18

A lot will depend on the construction of the helmet. For example the basic material in the helmet will be some sort of sponge or foam which relies on its texture to absorb sudden impacts; does this degrade over time? For example, a loaf of bread gets its texture from the tiny air bubbles formed while rising and proving, but if left to prove too long, the ...


16

Make sure that the frame is not compromised. Looks for cracks or big dents, or any asymmetry in the forks. Make sure that there is no rust through the paint anywhere. If there is any chrome, make sure that any rust is only on the surface. Make sure that the seatpost isn't seized. This is pretty easy as you can just loosen the seatpost bolt and give the ...


16

I learnt to ride in my 20s. I couldn't find a big enough bike second hand, except by spending several times the price of a cheap new bike. So I bought a cheap new bike and learnt to ride on it (a steel so-called mountain bike but really a hybrid with knbbly tyres). Even that was actually only just big enough. I didn't really get confident in bike handling ...


15

When shopping for BSO bikes, people are just looking for a recreational ride that is a once in while, which leads them to focus on the sticker price. Looking at a mountain bike they then get to thinking "Hey, I can ride this around town. I can take it off roading if I wanted too.", so more bang for their buck. They also tend to look at the other ...


14

Many BSO's are styled like mountain bikes, probably because the mountain bike features tend to be appealing to people who don't know a lot about bicycles. Consumers buy these bicycles even though they will never use them on anything resembling a mountain trail. A thick frame, thick, knobby tires, and suspension make a bicycle look rugged. The appearance of ...


13

Prioritize more: Tires -- the bike must allow me to use the tires I want to use. I used to have a road bike that did not allow any tire wider than 25mm. Any bike that cannot use 35mm tires is useless to me. Some people are still under the illusion that narrow tires are fast, wide tires are slow; there is a bunch of research that indicates this is not ...


12

It matters in many ways where you buy the bike from. If you're buying online, then the parts will most likely be the same, although you should be careful to read the specs. Some online (brick and mortar as well) shops will have overstock bikes from previous years and the parts will be different from the current model year. If you buy from a local bike ...


12

The key is to know your intended use. Knowing what you don't want also helps. But also a bike has a wide variety of applications, like a car. Main (non BSO) adult bike types (people are always trying new ideas, or marketing approaches, so this is intended as an overview) Road (racing) bike. For those who want to ride as fast as possible (for them). The ...


11

One difference that internal cables make is if you transport your bike by car or have to haul it around by hand. Because the cables are inside the frame, they are less likely to get pinched by the clamp on your car-mount (especially if you use a trunk mount that clamps the top-tube). This is also true for car/bus bike mounts that clamp the down tube. If you ...


11

The problem with going 60 mph (assuming level ground, no wind, etc) is not gearing, which is an easy problem to solve. It's aerodynamics. Aerodynamic drag increases roughly with the square of your speed, and to get up to 60 mph on a conventional bike, you'd need to produce about 4000 W—which some sprinters can do for a few seconds. So to go anything like ...


10

I'm not sure about Austria, but here in the UK many general sports shops are no more than outlets for Nike and Adidas clothing. If you are someone who knows very little about bikes, I'd suggest that this would be riskier than going to a specialised bike shop. The only thing that would possibly make the general sports shop more attractive would be price. But ...


9

Security cameras have a standard called "pixels per foot" (ppf). This means that at a certain distance, an object 1 foot across (about the size of a US license plate) will have a certain number of pixels. As the object moves further away, the number of pixels per foot decreases. As the object moves closer, the number of pixels per foot increases. This is ...


9

It used to be easier to tell BSOs from "real" bikes, but now the technology is changing so rapidly, and it's much harder. On a bike older than about 20 years, one would first look at the frame, in two places: The joints. Better quality frames would be "lugged", with the steel tubes brazed into fittings (called lugs) that secured the joints. Cheap frames ...


7

I would try to avoid rim brakes for a low-maintenance commuter bike, because they're not low maintenance. And they don't work very well in the rain. They're also not much cheaper than cheap disk brakes. It's not worth the price difference. In my experience the roller brakes are less effective than disks or drums. The roller brakes don't bite, they're very ...


7

Is the bottom-bracket a cartridge unit? (googling this should give you an idea of what one looks like) If it's not, you definitely have a BSO and you should install a cartridge bb. Look at the hubs. What brand are they? If there is no brand marking on the hub body (or skewer) it's a bad sign. If this is the case, you should probably replace the whole wheel, ...


