Hot answers tagged

26

First up, I'd strongly recommend switching to clipless pedals. I had the same discomfort issues you're describing with normal shoes and toeclips and find clipless pedal so much more comfortable and secure (therefore safer). When comparing and evaluating clipless pedal systems, some of the more important attributes are: Float - This is the property where ...


14

Your goal is to apply torque to the cleat as you would with your foot in a shoe. So essentially you need something like a gigantic flat screwdriver. I have a mini crowbar that would do the job, for example, but if you have any metal tyre levers they might be big enough. Slacken off any tension adjusting screw first


11

Practice, practice, practice... You need to move the physical motions of getting out of the pedals from your conscious muscle memory to your unconscious muscle memory. Once it becomes an instinctual unconscious reaction, you'll have far fewer problems. A flat grassy space is good for this. Try doing track stands and un-clip to catch your balance. Or you ...


11

Don't worry about things that haven't happened. Most people new to clipless are worried about the exact opposite. "Will I be able to unclip if things go south in a turn?" Eventually you will get to the point where clipping in/out is completely unconscious. Having said all that, if unclipping when you don't want to really becomes a problem, look into ...


11

You're probably talking about "float", the way your foot rotates over the pedal. This is considered a feature, not a bug. There are different cleats you can get with different amounts of float; looking around, I do see there are "zero float" cleats that you can get for SPDs, and others with only 4° of float. The spring adjusts your release tension, not your ...


10

You have the version of those cranks that came with French pedal threads (M14x1.25). I believe there's enough material to tap them to standard 9/16x20. The difference in diameter is very slight. It's important and not trivial to get the tap going in square.


9

Maybe a better option than an SPD-SL pedal would be something like the PD-M324 from Shimano. It's a dual sided pedal, one side flat, with no cleat required, and one side SPD. They don't make an SPD-SL version of it, though. An SPD-SL pedal, because of the depth of the cleat retention area of the pedal doesn't really offer good, safe traction in trainers. ...


9

There are three main settings on your cleat: Fore-aft position, which should let you pedal with the metatarsal heads over the pedal axle, more or less; Lateral position, which should let a few free milimeters between the inner part of the shoe sole and the crank arm; The most important for you, which is the ANGLE between the longitudinal line of the cleat ...


8

If your bike is set up with a proper fit to your body, and your pedal's cleat position is set up for your body, soreness in your knees like you describe is not normal. Whether the discomfort you are experiencing is simply muscle soreness, as in "I exercised heavily and my body noticed" or whether it requires corrective action, is harder to decide. If the ...


7

Fixed position cleats, or 0 degree float cleats, require far greater precision about cleat setup on the shoe. Failure to get the setup right will mean pain, and can mean injury. That is also true of floating cleats. Most pedals come with cleats that have between 4.5 and 9 degrees of float built in. I don't know of any pedal which has a 0 degree cleat, ...


7

On Shimano SPD pedals, you can sometimes adjust the tension for how tightly they clip in (likely via a hex bolt). If the tension is too low, your feet will be too easy to pop out, whereas if its too high, you won't easily be able to get out (which isn't a problem on an indoor cycling setup). Try playing with this setting to see if you stay clipped in (...


7

Use water-pump-pliers or locking pliers (vise-grip). Grip the cleat and turn it either clock-wise or anti-clock-wise Alternatively a medium sized screwdriver used as a lever at the rear 'nose' of the cleat will pop it out. Mind fingers and eyes, though! It might be a good idea for both methods to reduce the spring tension of the pedal by turning the ...


6

Setting the release higher than your comfort level is asking for trouble.The risk of not being able to unclip while in traffic is just too great.As you get to the point that you are popping out more times than you forget to unclip increase the tension in 1/8 turn increments until you are not unclipping unless you want to.If at any point you feel that you are ...


6

My preference is to start with the pedals wound right back so your feet fall out if you even think about unclipping. But from my experience of novices most people will fall off at least once due to being clipped in. Regardless of how loose the pedals are. After a week or so, or when the learner starts complaining that they're unclipping unexpectedly, I ...


6

Here what you do. Contact Bodybike who makes bikes for spinning. Their pedals have SPD on one side and Look Delta on the other.Just run Look Delta cleats on your road shoes and Shimano SPD on your "everyday" shoes and you're set. https://body-bike.com/catalog/accessories/pedals


6

A cobbler (i.e. a shoe repairman) can glue a new layer of sole (e.g a non-slip rubber sole that's suitable for winter) onto a pair of shoes' existing soles: so perhaps ask a cobbler.


6

Generally the cleats come with some shims for exactly this problem. If you have the box with the original pedals look around for some thin cleat shaped shims. If you can't find them, you can hand make shims out of plastic milk bottles, or ask around at the dealer to see if they have any spares handy.


5

Does an SPD/SPD-SL pedal exist? No, the cleat and retention is mutually exclusive. SPD is a two screw setup, while SPD-SL is a three screw setup... Does an SPD/SPD-SL shoe exist? Yes - these exist. The Shimano SH-R087G, for example. You'll find these lean towards road rather than offroad -- a more rigid sole, and small rubber spots to minimize the ...


5

Although you have opted for a 'proper' road bike, you may want to consider the mountain bike style SPDs. Some of the MTB shoes come close to racing shoes in terms of stiffness, and there are certainly a range of good quality pedals on the market. There are disadvantages (the power from your foot is not spread over as large a pedal area) but the advantage is ...


5

They sell cleat covers you can use to protect the cleats, and the floors you walk on. Most of them are for SPD-SL but (i think) the ones I linked to are for SPD.


5

Shimano make several models of pedals with SPD one side, and flat on the other. So they can be used with SPD shoes or normal shoes. Options include: PD-A530 These are designed for road/touring bikes, so are fairly slim, with a small metal platform. (Not to be confused with the PD-A520, which are one-sided SPD pedals, without a flat platform). Personally I ...


5

Looks like a pair of Forté Carve pedals. Forté is a house brand of Performance Bicycles. I checked their website, but this particular model of pedal doesn't appear to be available any longer. (photo from College Tri blog) Here's another photo that shows the "CARVE" logo with the stylyized "V" engraved into the cross piece that matches the letters you ...


4

I ride about 2500 miles per year, mostly road. At one time, I used SPDs (Shimano SH-51), but I got knee pain from a misaligned cleat. In addition, I prefer to ride with my feet slightly pronated (heels in, toes out, like a duck), so I felt like I wanted more float from my cleats. SPD cleats offer around 5 degrees of float. Too, the shoes I had for SPDs were ...


4

In addition to perhaps adjusting the height further, also have a look to see if the cleats are forcing your foot inwards or outwards. That can cause problems with knee or ankle if it isn't lined up with your natural axis. Some excerpts from bikesplit.com: Optimizing cleat position is crucial to minimize stress through your knees and maximize power output......


4

Short answer, no. SPD and SPD-SL are two completely different systems. Based on what you are asking to get out of the pedal and shoe combination however, going with the shoe you specified (or similar) and an SPD pedal like the following should cover your needs nicely. http://www.rei.com/product/764688/shimano-a530-spd-sport-road-pedals Happy riding!


4

I doubt you will find a way to do this; it would require a shoe with a pretty deep sole to recess the cleats into (that's what SPDs do). Note that the SPD-SLs are pretty similar to the Looks but much more walkable.


4

Generally speaking, when a pedal works its way loose and is ridden for a decent amount of time, it does strip (and thus ruin) the crank arm. The only way you can be sure that the crank arm is good is to inspect it. So I'd guess your crank arm is damaged (especially if its at the point where you can't loosen the pedal). A picture of how its bent in would be ...


4

I am transitioning from mountain bike shoes to road bike shoes. A marked difference is the limitation of versatility in cleat placement. I prefer to have my cleat as far up and to the inner side of my foot as possible - pretty much at the balls of my feet. Typical road shoes use three bolts holes, with the positions of those holes being static (as opposed ...


3

Be very careful about making leg length adjustments on your bike. There are several red flags about this. All of which you may be aware of or may not. 1st, a leg length difference is very difficult to diagnose, ecept with an experienced physio, or an X-Ray/MRI. Most good physios will send you for an X-ray if they suspect a leg length difference is causing ...


3

Tighten the springs up a little if your feet are starting to pop out. Before I moved from SPD's to TIME's I had the SPD's cranked down as tight as they would go and I would still blow out of them and the scars on my kneecaps to prove it :/ The biggest thing you need to do as you tighten the pedals up is to practice clipping in and (especially) out to build ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible