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5

Yes. QR skewers are not designed to carry the weight of the bike. When riding, the weight is transferred from the axle to the dropouts directly, with the skewer just holding the friction interface solid between the two. A standard skewer can be damaged by using it on a "wheel-on" trainer. What you are looking for is a trainer skewer, which is a ...


4

I have to deal with these security skewers from time to time because people forget they are on there, lose the key, sell the bike, lend the bike to someone and don't tell them about the stupid skewer -- they are pretty irritating. Many types you can remove without damaging (though may not be able to do back up). This type I think you will have to permanently ...


4

Based on the photo you've included it looks like a Pitlock skewer (article #P050000). If you have not noticed yet, these are used as a lock to prevent unauthorized wheel removal. To remove these you need a special PIT-key that goes onto the part shown in the your first photo. I'm not sure how to remove the skewer without this special key, perhaps you can buy ...


4

To elaborate a bit on the other answer, your current's skewer's nut is plastic. I assume that the skewer's lever is also plastic. Clamping the skewer inside the trainer will scratch the plastic on both ends. The skewer clamps the wheel and dropouts laterally. On the side with the handle, there's a cam that translates the force you used to close the lever ...


4

Garmin is the vendor for the Tacx brand. Although the Tacx Blue trainer has been discontinued, Garmin still sells other trainers and offers a "universal quick release" part number T1402 on their website. The Tacx Blue listed as a compatible device. The compatible devices include the Boost trainer, Flow, FLUX 2, Flux S, Neo 2, Neo 2T and Satori ...


2

According to https://www.gtbicycles.com/can_en/pro-series-26 the bmx comes with: Rear Hub : Alloy Thread-on Disc Body, Sealed Bearings, Cr-Mo 3/8" Slotted 14mm Axle, 36h, 17mm Nut. So you need a complete replacement 14mm axle, and probably new nuts as well.


2

I went through the same thing. It was an easy set-up with my Giant TCR which has a skewer. BUT, I'm setting up a second system for my kids and husband's bike which are solid axle. My advice...KEEP your solid axle, add an acorn nut to the end (the side with the gears) - and all will fit and work well.


1

From the photo it looks bent, not just pulled apart from over-tightening. It also looks a bit like something rested on the skewer and abraded it (where it comes out of the axle). Was the axle really seated in the dropout? It also looks like a lot of skewer sticking out. I think in general there is some advice against using quick release skewers on front ...


1

Thanks for adding the photo. Obviously, it's hard to be certain from afar, and you don't have a first hand account. You seem to have been told that the front skewer rod snapped. If it snapped, it would have let your front wheel come out of the fork, which would cause a crash. Bikes do have little lips on the fork ends to reduce the probability that the wheel ...


1

I am not a qualified accident investigator A skewer snapping sounds more like a result than a cause. The skewer holds the wheel in place, and breaking is a consequence of some other event. I would get an impartial person to inspect the bike closely, and document what they find. Don't fix anything though. front wheel spoke trueness and dents/bent spokes ...


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