7

It's much easier to make a chunky looking frame cheaply than to make thin tubing cheaply. The heavier everything is supposed to be the less obvious it is that the BSO is not what it looks like. One key give-away is that the mountain bike is always marked "not suitable for off road use". Road bikes also have to use more expensive components, specifically ...


7

This can vary a good bit based upon the brand, quality of bicycle sold, and the agreement reached between the shop/brand. In general more volume=better deal, higher end=lower markup percentage (but higher dollar amount as the overall cost is higher as well). A high margin would be 40-45% (66-80% markup), low end would be around 20% margin (25% markup) in my ...


7

This is a deceptively complex question because it touches on many aspects of hub design, and answering it properly would also require taking some kind of survey of what design choices have wound up getting made for the various convertible vs. dedicated size through axle hubs, particularly in terms of what bearing sizes are used. Furthermore, for practical ...


7

Buy the bike you like and learn to ride on it. The Trek DS or something like it is a good bike to start on. Any bike in the pricing/style zone of the DS will last years. Welcome to cycling, it's a great sport with an amazing machine. Edit - adding some reasoning for my suggestion. Types of bikes If you think about the range of bicycles, in my mind they ...


6

The Surly Pacer is a good choice. My first real bike was a one, and I used it for commuting, training rides, and a two-week tour in Europe. Even though it wasn't "ideal" for training rides or touring, it worked great for me until I was able to afford more specialized bikes. The Pacer doesn't come with as many rack bosses as you'll want (one advantage of the ...


6

I would definetly negotiate for a lower price. In these hard times it should be expected. That does not mean you are a "weasel" or a "thief"...Are you kidding me? Pay top dollar if you choose (car dealers must love you). A company needs to earn my business. That said I do my research as others have mentioned above. Whilst shopping for a bike I would ...


6

I have no experience with reflectors but I do have experience with ordering "bit parts" from Shimano so may be able to help. The first step was to go to the Shimano site and find the official distributors for my country (UK). I was quite surprised since I'd never heard of them, but fortunately they had a website etc. (So if you have no joy with the German ...


6

The question was thouroughly answered in the comments. I shall try to summarise the points given. @rclocher mentioned that handlebar tape today can be removed easily without much residue. Thus making replacing bars and tape simple. This is contrary to my assumption which was based on limited and outdated experience. The tape is inexpensive for dealers and ...


6

To add to the other answer, the obvious signs here are: Unknown brand sold by Amazon Tourney, Zoom and unbranded components Mix of disc and rim brakes Unified rear triangle rear suspension Rear shock has huge coil spring and no visible damper Smaller suspicious things are cable routing over the moving gap, rack and fender mounts, removable cantilever studs ...


5

Buying a "fresh" helmet every couple years sounds a bit excessive. This is based on the personal experience of needing to replace couple helmets due to impacts. Both helmets were at least two years old. One was a direct hard head hit event during a race. The other was being hit by a car. This was back in the 80's. I'm assuming helmets are better today. ...


5

I think there are two questions here: 1 - Can you have a bike professionally assembled by a bike shop? In my experience (having done this a couple of times) it will typically cost the price of their "pro tune" or equivalent - the service when they break the bike down and put it back together. $2-300 say. Bike shops can be a bit sniffy about this, but ...


5

Single speed bikes tend to be very low end bikes--aside from fixies, but those are a different animal altogether. As such, you almost certainly will want a multispeed bike. Don't get too focused on having a specific number of gears. Instead, focus on a bike that meets your needs. For commuting, you'll mainly be looking at commuter bikes and road bikes, ...


5

Next to the M and L, it lists 65"-70", and 68.5"-75". " is an abbreviation for inches. So at 5'8" (5 feet 8 inches), or 68 inches, the M is probably a better fit, but if the rider is still growing, you might get the large because it's so close. That said, it seems to be a very expensive bike to be buying without a test ride first, even more so when you are ...


5

I'd suggest getting a used bike because you can resell it for less of a loss if you find it doesn't meet your needs. You still may want to buy it from a reputable dealer rather than an individual to ensure it's mechanically sound. Ask about a warranty, and get it in writing. Having acquired the bike, please be sure to not only learn the basics like ...


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