Hot answers tagged

26

I've got about 20,000 miles experience commuting in Alaska snow. There are really 3 kinds of snow to deal with: deep & fluffy, hard & icy, and slush. I have two bikes, a Pugsley with Large Marge tires for deep snow, and a Kona 29er for everything else. The trick to the Pugs is deflating the tires so they track right. 10psi in front is maybe too ...


12

Clipless pedals are great for winter riding, just like any other season. I live in Minnesota and ride year round, and in the winter I ride on the streets, trails, and over frozen lakes and rivers. When I ride, I'm clipped in. You're not at any more risk of suddenly wiping out than mountain bikers are when traveling over unfamiliar terrain. When you do ride ...


11

You would probably be alright by adding some studded tires to your existing bike. That will help a lot with control when ice is present. Skinny tires actually handle deep stuff well since they cut through it instead of float on top of it. Anyone who rides a fat bike knows that if the snow isn't compacted, your front wheel can float sideways and put you on ...


11

This depends a lot on the rider. Ultimately you need to judge yourself. Clipless in snow does make a lot of sense. The most important thing when riding on snow is an even and smooth power stroke, whilst also having good control about your weight distribution. Being clipped in makes this a lot easier. You can lower your dropper post a bit, get in a higher ...


9

Lower pressure for a larger contact patch to increase traction is common. Cyclocross riders (for one) use low pressure. Weigh that against pinch flats. As you lower the pressure you increase chance of pinch flats. In snow the pot holes and bumps are partially hidden. Tread type and depth will also affect snow traction.


9

You can avoid this problem altogether with studded tires The pattern is deep enough so that it grabs quite well on the snow, and the studs give you a very good grip on ice and hard snow. On uniformly flat ice, the grip is almost as good as asphalt. If the tires are good, you can wear them for all winter season, even if there is no ice. The studs are not ...


8

Your winters are harsher than mine but I run spiked tyres for the ice that we do get. They have some tread (like a not too agreesive MTB tyre). The choice of tyre is more important than the choice of bike. But winter tyres are wider than road tyres (35mm+) so won't fit road bikes and may not fit your frame. Bikes suffer in winter (wet all the time + ...


8

Another category to search can be "bikepacking bike with drop bars". Examples I can think about: the Decathlon Riverside Touring 920 (not sure it will be available in North America though), Salsa Cutthroat or Salsa Fargo These are 29er with 2.4 inches wheels, drop bar and no suspension. As said, these are bikepacking bikes, so designed to be loaded ...


7

I have been riding a Gates CDC (not Centertrack) belt drive for almost a year now. I have ridden my bike in various weather conditions and temperatures ranging from over 90℉ to under 0℉. I have ridden through a variety of snowy conditions, including a foot-and-half of fresh snow on a few occasions, but more commonly mixed snow/ice/slush conditions. I have ...


6

I strongly suggest you put a studded tyre on the bike (ideally 2, but certainly the back in your case). I run Schwalbe winters for occasional icy patches (overkill round here, except when they aren't). This will be important for stopping as well as going. Spinning the back wheel with a trailer is no fun. The trailer tyres don't matter nearly so much. ...


6

It's kind of goofy and requires a bit of time to do, but you can zip tie your wheels to make snow wheels. While they aren't reusable if you remove them, it's a fairly cheap method. Here's a brief overview/guide. And then I went and found these too. They are supposed to work with all brake systems. As far as the socks go, I couldn't find anything smaller ...


5

In addition to @jeyhendren and @phil-johnstone nice answers I want to add my 3 findings. First year with snow I (RieseMüller/Bosch/Nuvinci/center track) had no problem whatsowever. I can't remember the quality of the snow but during a winter it must have been sticky several times. Then 2 weeks ago the belt jumped and, contrary to instructions, I tried to ...


5

At the time the question was asked, there were no 16" studded bike tyres. Now, however, there are: http://www.schwalbe.com/en/pressereader/spikes-for-birdy-and-brompton.html But unfortunately there are two different 16" rim sizes, and the new Schwalbes are 349mm (as used by Brompton), and 16" Dahon is 305mm. It might be possible to fit a Brompton sized ...


5

I prefer not using anything in the snow to block the snow. You risk the snow packing in the snow blocker (e.g. fenders) and freezing, which can be dangerous. A brush against the tire (depending on the stiffness of the bristles) could also damage your tire. If you want to use something, a seatpost fender and a downtube mudguard are probalby the safest ...


5

Is the term "gravel" today already tied to, say, 700c-38, and precludes such a lavish size? That's definitely not true of most gravel bikes launched in, from my (imperfect memory), 2018 to present. Of course, gravel bikes are a new and evolving market segment. There are gravel bikes out there with clearance for not more than 40mm tires, although ...


4

I thought I've seen something like this before... so I googled a bit and found traces of this design, apparently deceased. While it looks clever, I have some doubts that it will work efficiently for any real rain. As soon as the brush is "saturated" with water, incoming drops will cause some of already collected water to detach and continue its way up. It ...


3

Sounds like fun - I'd start by riding on quiet roads, and I'd fit studded tyres to all four wheels. You can swap back to non-studded come summer. Look if your ebike function has a limiter function. You don't want full power else wheel slip. My trailer always gets a skunk stripe on the front, from the rooster tail of the rear wheel. BUT its got a "full" ...


3

I haven't been in an organization that would have considered arranging such event and then decided not to, so this is pure speculation. I have a guess with two reasons: weight and competing activities. First, winter camping requires much more equipment than summer: heavy sleeping bags, warm clothing, fuel, and taken to extreme a tent with stove. These are ...


3

Hey to everyone reading this 4+ years later. I just wanted to add to what people are talking about forks and "Suspended's" mention of the freehub. I just want to add what I've learned from biking for the past 2 years, year round in Ann Arbor, MI. Fork: To me the biggest thing is salt, but since this was about temps and on the slope I would agree that ...


3

Perhaps. There are two main areas of a bicycle prone to damage in truly cold temperatures. The first is your freehub. When the grease in a freehub gets thicker, it can prevent the hub from full engagement. At best this means when you pedal forward, nothing happens. At worst, you can get partial engagement and chip/destroy the teeth inside your freehub, ...


3

After looking at the setups people were using for the arrowhead 135 race in canada that has start temps around -20f, it looked like everyone was using disc brakes. Folks were using hydraulic and cable actuated discs (Avid BB7 is wildly popular). One of the best things for disc brakes (and your shifters) is FULL HOUSING. This will help keep areas where ...


3

Winterize it. If your freewheel or freehub is "skipping" in cold conditions, it is entirely possible the grease inside it is not appropriate for colder conditions. When this happens, it cause the pawls (or other engagement mechanism) to not engage. The free mechanism basically stays stuck in the way it is when you are not pedaling. When this happens ...


3

If conditions were slippery enough that I felt I needed to put a foot down suddenly at any time to prevent a fall, I would probably think it was too slippery to ride at all. That said, SPDs do clip in and out easily, though they may be measurably slower than just lifting your foot off a flat pedal. With most SPD pedals, you can adjust the release tension to ...


3

Adding another answer just as a frame challenge to the premise of the question that being able to put a foot down quickly is relevant to preventing a fall in conditions that studded tires are relevant for. I've gone down twice hitting ice with "winter tires" when clearly I should have had studs. (and as a result always ride studs now...) If your ...


2

All brake types that lock your wheels work. Because traction is required to stop you, spend more on better studded (ice) tires, because once your wheels are locked your tires will help you stop/not. Hydraulic brakes are overhyped. They are more prone to failure when tested in salty conditions due to more small moving parts that can corrode. Mechanical ...


2

You're describing a Fat-Front setup. Cornering on soft surfaces should be improved, as well as shock absorption if you run low pressure, but drive would only improve in the case where the fat front tyre can compact snow enough for the regular rear tyre to dig in less than it would on a standard MTB.


2

When I lived in Ithaca New York, I used tire chains for my RockHopper mountain bike. It made going down the steep slope of Buffalo Street in the dead of winter a bit less terrifying. This brand is called SlipNot but there are others on the market as well. The advantage of chains is that they can be taken off in the Spring. The disadvantage is that you have ...


2

The LED group needs to be waterproof anyways, and it needs to withstand dirt that's thrown at it from the tire at quite some speed. Snow won't penetrate any further than water. Also, since the fender looks very plastic to me, it won't be attacked by the salt that your city may have used to clear the roads. As such, I believe that your LED should be perfectly ...


2

You should be concerned yes, because wet feet are not happy feet. However, this is something your shoe manufacturer should have taken care of. I have owned Specialized and Lake brands of waterproof shoes. I have not ever had problems with water entering through the cleat holes of either (I have owned A LOT of Lake boots). However, that doesn't mean your ...


2

As long as the bike paths and roads you'll be traveling along are reasonably well cleared of deep snow, this would be no big issue. You can order basic Schwalbe Winter studded tires cheaply (around 40euro a pair) from Bike24. You should probably be able to find a basic used bike for 110 euro. Studded tires aren't strictly necessary for winter riding, but ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible