34

In all likelihood, the cassette is new. The cassette is manufactured this way. The difference in teeth shape and depth is to assist the chain take-up when you change gears. Look for wear marks on the ramps and grime between the cogs - a new cassette should be clean with no marks. While it could be possible to clean a used cassette to 'new' condition, (...


33

A 1x drivetrain (single chainring) is pretty much the standard now in mountain biking - you will notice the rear cassette is much wider than the classic 3x7 setup you are used to. The wide rear cassette gives a wide range of gears (although not always as wide as the old 3x7). Most also have also moved to more speeds(sprockets) in the rear (i.e., 11-12 speed)...


24

As a chain wears out, the distance between links gets bigger (this is what chain wear tools measure). As this is happening, the chain will grind the cogs to match the worn chain (distance between teeth increases). This is why your gears might not feel so bad, but then they get much worse when you put on a new chain. The new chain's links do not line up with ...


21

I think these may be what you're looking for. FYI, a lot of this information is available with a little searching. Depending on what exactly you are looking for, you might want to look up a document for a specific cassette as the numbers might be slightly different. Spacer widths (From Shimano tech docs) 8 Spd: 3.00mm 9 Spd: 2.56mm 10 Spd: 2.35mm (1.0mm ...


17

They are there to help facilitate shifting. Basically, the ramps you see help when going from a smaller to larger sprocket by catching the side plates of the chain to help the chain be pulled up onto the larger cog. Another place where you will see atypical teeth is in the front; some are shorter/different shaped than others to help shifting as well. ...


16

My understanding is that performance-oriented mountain biking has evolved to take on tougher and more technical terrain. If you design a bike specifically for a 1x drivetrain, then all else equal, it should free up some clearance to enable wider tires. This is because you don't have to account for how the front derailleur would otherwise hit the rear tire. ...


12

Shows some wear, but looks OK. All teeth look symmetrical and so do the spaces between them. Really worn teeth look like a swept back shark dorsal fin or develop a visible burr. Do a Google image search for 'worn chainring teeth' and you'll get plenty of examples.


10

Here's a photo of RD-M970 from behind. As you can see, the slotted (guide) pulley goes to knuckle and solid one (tension) to the bottom of cage. I'd align the arrows with chain movement direction that happens when you pedal forward.


9

Here are some points taken from the literature: Mechanical efficiency is usually 88-98% for majority of deraileur systems (when clean,lubricated and new) Drivetrain efficiency decreases with smaller rear cogs, Highest efficiency can be reached at high torques and low cadence, Chainline effects are negligible, imposible to note with measurement apparatus, ...


9

A torque specification is not just a torque-spanner setting but a physical property. That is, there are many ways to apply the correct torque. In this case it means more or less: pull it as tight as you could. One can conclude this from the high torque value and wide torque range. To illustrate this let's find the force F you need to apply to a tool to get ...


8

The cable that moves a mechanical derailleur is counteracted by a spring. To the best of my knowledge the "leave it on the smallest sprocket" theory suggests that the spring is sitting with the least amount of tension on it. The same is true for the cables. Because they have the least tension they are more likely to maintain adjustment over periods of ...


8

I've done the opposite to a lot of riders - I had a chainset of unknown mileage and rather than guess, I simply rode the whole thing into the ground. Shifting got progressively worse over time, but it wasn't linear. There were certain gear combinations that slipped more under normal load, and others that slipped under heavy load. Climbing a grade became ...


8

The configuration is not unusual at all. It has even become quite common, the smaller front ring and the quite wide ranging cassette for decently spread gearing. It also brings a gain of weight, simplifies maintenance and removes complication from shifting. If your riding terrain is not too hilly the steps between the 9 gears should not be too steep, since ...


8

this bike has an 11-42t Microshift cassette with 11-13-15-18-21-24-28-34-42 cogs typically previous 9-speed drivetrains used an 11-34t cassette 11-13-15-17-20-23-26-30-34T. which was updated to 11-36t 11-13-15-17-20-23-26-30-36T However these were typically accompanied with a triple or double chainset. Recent Shimano 9 speed MTB chainsets are 40/30/22 triple ...


7

Chains for modern bicycles all have a 1/2" pitch - the distance from roller to roller or from pin to pin. However, multi-speed bicycles have rollers that are 3/32" wide (or narrower), while many single speed drivetrains (fixies, track bikes, BMX) have rollers that are 1/8" wide. Similarly, there are chainrings and cogs which accommodate wider or narrower ...


