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12

Clipless pedals are great for winter riding, just like any other season. I live in Minnesota and ride year round, and in the winter I ride on the streets, trails, and over frozen lakes and rivers. When I ride, I'm clipped in. You're not at any more risk of suddenly wiping out than mountain bikers are when traveling over unfamiliar terrain. When you do ride ...


11

This depends a lot on the rider. Ultimately you need to judge yourself. Clipless in snow does make a lot of sense. The most important thing when riding on snow is an even and smooth power stroke, whilst also having good control about your weight distribution. Being clipped in makes this a lot easier. You can lower your dropper post a bit, get in a higher ...


8

Another category to search can be "bikepacking bike with drop bars". Examples I can think about: the Decathlon Riverside Touring 920 (not sure it will be available in North America though), Salsa Cutthroat or Salsa Fargo These are 29er with 2.4 inches wheels, drop bar and no suspension. As said, these are bikepacking bikes, so designed to be loaded ...


4

Is the term "gravel" today already tied to, say, 700c-38, and precludes such a lavish size? That's definitely not true of most gravel bikes launched in, from my (imperfect memory), 2018 to present. Of course, gravel bikes are a new and evolving market segment. There are gravel bikes out there with clearance for not more than 40mm tires, although ...


3

If conditions were slippery enough that I felt I needed to put a foot down suddenly at any time to prevent a fall, I would probably think it was too slippery to ride at all. That said, SPDs do clip in and out easily, though they may be measurably slower than just lifting your foot off a flat pedal. With most SPD pedals, you can adjust the release tension to ...


3

Adding another answer just as a frame challenge to the premise of the question that being able to put a foot down quickly is relevant to preventing a fall in conditions that studded tires are relevant for. I've gone down twice hitting ice with "winter tires" when clearly I should have had studs. (and as a result always ride studs now...) If your ...


2

I thought this was quite an interesting question. There are bikes and framesets available to take such big tyres but they are usually for flat bars. If you wanted to build a drop bar gravel bike, you could but with some caveats. I'm using two bikes I'm familiar with to give an example, there are plenty of other choices. A frameset like the Surly Ogre ...


2

The biggest downside of (road) clipless in winter is when you get off the bike. I have SPDs on all my bikes, with mountain/touring shoes. Even with these I've found that summer slick tyres have more grip on unexpected sheet ice than my shoes; your road shoes would be far worse. I normally put my studded tyres on my commuter hybrid (in case of early morning ...


2

The LED group needs to be waterproof anyways, and it needs to withstand dirt that's thrown at it from the tire at quite some speed. Snow won't penetrate any further than water. Also, since the fender looks very plastic to me, it won't be attacked by the salt that your city may have used to clear the roads. As such, I believe that your LED should be perfectly ...


1

If it is cold enough to need studded tyres, most road shoes will be too cold for using. So you'll need thick insulated overshoes as well. I've found that overshoes all interfere with the cleat in some way, or the holes are so large the overshoe is more of a spat and provides insufficient protection I expect that snowy/icy conditions would suit insulated ...


1

My bike was outside all of ten hrs, and when I got on it I couldn't go any where!. My chain was so cold it was just sliding around the cassette. I had to walk home from work. So when I eventually arrived home I poured hot water over the chain and cassette. It done the trick, but it happened again. Its a pain!


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