Hot answers tagged

50

It's difficult to say without seeing photos of the road layout. However, if the road itself continues round to the left, you should indicate right when you're leaving it. In general, you should think about the topology of the road, rather than its geometry. It doesn't matter that you're following a geometrically straight line; you're still leaving the ...


41

I use a sort of wave, raising my hand but with no movement in it (so not a 'Hey buddy' or 'I need help' side to side movement).... it works on my bicycle, on my motorcycle, and while driving a vehicle. It's got somewhat of a dual purpose: acknowledgement that I did something wrong, and/or 'thanks for letting me in' gratitude gesture. The motorcycle I find a ...


22

I'd go for the air-horn, for example the AirZound. It is my opinion that screaming and yelling (the primal scream) can cause a lot of unnecessary social distress, and is not a good alterntive for traffic communication and signalling under normal conditions. It ends up being more effective when you're in "panic" as said, which is barely a day-by-day ...


19

I'd recommend learning to do arm signals. Arm signals don't run out of batteries, and are plenty visible in most cases. They're certainly bigger than the turn signal lights you could put on a bicycle (which as Moz points out in a comment, makes distinguishing the 2 turn signals a possible issue), and the distance you need to see a bike turning is a lot ...


18

Screaming is faster and much more effective: I suspect it's usually best. Or use an electric horn or air horn. About screaming: The BHSI writes as follows. We don't find that horns do much for safety on a bicycle. Your voice is faster to react and adapts better to different situations. The primal scream produces good adrenalin-based reactions in ...


14

Will's answer is correct - this is to provide an identical example when driving: Source: Google Maps If you are headed northbound on State Road 213, the normal course of action is to continue around the left bend on SR213. However, a fair amount of traffic exits SR213 onto County Road 400 E. (I'm not sure why that little spur of road is labeled SR213 - ...


13

Here are a few loud horns: The hornit: A shop I used to work at sold these and they are extremely loud - around 140 decibels, but they sound like a loud beep rather than a horn. It takes 2 AAA batteries. Costs $45 US. The nice thing about this one is the button to press is remote, so you can have the horn on your fork or wherever. Airzound: http://...


13

Signalling before braking is a defensive riding skill, to be used when you think there are riders close behind. In my answer to one of the linked questions, I wrote If you think there are bikes behind you, signal with your hand (palm facing backwards) to show you're slowing and they should too, or call "SLOWING!". The idea here is that while bikes ...


11

I find that on ambiguous roads the best course of action is to point where you're going. It's not a standard signal but I find most drivers and pedestrians tend to pick up on the meaning. Also consider 'taking the lane' in instances like this to avoid cars wiping you out as they turn.


10

I have seen and used a sheepish wave and a shoulder shrug or head bow, never had someone try to beat me up after that.


10

I have this same problem on a couple of local descents. There isn't signal that communicates what you want to say, clearly and succinctly. Anything you try and do will take at least a hand off the bars and reduce your overall stability at speed. Here's some options: What you can do is stop pedalling, and pull to the side of the road so there is as much ...


9

Flashing yellow arrows have been introduced in the US recently to help ease congestion at intersections. This signal should be treated similar to a yield sign or a turn lane not controlled by its own traffic signal. If there is no oncoming traffic, you may make a left turn if it is safe to do so, but you must yield to any oncoming traffic and to any ...


8

I take a different approach to @Criggie, as many of the roads I ride are potholed, narrow, and/or winding. On descents I stay wide and take the lane -- I can see hazards ahead (and also be seen better). If I decide to look for somewhere to pull in, I sit up, stop pedalling and start scanning (with head, not just eye movements). Then when I do see ...


7

I have noticed that shouting (whatever words you use) is often taken personally by the drivers. It's probably the most effective and quickest to use in an emergency as described. I've seen several cyclists with a football whistle on a lanyard round the neck (mine is on my helmet strap) that can be held loosly between the teeth.


7

This is a right turn. You're entering a node from which you're taking the right-most exit. Going straight means taking the middle exit out of three. Pedestrians are not all going to look at your hand signals and understand them; pedestrians can barely be relied upon to understand motor vehicle blinkers. Pedestrians P already in the progress of crossing ...


