Hot answers tagged

8

Modern cranksets either have 24mm-ish width spindles, or 30mm-ish spindles. DUB (28.99mm spindle) falls into the latter category. GXP spindles (24mm, tapered to 22mm on one side) fall into the former. Almost all press fit bottom bracket shells can take cranks with 30mm or similar spindles. Trek’s BB90 bottom bracket standard appears to be an exception. That ...


7

The phrase missing here is 'Freehub body'. The freehub replaced the freewheel, mostly, which integrated the sprockets and the ratcheting mechanism. The freehub body is therefore the ratcheting mechanism which goes into the rear hub, and then the cassette fits onto the splines. The Hyperglide system is a marketing term. Related terms used by Shimano include ...


7

SRAM's XD and XDR drivers (their term) don't have splines, unlike Shimano and Campagnolo freehub bodies. Instead, their cassettes screw onto the threaded section of the driver as shown in the image below. They did this to Address the shortcomings of Shimano's Hyperglide (HG) freehub, namely that the small splines got chewed up Because they wanted to ...


6

For BR-5700, BR-5800, and BR-R7000 they run off the various new school Shimano not-quite-short-pull cable travel numbers. SRAM road levers are all basically traditional short pull, which is less cable pull than Shimano Super SLR et al. The mismatch in this direction results in less pad movement but with more leverage than intended. It can typically be made ...


6

Some cranksets are modular. I'm not sure if this is a standard term, but I do mean that the crankarms fit to the spider with a splined interface. Thus, you can replace the spider. Less commonly, on some modular cranks, you can even replace the spindle for a different type, but that's not relevant here (I am thinking Rotor cranks; Quarq isn't this type of ...


5

So after replacing the free hub and didn't help, I looked closer and realized the creaking was happening at the little spline fingers that flare out on the outside of the cassette to hold it in place. Grease did nothing to help, so I finally bought a new xx1 cassette. And wouldnt you know it- the new(er) xx1's (xg-1299's) went to the same lock ring designs ...


5

No, don't do that unless it's to limp the bike home. SRAM says not to and I've seen sufficient evidence it's for good reason. The theoretical/manufacturer-stated reason not to is that the press fit is prone to not being as strong as intended once you've pushed the pin out and back in. The pattern I've seen when people, myself included, do this is that it can ...


5

You have it right. For most installations with 1x SRAM mountain cranks, the -6mm offset is for 135 QR and 142x12, and the -3mm is Boost aka 148x12. The "most installations" qualifier is due to the various asymmetrical rear end designs out there, like for example Cannondale's Ai. Bikes like that shift the cassette over by some amount, so the rear ...


4

If your goal is to convert your 3 gears in the front and 7 gears in the back to a 3 in the front and 9 in the rear this will be quite expensive. A new rear wheel will be required Your current rear wheel uses a screw on freewheel to mount the rear gearset. Nine speed rear wheels use a freehub mounting system with a cassette. You will need a 9 speed rear ...


4

How do you design a shifter and stay on the right side of this? You don't. You design a shifter that with repeated use breaks the cable. Then you expect the user to change the cable whenever it breaks, limping home without gear shifting function if the cable fails during a ride. David Gordon Wilson has written a text about cable fatigue. According to it, ...


4

You will get brakes that work BUT won't be quite as the manufacturer intended because Shimano &SRAM use slightly different pull ratios. Campag and SRAM are supposedly the same, fyi. Does that answer your question?


4

SRAM recalled 7,700 of these hubs due to brake failure in 2019. Evidently the brake pawls were not lubricated properly. According to the company, some of the affected hubs may have been manufactured with grease that gets sticky over time, especially if the bike sits unused for a while or is stored in a hot area. When the grease becomes sticky, the brake ...


4

The most common cause of this with XD cassettes is simple under-torquing of the "lockring"/locking sleeve/whatever you want to call it. SRAM's number is 40Nm. The sleeve turns with quite a bit of resistance inside the rest of the casssette on XD cassettes, which can lead to not having it actually tightened on right as the friction is eating up ...


3

Further research shows there are two systems, Matchmaker and Matchmaker X. My Guide T brakes allow the use of Matchmaker and the new Eagle Shifters use Matchmaker X. It seems as though all of the other Guide brakes (including the R the bottom picture above) use Matchmaker X. I either need to find a Matchmaker clamp adapter like this https://www.sram.com/en/...


3

By design: https://road.cc/content/review/31892-sram-s900-singlespeed-carbon-brake-lever " Feel at the lever would make Goldilocks proud, not too baggy, nor too snappy, in fact just right, but there's no return spring which might be a problem for those that prefer gritty cables." https://www.amazon.com/SRAM-Rival1-Pair-Brake-Lever/dp/B017EET2TE &...


3

I haven't done it, but I am pretty sure it's doable without purchasing a new crank. SRAM shows that switching between AXS 2x and 1x is as simple as changing the chainring: However, if you have AXS Wide 2x, it's 94mm BCD (vs. 107mm), so you will need both a new spider and a new chainring (AXS narrow-wide 1x chainring with 107 ...


2

I just went through the same thing. In the end, after stripping the bolt with a standard p-handle hex wrench and a pipe for leverage (with another pipe over the opposing crank for counterforce), I was able to get the bolt off with a spiral bolt extractor and an Irwin Hanson adjustable tap socket. I used a 24' breaker bar on the socket side and a 36" ...


2

Having fitted a few of these, it works on some bikes better than others. I think this is to do with derailleur bolt drop distance. The derailleur can struggle shifting in and out of the 46. I have had more success using these derailleurs on 11-46t 10sp cassettes with 10sp shifters where the margin for error is better. The size of the front ring doesn't ...


2

I am not, among other things, a bike mechanic, and I haven't touched SRAM's stuff. From what I am seeing, this should be possible in theory, but it may involve giving up the Eagle shifter in place of SRAM's clics. For readers unfamiliar with SRAM, Eagle AXS SRAM’s wireless MTB groupset. I believe that SRAM designed AXS (pronounced "access") a bit ...


2

The exact spec differences: Rockshox Judy Silver vs Fox 34 Rhythm GRIP GRIP refers to the variety of damper, an IFP type Rockshox have a similar damper type, which is called the Charger R or Charger RC, on some of its forks but not on forks like this. Rockshox Judy refers to a 30mm stanchion with 'boost' spacing, and Silver means 'steel stanchions'. Note ...


2

Might be shorter to list what you can keep: Frame and fork(probably, if the OLD spacing is the same) Front wheel Bars and stem Saddle and seatpost Pedals Brakes. You will need to buy or source replacement: Rear wheel hub because a freewheel and a cassette are too different. And its a sad truth that a whole-new wheel might be cheaper than a hub and ...


2

Yes that is grease, in my opinion that is about the bear minimum amount intended to help prevent seizing between the two interfaces. I usually leave it if it is my own bike and just add a bit more additional grease, as most cycling greases will not have any interaction with each other. In a professional setting or working on someone else's bike I would ...


1

While SRAM Rival 22 and Shimano 105 group sets are commonly considered to be at the same comparative level as far as performance, weight, cost and overall performance, that doesn't equate to their components potential to be successfully mixed. At least with an acceptable level of function. Whatever the system, it seems, mixing components from SRAM with ...


1

This is a partial answer. What else you will need: a rear shifter, your Shimano ST-EF41 will not be compatible with SRAM-X9 (as far as I know). On the other hand, SRAM and Shimano 9-spd cassette/chains should be interchangeable, so if you can (virtually) upgrade your Tourney 7-spd to something 9-spd Shimano, you should be able to then replace this something ...


1

Bikepacking.com has an article about "mullet" drivetrains. One of the drivetrains consists of a Rival 1 rear derailleur with a 9-46T cassette. They write: The SRAM Rival 1 derailleur works flawlessly, and even though SRAM specifies the max capacity at 42-tooth cassette cogs, it has no issues with a 46. They even have a drivetrain with a 10-50T ...


1

Some models of SX cranksets are square taper, which will be significantly heavier than a external bearing style crankset. I believe the newer revisions of SX have converted to DUB though, bringing them inline with the rest of the EAGLE lineup. For GX, you can choose between aluminum and carbon, while X01 and XX1 only come in carbon. SX and NX only come in ...


1

The major difference is the materials, such as steel or aluminum chainring, the level of aluminum used in the crankarms and the way they are machined. All of which does lend to the overall weight of the crankset. See below for a side by side comparison as well and pictures of each in which you can see the difference in the chainrings and the amount of ...


1

While I don't speak Dutch, the link you provided seems to be for a 46t outer ring from a 2x system. If you look closely enough at the photo you linked, you can also see "46/33T" etched on the ring: that's the smallest chainring option that standard Force AXS offers (Force AXS wide goes down to 43/30). You can see that more clearly in the photo ...


1

Road cranks are not going to work on your MTB. The crank arms include the crank axle - one of the arms is permanently attached to the axle. The axle length is important. Road bikes use narrower bottom bracket shells than MTBs and hence have shorter axles.


1

With a 1x system, any practically sized chainring will work. Do you already own this derailleur? I expect that you can probably get this to work with a 46T cassette, but my suggestion would be not to buy a new one with that intention. Hacking bike parts is great fun, my hobby. But when you are buying something new you should buy it for its intended purpose....


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible