Hot answers tagged

10

It's much better to open the chain. Derailleurs are not really designed to be opened repeatedly, and doing so inexpertly can potentially ruin the derailleur. Chains might have either a lock link or a master link of some kind, find that open the chain and then thread the chain through the derailleur. If the chain does not have one of these links, you will ...


8

It is almost impossible to rebuild a wheel (i.e., new hub and new spokes) without removing the tire. Leaving the tire on, would mean leaving the spoke nipples in place. (It is a good idea to replace the spoke nipples when rebuilding a wheel. You will also require new spokes). It is a big hassle threading the spoke into nipples that are stuck in one ...


8

Not entirely surprised you have problems refer here... According to this link, Cable Pull for a Campy 10 shifter is 2.8mm, dérailleur ratio for a Campy is 1.5 (or 1.4 for old) Cassette sprocket pitch for SRam 9 is 4.35. So a single shift on the the 10speed is 2.8*1.5 = 4.2mm (ideal is 4.35). Over a 9 speeds that an error of 1.35mm, so when tuning, you ...


8

For those who aren't familiar, a SRAM Automatix hub is a 2-sped internal gear hub which shifts automatically, with the shift mechanism and everything contained in the hub. The mechanism is mechanical, and there aren't any batteries or anything involved. So, no cables to the back of the bike needed except for a brake cable if you have a freewheel Automatix (...


8

It lengthens or shortens the housing length to adjust the lateral position of the derailleur cage. It's used to adjust derailleur 'indexing' so that the chain sits properly on the cassette sprockets. Mountain bike shifter units have barrel adjusters, road bikes use this one as well as having frame mounted or 'in-line' adjusters some where on the housing run....


8

Modern cranksets either have 24mm-ish width spindles, or 30mm-ish spindles. DUB (28.99mm spindle) falls into the latter category. GXP spindles (24mm, tapered to 22mm on one side) fall into the former. Almost all press fit bottom bracket shells can take cranks with 30mm or similar spindles. Trek’s BB90 bottom bracket standard appears to be an exception. That ...


7

This does not work in the specific case of a Sram CX1 rear derailleur, or the case of any other X-Horizon™ mechanisms. I purchased the CX1 derailleur and attempted with a 46/39 front chainring combo. The CX1 RD allows the front shift to occur, but has no tolerance for changes in chain length (e.g. front shifting). The change in chainring size impacts the ...


7

SRAM acquired Sachs in 1997. The main visible difference between the (Fichtel &) Sachs Torpedo 3 hub and the SRAM T3 is that the SRAM T3 comes in an aluminium body, whereas the Sachs Torpedo 3 comes in a chrome plated steel body and the brake design has been changed (but is compatible). There apparently was a successor model to the Sachs Torpedo 3 ...


7

Unwinding the spring, as the article states, will make the hub to shift when you're going faster. Without touching the internals, the hub will shift at the same speed, no matter how high the cadence is. By changing the chainring-cog ratio you adjust the cadence at which the shift-speed is obtained. So the answer is no, there is slight difference. By doing ...


7

You absolutely need SRAM shift/brake lever units. SRAM road shift/brake levers are compatible with their MTB derailleurs and come in a 1x11 version. Trying to mix Shimano and SRAM will just be a huge headache. I'm not even sure there is a shift cable pull converter for that. Hydraulic vs mechanical calipers is up to you and your budget. Something you ...


7

The thing with CF components is that you can't really tell much about structural integrity without specialized tools and knowledge unless it's obvious from the first glance. Anyway, SRAM carbon fiber cranks have a healthy dose of paint and clearcoat, any damage to those aren't structural. Source: I own a set of S2200 that survived a bunch of pedal strikes, ...


6

If you want to upgrade gradually you need to follow the compatibility of the groupsets. If your Tiagra groupset is the 4600 series of 2012, the 10 speed components should be compatible with other Shimano 10 speed road components, so you can use Dura Ace 7800 and 7900, Ultegra 6600 and 6700, and "105" 5600 and 5700. The amount of cable pull per gear is ...


6

Bad disc brake performance is almost always either air in the lines or oil on the pads. Air makes the levers spongey and oil stops the pads grabbing the disc. Your problem sounds like air, a bleed should sort it out. A bad bleed from the factory is not that uncommon. If you've patience you can try turning the bike so the line is as vertical as possible ...


6

In general, when you see oddly shaped teeth or variations on a cassette/chainring, its there to facilitate shifting (such as Shimano Hyperglide, and ramps/pins you see on chainrings/cassettes; see this link for some examples). In this case, SRAM calls it their "Open Glide" technology. To quote them: "OpenGlide tooth ramping allows for faster chain ...


6

Neither system is better than the other. In some situations, 1x is better, in others, 2x is better. As cassette range expands, effectively because the largest cog is getting bigger, the advantageous of 2x (or 3x) are decreasing. (SRAM just released a 1x12 with a 10-50 cassette, which is probably the nail in the coffin of 2x in the top end gear sets on MTBs). ...


6

For BR-5700, BR-5800, and BR-R7000 they run off the various new school Shimano not-quite-short-pull cable travel numbers. SRAM road levers are all basically traditional short pull, which is less cable pull than Shimano Super SLR et al. The mismatch in this direction results in less pad movement but with more leverage than intended. It can typically be made ...


5

Yep, I've been using such setup for an year now, on my MTB (2x10). See the "Technologies" tab on SRAM's page for X9 RD Type 2. The equivalent technology by Shimano is called Shadow+ (note the +). When purchasing an RD, on can notice, that the price difference between having or not having the relevant technology is relatively small compared to the price of ...


5

Note: this is mostly based on my personal experience. Its an incredibly subjective subject, so there is no right answer. Keep in mind that in reality one level up or down will be completely unnoticeable performance difference to most riders. XT is considered the "Sweet spot" for performance, weight and durability. Probably X9 in the SRAM range. XTR ...


5

BB92 is also known as PF41. The shell width should be 91.5mm and the inner diameter should be 41mm. 30mm: According to SRAM's 1x11 frame fit specifications, the inner part of the XX1 "spider" sits 45.5mm from the centreline (Dimension W1). The equivalent dimension is 43.5mm for X1 cranksets. MTB BBs compatible with Hollowtech 2 should have a fully-...


5

You can use the chainring, but each brand (Shimano, SRAM, etc...) aligns the shifting ramps and pins to work best with their own brands inner rings. So the indexed shifting will not be as fast/smooth as when you would use the same brand of rings together. Inner rings frequently have individual teeth shaped so that the chain will lift off and drop down ...


5

To quote Art's Cyclery: "Eagle drivetrains are not backwards compatible in any way (the exception being SRAM’s direct mount cranksets, which will still require a new Eagle chainring)" and VitalMTB: "SRAM will only make the Eagle chainring in the direct-mount style at first, and we were told it's the only Eagle component compatible with their 1x11 ...


5

You need any inline barrel adjuster.


5

According to this page yes, the hub is discontinued and is no longer available @armb's assumption may be true. They stopped making IGH's and dynamo hubs for the same reason, at the same time. I-light had such a small market share that it didn't even earned to be mentioned.


5

Technically you could, but it's a very bad idea. The two fluids are incompatible and will contaminate each other, forcing you to re-bleed sooner than expected. Whichever solvent you use to clean out the hose of mineral oil, will also be a contaminant for your dot fluid. In addition, you'll need some serious dedication and resolve to make sure you actually ...


5

SRAM and Shimano use different cable pulls and derailleur actuation ratios, so their shifters and derailleurs are nominally incompatible with each other. This Art's Cyclery blog page documents derailleur pull ratios, sprocket spacing and cable pull for a variety of derailleurs. SRAM and Shimano 11 speed mountain use the same sprocket spacing - 3.9mm, so ...


5

In theory, you would want to make sure that the cog-cog distance for each cassette is preferably equal, or at least close enough. You may need to adjust your limit screws as well when changing wheels. Campagnolo maintains variable spacing between its cogs, whereas neither SRAM nor Shimano do. Ergo, while the average cog-cog distance is identical, the actual ...


5

This SRAM video on replacingthe hydraulic hose involves removing all the fluid from the system - the situation you are in now. At the end it says to bleed the brake then links to the standard SRAM bleed process, so presumably that's what you need to do. The standard bleed process is designed to displace all the old fluid with fresh, so the lower syringe must ...


5

Sometimes things like this happen when newer generation components are put on older frames. When Campy 10 first came out, I remember some frames doing it. However, that was usually from hitting the end of a chainstay or seatstay that wasn't offset flat enough with the inside face of the dropout. Your picture shows the chain rubbing against the flat surface ...


5

refer here: https://productinfo.shimano.com/download/pdf/spec/3.1/en Mostly this is MARKETING. Shimano tend to use the same designs for a lot of their products, but typically these are introduced earlier on higher groupsets and are 'trickled down' to lower ones. Also your picture is quite old and SRAM have since complicated it considerably with its 'Eagle' ...


5

SRAM's XD and XDR drivers (their term) don't have splines, unlike Shimano and Campagnolo freehub bodies. Instead, their cassettes screw onto the threaded section of the driver as shown in the image below. They did this to Address the shortcomings of Shimano's Hyperglide (HG) freehub, namely that the small splines got chewed up Because they wanted to ...


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