Hot answers tagged

8

From Sheldon Brown: The lever goes on the non-drive side of the bike (i.e. the side without the gears). One spring should be on the non-drive side of the bike and the other spring should be on the drive side. The smaller ends of the springs should be pointing towards each other, towards the center of the skewer. Since you asked this, I strongly suggest ...


7

The QR system was designed before the advent of modern disc brakes, and as such there are a few peculiarities such as the one you are experiencing. You should only worry about rubbing after clamping the QR. No fork or drop-out is perfectly set. When you put the wheel in the dropout with the QR open, there likely be a bit of slack in how it fits in the ...


7

Aside from weight, there is no real benefit. Titanium is an alloyed steel, and has no limitation on weight or riding style, generally, although there are likely ultra light versions which do have limits.


7

With respect to @fandango68, there are a number of misstatements. This part appears correct: Type 20 - Shamal Ultra, Eurus, Zonda and Neutron Ultra Wheels Type 40 - Vento, Khamsin and Khamsin CX Wheels Generic - everything else I added links to stores that sell the first two types of skewers. I can't find a generic level of Campy skewer. Also,...


7

Leave the wheel in tact and see if you can order some 'turbo trainer axle nuts', pictured below, to replace your current nuts on existing axle. If these don't work for you then start disassembling the wheel but research first; you need skinny spanners called cone spanners (£?) to do the job properly and risk dropping ball bearings (annoying). Not normally a ...


6

It is the internal distance between rear dropouts that defines the replacement QR skewer. The existing skewer can be used as a supplementary information. That distance also matches the hub locknut-to-locknut distance, but the latter is harder to measure because it is hard to insert the caliper between spokes. The image taken from Sheldon Brown's page. Make ...


6

I reached out to Pitlock DE about this question specifically (I'm an authorized North American retailer since 2006) and heard this back: Regarding the question of your customer about the spring washers, I talked to our technicians. The spring washers are wearing parts in theory but they shouldn’t break that easily. If you press the key firmly into ...


5

I'm curious about why you bought a trailer without checking that it would attach to your bike. It would be better to return it, taking your bike(s) into the shop, and get them to find something that works. You're already suffering from the sunk cost fallacy (you bought something that doesn't work and your proposed solution is to spend more time and effort on ...


5

Short answer: Drop to the 25mm. Your frame cannot support a 28mm tire. Alternatively, get a touring bike. (everyone needs more bikes!) If you are going to be 'loaded', a 28mm may be more likely to 'balloon off' your, most likely, narrow rim in a hard/fast corner than the 25mm. And the wider 28mm may be more likely to shimmy with load. (lots of ...


5

The skewer isn't an axle so nothing rotates and it and there's no need for grease. It's more likely that the wheels aren't completely straight in the dropouts causing the brakes or tyres to rub. I tend to tighten the skewers with the bike's weight on the wheels, rather than on a work stand. But you should also check the sequence of components again as well. ...


4

I haven't used them myself, but I've been asked to remove a broken set. A customer came back to their bike and discovered that a thief had tried to force them and failed. But not before breaking both front and rear lever mechanisms. I got both off without damaging the rest of the bike at all, with a cutting disk in the grinder they come off in seconds. ...


4

They come with bolts because QR's typcially don't clamp with enough force to keep the wheel from slipping forward. It looks like you have rear facing dropouts, so you should easily be able to use QR's if you get yourself a Surly Tuggnut. That little circle on the side of it is a QR adapter. You just pop it in and then slide your skewer all the way ...


4

Just because the trailer hitch is intended for an axle mount doesn't mean that's your only solution. I'd consider a steel bracket that clamps around both the chain and seat stay, providing a flat area large enough to mount your black hitch permanently. Advantage is it leaves your dropout untouched. Disadvantages The length of the draw bar may not be ...


4

Sounds like the thread of your skewer and/or the end nut is stripped ... as an emergency measure you could try inserting a slotted washer (see below) under the nut so that the QR can be tightened again, but for a proper repair, you'll need to get a replacement skewer.


3

Any sort of rubbing is undesirable. But, when the QR is open, things are likely to rub because the wheel can move around in the dropouts, so the only thing that needs attention is the rubbing when the QR is closed. Your front tyre should be centred between the forks when the QR is closed, if it's not and your disc is rubbing you certainly need some ...