7

According to the late great Sheldon Brown, yes you can change an individual sprocket in a cassette, at least for Shimano. Some cassettes have small bolts or rivets holding the gears together, but this is for convenience. Most Shimano cassettes made in the '90s or later have a feature called Hyperglide (probably a registered trademark) that enables smoother ...


7

This has nothing to do with dates. Shimano introduced cassettes on their road racing groupsets first. I.e. Dura-Ace. The first Deore XT lacked this. The first Shimano MTB cassette was CS-M732: https://si.shimano.com/api/publish/storage/pdf/en/ev/CS-M732/EV-CS-M732-0969.pdf This had B-type: 12-14-16-18-21-24-28T C-type: 13-15-17-20-23-26-30T Not sure what A-...


7

Gear inches. Gear inches are, for better or worse, the most commonly recognized way of making the kind of comparison you're trying to make here, which one is harder to pedal. Gear inches are simply how far one complete rotation of the cranks moves the bike forward. The higher the number, the harder it is to turn the cranks. You hear people make reference to ...


7

To answer the question as asked: You'll have a Shimano Nexus gear hub, so you need a sprocket compatible with that. (Any reasonably competent mechanic should have been able to tell you that!) Sheldon Brown has a page on Nexus and Affine geared hubs which includes info on sprockets: https://www.sheldonbrown.com/nexus-mech.html. You should be able to find ...


6

I'm Ryan with Gates Carbon Drive. The fix is not difficult, but there are a couple of things that I would recommend. Simply removing the 4 chainring bolts is not the best course of action. I would recommend removing the rear wheel from the dropout. If you are unsure about this, we have put together a video here: http://www.gatescarbondrive.com/tech/...


6

The key property is hardness. For uniform materials (like cogs), hardness directly affects wear resistance. The harder the metal the longer it will last. Some digging around wikipedia suggests that typical Brinell hardness values are: pure aluminium 15HB, 6061-T6 aluminium (heat treated) 95 HB mild steel 120HB, 4130 CroMo steel 183-217 HB (90-96 ...


6

Tricky one. You will go through several chains before going through a cassette. A worn chain can be measured quite easily with a gauge. Measuring wear on a cassette is more difficult. It is usually the middle set of sprockets which wear first - due to their more frequent use. If examined carefully - you may notice the teeth on them thinning.


6

That's a freehub body. Look on the hub for the model of hub you have, and then you can use that to find the appropriate freehub body model by looking at the documentation of the hub.


6

In that context, Top sprocket is the smallest one on the cassette, which gives you the Top or highest gear. (You would think they would match terms Low and High or Top and Bottom.)


6

Yes, the stretched chain wears the chain ring and sprockets to match its pitch. It's recommended to use a chain gauge (such as this one by Park Tools) so you can replace your chain before it's stretched enough to do significant damage to the rest of the drive train. If you do let the chain stretch too far, you'll need to change the cassette/rear cog and/or ...


6

regarding the amount of teeth on the sprockets/crankset: The ratio between the amount of teeth on the rear sprocket and crankset determines the gear ratio of the bike. Even though you have a gear hub the ratio between the sprockets will still determine your gear ratio. The smaller the sprocket in the back/the bigger in the front the higher your top speed is,...


5

"Chain binding" occurs when the chain is really tight around the sprockets. No set of sprockets is perfectly round and centered (especially if worn a bit), and if the chain is tight at one spot in the rotation it likely will become too tight with another half-turn or so. The pressure of the chain on the sprockets makes the crank more difficult to turn, or, ...


5

It is a derailleur pulley, and fairly worn out one at that. The easiest way to find a fitting replacement is to buy a set from an aftermarket manufacturer that comes with adapter shims for different derailleurs. You can simply try different shims until you find the one that fits. They do come in different teeth counts. From the picture it looks like this ...


5

50/34 with and 11/32 on the rear is going to be very spinny. For me - the range is too wide and the gaps between the gears too big. But - this depends on the kind of riding you will be doing. If you are riding the very steepest of mountains - than the 34/32 combination might be what you are looking for. Purely for fast road work - that's too wide a ...


5

If the Shimano freewheel didn't fit, it means that your bike uses French threading for the freewheel (which isn't surprising given that it has a Maillard freewheel; the other non-bmx standards are interchangable). You're basically out of luck and need a new wheel (or at least new hub). Depending on the hub, you may have to re-space the frame(*), since 6 ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible