4

I bought a Wahoo Elemnt a few month for a simple reason: cycling is for me the most demanding use of the phone, having the phone and cycling GPS separated is better on the long run and allows to choose phones that wouldn't be in the options if cycling is in the requirements. While it is true that navigation apps have gotten better, cycling GPS have also ...


3

I do use an iPhone rather than a dedicated head unit, but I think I can speak to some of the drawbacks (and non-drawbacks) of using a phone. Mounting options: It is possible to mount your phone like a bike computer, but its weight and moment of inertia on the mount are too much for some mounts; it also may not fit between the stem and some out-front mounts. ...


3

Many answers mention battery life as an advantage to dedicated cycling GPS units. However, this issue hasn’t been explicitly addressed yet: on phones, the screen is a major drain on battery life. Phone screens are usually on standby. Cycling computers use much simpler screens with lower power consumption. Thus, if you value being able to see your statistics ...


2

Consider the zero case - stick your phone in your pocket instead of on the bars. Most smartphones shut their screen off fairly quickly - if you force the screen to stay on, it eats battery and produces heat. The phone is exposed and vulnerable to rain and damage from impact. The phone can be relatively easily snatched and stolen. Many smartphone screens are ...


1

I am 99% sure that the issue is not the bicycle (unless you changed from a soft/wide tyre to a super-skinny one, having too many vibrations that the photo-software cannot compensate adequately). What you get is resulting from the lens being dirty, so the phone either: needs longer exposure, so the bike movement is noticeable (blurry from movement); the ...


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