7

They're in the highway code, but the word "must" isn't used in the online version or my paper copy from 1999, which states: Turning right 155. Well before you turn right you should Use your mirrors... Give a right turn signal A cycling-specific rule is 52 in my copy (67 in a more recent edition): 52. You should look all around ...


6

In Hawaii, it's common for drivers (and cyclists, I suppose) to use the shaka to communicate an apology on the road: To folks who know about it, the sign carries the same range of positive meanings as Aloha and should be taken as a friendly gesture. While it doesn't specifically communicate apology, the sign is used as a relaxed greeting, which could ...


6

I wave if I can but sometimes that's not possible because I'm controlling the bike. I always give them a look of apology and say "sorry" even though they can't hear me. I slightly exaggerate the look and the lip movements so that I can be sure that they see it. And most people can read lips well enough to pick up "sorry" even across an intersection. I ...


6

Yes. There are a number of different ways to initiate a paceline via hand signals, but the most common one I've seen and used is to make a circle with an upwards pointed finger. Watch Peter Sagan (white jersey, yellow/red helmet) do this in the following video. He's joking in this situation, but note that his fellow ...


6

Using a loud horn to vent your anger is not a good idea. Scared/confused drivers behave even worse than normal drivers, and a loud noise coming from a bike can confuse them. They look around for the car/truck that is blasting them, they won't be looking for a cyclist as they don't expect a horn noise to come from one. They may then waver from their line ...


6

A polite nod, wave or smile usually suffices. It doesn't need to be much, where I live in the UK raising one or two fingers from the steering wheel is plenty when driving. Not sure about down south, I've heard it's a fairly local thing, but I don't imagine it being too different.


5

I use a sort of wave, raising my hand but with no movement in it (so not a 'Hey buddy' or 'I need help' side to side movement).... it works on my bicycle, on my motorcycle, and while driving a vehicle. It's got somewhat of a dual purpose: acknowledgement that I did something wrong, and/or 'thanks for letting me in' gratitude gesture. This is the same ...


5

This would generally come down to you locality as some cultures would consider certain gestures rude. I guess there isn't a universal sign for thank you, but in most cultures I think a wave of the hand (more of a raise the hand and show the palm slightly) with a courteous smile or nod would do the trick. I tend to vary between a wave of the hand or a thumbs ...


5

I know you were asking about US/Canada, but anyway: In Russia official rules for drivers prescribe to use the following gestures: (from left to right: turn left, turn right, brake) It applies to cars with broken signal lights, motorcycles with broken signal lights and also for cyclists EDIT : Blue one shows all signals by his left arm, Red one shows all ...


5

In Denmark, raising your hand next to you shoulder is the accepted bike signal that you're going to stop. Not sure if all drivers will understand, and as there are no hills in Denmark I have no idea how this would work on a descent at high speeds, but it is a pretty effective signal.


4

One important simple communication from stoker to captain: Stop. I tell my stoker that if she says "stop" I will follow that command immediately. Explanations can follow later. This is especially important at intersections.


4

This is Jonathan the founder of Loud Bicycle the creators of the car horns for bikes. This is exactly what you need. You can buy the original horn over at http://www.loudbicycle.com, or back our new Kickstarter for a mini horn which is about half the weight of the original – and still sounds just like a car and is just as loud. https://www.kickstarter.com/...


4

The word "c'mon" is a bad choice for an alert word, because you close your mouth to form the M and the C is a back-of-mouth sound that you can't say loudly. The N sound is a nasal sound, so the volume there is through your nose. So the only loud part of this word is "---OOOOOnnn" If your alert phrase was "Come on!" then it would be better than "c'mon", ...


3

Short answer - there's no widely recognized hand gesture for I'm sorry. You could try the American Sign Language for sorry: I'm not sure how likely it is that this will be understood by the other person though.


3

Here's an easy recipe that I've seen used in a number of casual riding situations with anonymous cyclists: You should take the first pull, so pass the rider on the left. Make sure you're going slow enough that she can actually hitch a ride without a massive sprint. When your rear wheel is passing her front wheel (ie. about the time she can see you without ...


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