3

The point of the quick release skewer they give you with a trainer is generally to prevent damage to your fancy skewer already on your bike, and make sure the trainer can grip onto the axle properly. If you have a quick release system, you should use the provided skewer. If you have a thru axle like a Maxle, you may need to buy a special adapter. If you ...


3

This may be too late (just joined StackExchange), but the reason that Pitlock does not recommend using their skewers in any horizontal type dropout is in the configuration of washers between the "cup" of the rotating end, and the Pit inside the "cup". Please refer to the photograph below; all numbers begin from the left side of the image. The toothed ...


3

I've always used a quick release for the front of my fixed gear bike, I've only ever used the bolts on the back. His highness Sir Sheldon Brown says you should be okay to use a quick release with an enclosed cam ( not an exposed cam ) with an acorn nut that has steel teeth ( not aluminum teeth ). http://sheldonbrown.com/skewers.html disclaimer: there's no ...


3

Changing cassette shouldn't require you to pull the axle (4) from the hub body. To get all this put back together you're going to need at least 1 15mm or 17mm (depending on hub) cone wrench and a little bit of know-how. I would assemble what you have there as 4-6-9-6-5 starting from the inside. The tricky part is getting the locknut (5) tight against the ...


3

I think there's more wrong than you've spotted. Unless there's a chunk missing from the end of the axle or the dropout you shouldn't get any movement under power or not. Bending a QR skewer is not easy to do, which suggests that there's a lot of force being applied, and it's obviously being applied where it shouldn't be. Here's a picture of that model, and ...


3

There is no issue with using a Q/R or fixed end anti theft skewer on a horizontal dropout. They are well above the threshold of strength required to fix your wheel in the dropouts.


3

It depends on how aggressive you ride. If you are a casual rider and rarely do many jumps or drops then they should work just fine. I am a pretty aggressive rider and have snapped more than my fair share of skewers trying to keep the wheel in place. I have also snapped a number of hollow axles because they are just not strong enough for the riding I do. So I ...


3

Titanium alloys are typically made of Aluminum and Vanadium: e.g. on a 3AL/2.5V Ti bike Frames for instance there is 3% Aluminum, 2.5% Vanadium and the rest is Titanium. Main benefits of Titanium is no corrosion, immense resistance to fatigue (material failure due to cyclic constraints), and weight indirectly (i.e. stronger material allows to use thinner ...


3

In my experience this is a problem with all such products. I use Pitlocks on my bikes and while they have slightly more corrugated interiors, they still slip. I have once sent a bike to be serviced and the shop extracted the Pit-locked rear wheel without damaging the bike or Pitlock. They said it was easier than making me post them the key. Since my bikes ...


3

Reviews state that its pretty easy to break into. To quote the road.cc article above: In locked mode, attempts to prise them open with my hands proved reassuringly futile. However, a wander round the web suggested they were readily defeated using heavy-duty pliers or a magnet… The latter worked but I later discovered slight play in the skewer permitted ...


3

I encountered the same thing with them and had the same experience of it being maddening and inexplicable. Don't go too far with installing them looser; one thing I did learn is that Pitlocks are perfectly good at coming loose if the initial torque is low. My "solution" was to order a stack of them, which Peter White in the US has. I feel like the one I have ...


2

For skewers, weight. That's it. Ti skewers will make your bike and your wallet lighter.


2

The rear wheel (with a Ti skewer) on one of my road bikes would flex and rub against the frame when I stomped on the pedals or climbed a steep hill no matter how tight I made the skewer. I fixed the problem by switching to a steel skewer. No more flex and even the rear derailleur shifts better.


2

I have broken a Ti stem that held my handlbars. Ti seat rail Ti frame (in 3 places now, alas) So Ti is not magical, but this is on a 18 year old frame now, so not that surprising. I have broken several axles, but steel ones have been sufficient for the last few years for me. I suspect weight is the only benefit, however when you care at the level of ...


2

I was looking into a similar thing today, and the Pitlock FAQ specifically states: "If you have horizontal dropouts on your bike's rear wheel (horizontal and open at the rear), we dissuade you from using the Pitlock system. Usually (almost) all rear wheels are assembled in vertical dropouts (opening diagonally towards the bottom). Here the assembly with ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible