nikwax (the original product, not the brand). The spray is unlikely to damage the shoes but isn't very effective on smooth leather. Shoes that aren't designed to be waterproof often don't get perfectly waterproof even with treatment - stitching may leak and you'll ...


9

You need shoes, cleats and pedals all to be compatible. (There's also an implication that you have two feet, and nothing unusual there.) Shoes have to fit your feet comfortably, with a close fit around the rear and across the instep. Personally I find a slight roominess around the toes to be ideal. You can get shoes with laces, velcro, ratchets, elastic ...


8

Unless you're using clipless pedals, you really don't need much in terms of special shoes for cycling. However, there are plenty of advantages to using clipless pedals, so many people choose to use them. The big categories of clipless shoes are: Road shoes tend to have the cleat exposed and you walk on it any time you step. This is really bad for ...


8

Flat pedal specific shoes usually have a special rubber compound, such as Five Ten's sticky rubber or Shimano (and others) Vibram sole (used in hiking shoes as well). The goal of these special rubber compounds is to better stick to the pins of the pedals and are therefore usually softer so as to get a good grip on them. My personal experience with skate ...


8

Simple, yet powerful solution - pour max 1 teaspoon of sodium bicarbonate (baking soda, found in any store) into the shoes before or after wearing them. It will kill the bacteria and any other "stuff" that produces bad smell. It has no negative effects on skin whatsoever, except when applying it to freshly shaven skin - as it may cause inflammation of the ...


7

This is a mindfulness technique rather than a product, but when riding on flat pedals I consciously focus on keeping the balls of my feet over the pedal spindles. (I also resist the temptation, every time I see someone pushing flat pedals with their heels, to yell out "You're doing it wrong!")


7

Assuming that you're talking about cleats on your shoes, there are three main attachment systems. Left: 2-bolt, Middle: 2 or 3 bolt, Right: 3 bolt. Notice how the one on the left has a chunkier sole. The two-bolt option is used for SPD which are popular with MTB, commuting and touring cyclists. I use 2-bolt SPD shoes on my audax bike because I'm able to ...


7

You don't need to buy Look brand shoes to mount Look cleats on them. You do need shoes that have mounting holes that fit Look cleats. Look-compatible mounting holes are the dominant standard for road cycling shoes so almost any road cycling shoe will work (but dominant doesn't mean universal so you should check). As for the cleats themselves, there are ...


7

Before I went for clipless pedals and shoes to suit I found there were 2 options: sports sandals, ideally with some protection for your toes. These dry almost instantly, and all but the very cheapest have decent soles. ankle gaiters or shoe covers with trainers meant for cross country running. My Hi-tec trainers drain freely and absorb very little water. ...


7

IMO you want your shoes to be a "generously" large fit when at rest. Not so large they slide around on your feet but still biggish while remaining comfortable. Why? Your feet will subtly swell during exercise, making a good fit into a tight fit. That's why your slightly large fit becomes good after some time. Naturally this assumes your socks are the ...


7

The shoes and pedals that are appropriate for road cycling are the ones you feel comfortable using. Almost all MTB shoes come with a "plug" over the screw-hole recess that you could just leave in place. Make sure that's the case with any pair she has her eye on, if she decides to go that route. These probably won't be ideal, as they're still designed to ...


7

Yes, this shoe also accepts the MTB-style two bolt cleats. Three-bolt and two-bolt cleat pattern fits all major road and mountain pedals. (from https://www.specialized.com/jp/en/sport-road-shoes/p/117510?color=&searchText=61217-3238) They will accept Shimano SPD, Crankbrothers and other MTB cleats. However, the sole will get deformed or damaged. With ...


6

Here what you do. Contact Bodybike who makes bikes for spinning. Their pedals have SPD on one side and Look Delta on the other.Just run Look Delta cleats on your road shoes and Shimano SPD on your "everyday" shoes and you're set. https://body-bike.com/catalog/accessories/pedals


6

According to French wikipedia, automatic pedals seem to be clipless pedals. A wide range of manufacturers make waterproof shoe covers (also known as overshoes or booties), for use with both clipless pedal systems as well as your usual set of sneakers (be sure to check out the particular model to see if they're compatible. One designed solely for clipless ...


6

If odor is your main concern, I can highly recommend the so-called boot bananas. You put them in your shoes whenever you are not using them, and it slowly kills all odors. I have a pair of boot-bananas for a year now, and I am very enthousiastic about it, all odors are gone since I use them. It did not use them for my cycling shoes though (they don't smell ...


6

UPDATE: I use Fly Pedals now when I want to convert my clipless pedals into regular pedals. They are made of machined aluminum, light weight, and lock together so you can put them in your pocket. They cost $50 plus cleats. enter link description here This company (started on Kickstarter) makes flat platforms with straps on top and cleats on the bottom. ...


6

Bilateral asymmetry in pedaling is well-known and long-studied. You can see the abstract of a review of what is known about bilateral asymmetry in running and cycling here. During cycling, bilateral pedaling asymmetry is common, and not fixed at a particular split: it varies with cadence, power, duration, and your ride goals. Another article that is highly ...


6

Overshoes over the top of normal bicycling shoes with cleats are not "waterproof". Water gets in through the cleat holes. And, as you've discovered, through the ankle holes. All you can do is minimize the amount of water that gets into your shoes and delay how long it takes before you're soaked. First, if you're going to use shoes with cleats, you ...


6

One minor thing may be worth mentioning: different brands tend to make shoes that fit differently. From your other footwear, you may have got the sense that your feet are relatively wide or narrow, or you may have got the sense that they're relatively high volume (aka high instep). If you have feedback like this, ask someone at the bike store for help. ...


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