42

I used a phone for about two months, then bought a Wahoo GPS computer in March 2018. The primary motivation was that My phone has lousy GPS (Huawei P10). Multiple times a week, it would claim that I'd teleported half way across town, lose signal and never get it back, or drift so that the track would look continuous but end up hundreds of meters from my ...


13

I use a phone for navigating long rides (up to 400km/20 hours). I'm rare among distance riders, and if I had unlimited money might get a dedicated unit. For me the phone works well - a dynamo keeps the battery topped up, I've got offline mapping and setting the screen brightness manually means I'm not dazzled. I don't (usually) have turn by turn navigation, ...


12

Main reason not to use you phone has to be cost and crash resistance. While a dedicated unit may set you back $250-$350, many people have a decent phone with a replacement cost of over $1000. Given the number of phones I see with broken screens, the crash resistance of a phone has to be considered less than ideal at best. A dedicated unit is not only ...


11

I have had my phone attached to the handlebars in a little sleeve made of gaffer tape and some clear plastic I got out of the recycle bin and it's been good for a few years (I've replaced the sleeve thingy a few times as it disintegrated). For protection it's got a strip of high density foam at the back of it so that it doesn't clunk on the gooseneck when I ...


10

In addition to all the other advantages a dedicated cycling computer has over a phone, battery life when collecting data from wireless sensors such as speed and cadence sensors and power meters is much better with a cycling-specific computer compared to a smart phone. ANT+ is designed for low power consumption, so battery life for ANT+ components is much ...


10

Easy bit - Touch screens don't usually work when wet, you can easily test it, sprinkle some water on the screen and see how it goes. Because phones are high volume consumer goods designed as life style toys, not outdoor equipment, as far as IP ratings, I personally believe the claimed IP ratings are based on marketing need for a bigger number than the ...


10

Yes, it can. I had my HTC One (M8) mounted to my handlebars and after only ONE RIDE the camera broke. The focus element of the camera was a moving part that just couldn't stand up to the shock. The phone still worked fine, but phones w/o cameras suck so I had to get a new one.


8

There are several phone apps / web sites you can use. They all have a free mode and a premium mode. A few of them are: Endomondo Last time I used this (a couple of years back) it was able to give real time updates and "coaching" on your performance. It can handle many different sports and activities. MapMyRide I haven't used this; some other people here do ...


7

I've just started using an android app called IPbike. If you like tweaking settings and getting the items displayed just right it could be good for you; if not, look elsewhere. It can apparently sync with Strava etc, though I don't use that feature, and can import routes. It uses openstreetmap (a plus point for me as I've made a few contributions myself). ...


6

How about a top tube bag? I've had a couple of handlebar mounts and they haven't lasted long in crowded bike sheds. Even mounted quite centrally they're vulnerable to knocks and aren't very strong. A top tube bag with a clear lid works better for me. Do be sure to get one big enough though. It will take the battery pack as well and should do a decent ...


5

I regularly use a stem-mounted phone mount for navigation on my tourer, and occasionally on my hybrid. I have tried my phone in a toptube bag, and don't get on with either the bag aspect or the position. One benefit I find is that mounting it further forwards means I can mount it more upright, which shields the screen a bit against both rain (waterproof ...


5

I use a Sony Xperia z3 compact as my bike computer/GPS, in all UK weather. It's described by the manufacturer as waterproof, but not for immersion, and I've never had any water ingress issues (even washing it up). You do have to be careful the seal is tight on the sim card slot. As for using it in the rain, the touchscreen isn't completely useless, but it ...


5

I just ruined my iphone6+ after a hard mountain bike ride (much harder than I have ever done before) and I had the phone attached to the handlebars. The vibrations ruined the screen is permanently cloudy. I have done this for many rides before but nothing like this ride. I have learned my hard lesson.


5

The two circular holes will mount to a Go-Pro type mount. This is clever as the Go-Pro mount is available for a wide variety of surfaces include suction cups, helmet mounts, sticky mounts, handlebars, selfie poles and the like. Notice the adapter has two tabs and a hole. That's a "downward" facing part, so its to go into a matching part with three tabs ...


5

I got a RAM mount and put my new iPhoneXR into it on my Honda VTX1300 (sorry not a pedal bike). Did about 600 miles through Colorado and Wyoming... and my optical stabilization was done. The phone has always been in a case since the day I bought it and was never dropped. But after the ride the front facing camera would focus in and out like 100x second.... ...


4

I used cheap eBay cases and a expensive Quad Lock. I have wrecked to phones now. Pixel 2 and HTC one m8 previously, basically it was camera issues. The one m8 started to vibrate the lens non stop. And the Pixel2 forgot it had a camera..... Basically any constant vibrations will damage your phone.


4

My GPS is powered by AA batteries. No need for recharging in the field (powerbank or so), I can just take a sealed pair of alkaline batteries with me so if something unforseen happens, the trip takes much longer than expected, I have at any rate still backup power to navigate. Even if I'd forgotten those, I could easily get fitting batteries at any ...


3

I believe that my iPhone 6 got damaged after several rides with it attached to my handlebar. The "believe" part is there because it could have just started malfunctioning as any other digital device, however it functioned very well, until I made these few rides. I ride a road "Specialized bike. The Torontonian streets are chipped quite a bit. And you can ...


3

If you have any HTC phone with a "dual camera" at the back (HTC M8 e.g.), then don't do this - this is a known issue. It has sth. to do with the two cameras misaligning due to the vibration. The camera will then be unable to focus, and you won't be able to use it at all anymore. Learned this the hard way as well :)


3

I have been motorcycling with my iphone attached with a Ram Mount. No problems ever, and that's constant vibration. I wouldn't worry.


3

I use a Garmin 510. I keep telling myself that I will retire it for the newer 520 when it breaks but the darn thing won't break. When I ride, I don't want to be interrupted by life outside of my bike. Yes, I will always keep a phone on me for all rides for emergencies and to send my location to my wife, but it will be on silent and tucked away safely in my ...


3

I work for the world's largest bike parts distributor, and we sell a lot of Garmin equipment. The appeal, especial with Garmin (and what they're pushing) is the device independence and precision. If you buy a Garmin, that device will literally be supported forever, and with quality that meets and exceeds military / naval standards. I have an old Garmin from ...


3

I'm not convinced you'll find an entirely satisfactory app, as most people who invest in a pricey power meter would tend to use a separate device such as this one https://www8.garmin.com/manuals/webhelp/edge530/EN-US/GUID-53FC7978-187F-4E53-AA33-04853F86B05F.html This app seems like it might have what you are looking for https://www.jepster.nl/features.html ...


2

The most solidly locked-on setup that I know of is the Quadlock range. If they make.a specific case for your phone, then that's the best way to go, but otherwise you can attach the mounting kit to the back of your phone or current case. They do small mounts that will fit on your stem or handlebar, as well as an out-front mount that will be the easiest to use ...


2

I use a phone and a gopro, both of which have somewhat small batteries. So to power them I use a USB battery which has two USB ports, one for each. Its a little heavy but I'd rather lug that around than have my camera go flat in 90 minutes. 9 Ah battery 2.5 Ah battery USB connectors are friction fit, which is fine at home on a desk but is not overly ...


2

In my case, I went on a six hours ride in a hilly, forested area (where GPS lost its signal), and there was a distinct lack of phone coverage (for an hour or so). Surprisingly (or not), the Strava application recorded a ONE WEEK trip (which the Strava site wouldn't accept for uploading). Also, I've had another ride where the GPS "registered" the ride 200 ...


2

Once we had scientific surveys (in the middle of the desert) with the teams using mobile phones (with specialized software) and also Garmin devices (for positioning). Since then I remember that navigation devices were easily readable in very direct and bright sunlight, when nothing was visible on the phone without raising it close to the eyes and covering ...


2

Consider the zero case - stick your phone in your pocket instead of on the bars. Most smartphones shut their screen off fairly quickly - if you force the screen to stay on, it eats battery and produces heat. The phone is exposed and vulnerable to rain and damage from impact. The phone can be relatively easily snatched and stolen. Many smartphone screens are ...


2

IpBike (which I use without sensors) gives rolling average power if your power meter is ANT+ (or BLE I think). The example shows a 20s average, which can be configured. This is Android only, and free to try for long enough to get a feel for it (not expensive after that).


1

IP67/68 resistant phones do exist, but regular phones offer a much larger choice (especially if you exclude the non-rugged IP67 phones which are not quite comparable to bike GPS in terms of protection). If you want to use your phone as a bike GPS, you will be limited to those sturdy phones. And such phones themselves result from a compromise between the ...


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