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1

I find this a quite interesting claim in terms of efficiency. Is there more evidence of this, and if yes, why aren't more "city bikes" doing this? There are two factors at play here. Firstly, the seat position. I think you'll find that most bicycles sold have an adjustable seat height. The seat position is very critical and should be correct ...


3

When I consider all the claims made, I believe they are probably true and verifiable... Not once do they tell you what they are comparing their product to, they lead the reader to presume... "You ride faster and your quadriceps have to work less." - compared to what? Walking "- If you have a Kwiggle with you, you will explore cities and ...


1

Thanks to everyone's great help here is the solution that seems like it would work out for me, yrmv (remember this is just a theoretical setup.) Want to stay with as much as OE as I can since just winter setup, 10sp 4700 tiagra levers (same shim 11 sp road cable pull ratios including grx so can't just use any rear derailleur even though is 10sp that gets ...


7

The only road shifter compatible with a Shimano 10 mountain RD is the Microshift BS-M10. If you went BS-M10 you could use TRP Hylex brakes to stay hydro. A number of bikes have been released with those exact components with Shimano 1x10 or 2x10 mountain drivetrains. It works fine if you're amenable to bar ends. Other than the above, to get 1x10 with brifters ...


0

There are two problems in your plan. Firstly, it's almost impossible to find road drop levers for hydraulic brakes without shifters. Thus you're stuck with levers that have integrated shifters. Secondly, in their infinite wisdom, Shimano has made road levers incompatible with the cable pull ratio needed by MTB rear derailleurs. Thus, if you select a lever ...


4

Hydraulic brake levers and brake calipers are in general not interchangable. Shimano MTB 10 speed rear derailleurs do not work with road levers. You already encountered GRX. It has a 2x10 option, RX400. The rear derailleur is not designed for 1x, however, it has a clutch (Shadow+) and is rated to 46t. I expect it will work well enough in a 1x set up. Also ...


4

50km/h = 13.9m/s = 833m/min. Wheel circumference is roughly 2m so that the wheel is spinning at 417rpm. Sealed industrial bearings easily withstand 10.000rpm and more. The steel ball bearings inside even more.


3

Ignoring the skills/strength of the cyclist, the main factors in speed (on level ground) are rolling resistance and wind resistance. (In fact, on level ground weight is only a factor to the extent that it affects rolling resistance.) Rolling resistance is mainly a matter of tires, with narrower, smoother, high-pressure tires being more efficient in most ...


0

Answer: yes rocking the bike helps in a sprint or when pushing hard on a climb. I see that the pros rocking the bike on a real steep part of a hill climb. When I look at many less experienced cyclist, a significant number of them keep their bike vertical while climbing, so their bikes don’t rock, but their bums go up and down. My theory is that the non-...


7

In the end it’s all about your muscle’s power output vs. losses due to drag, rolling resistance and weight (if going uphill). In rotational systems, power is torque multiplied with cadence (angular velocity). So from a physics standpoint it doesn’t matter if you pedal fast in an easy gear or slow in a (proportionally) harder gear. From a physiological ...


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