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14

Almost all stems (aside from a few very expensive carbon ones!) are designed to be mounted either way around. The pressures are in the same direction regardless of which way up it is. (they're just reversed) They are designed to be used either way up, otherwise manufacturers would need to produce double the number of stems to create positive and ...


14

Just replace it. The part is called quill stem, it is not threadless-compatible, and it is still widely used. The only type of quill stems I heard of have 1 inch diameter, so you can just find one that is of the same/similar height and length. The simplest is to take it to a local bike shop and they will do it for you. If you want to replace it yourself, ...


12

Here's how I would fix the problem. This could all be done by somebody with basic tools and basic knowledge. Get a quill-threadless stem adapter and a new stem. This will allow you to fit the new stem to the handlebars without removing anything from the bars. The old stem can be removed destructively by removing the cinch bolt and prying the thing apart ...


10

Short answer: probably. As long as the stem and handlebars are metal, or composite that can handle the stress of the reversed position you're not going to have mechanical problems. Long answer: Unless you are riding with your hands off the handlebars what matters is the position of your hands relative to the steering axis. As long as your hands are a ...


10

I have reversed the stem to bring the bars closer. I found no difference in steering or safety. If a reversed stem is needed, use it without worry. My answer is specific to "cruiser bars," or "cow horn bars" that do not interfere with the top tube.


10

Quill stems are in general better for adjustment -- you have far more height adjustment than using a quill to threadless adapter like this: You'll probably end up combining the threadless adapter with an adjustable stem like this: in order to tweak the adjustment. They do make adjustable quill stems: which will give you more adjustability for height and ...


10

What you have now is a bit of a hack, but it could be good temporarily so long as you don't over-stress things somehow, and if you can tolerate the lower handlebar. (Note, I haven't seen how your stem is cracked and so can't tell how bad the situation is.) It's not likely to fail catastrophically (so long as you're not hot-dogging on the thing) but the ...


10

The cap and bolts are readily available, if you want no need to stick to a boring round black thing - they come in all sorts of weird and wonderful shapes, colours and functions. You can get them with bottle openers and clocks. The cap and bolt is only needed to set the preload on the bearings when installing the stem. Once the stem bolts are done up, the ...


10

Here are a few diagrams I drew in Autodesk Fusion 360 to explain how these zero-gap stems work. According to the instructions provided with the few zero-gap stems I've encountered, you should tighten the "no gap" bolts to full torque first, then alternate between the lower bolts to fasten the handlebar. That makes sense according to the diagrams ...


10

One or more of the three options Change the stem to one with an angle, with such a short stem height gain will be limited. Replace the bars with a riser bar, these will give up to 40mm, maybe more of you shop around A stem extender (proviso - not on a carbon steerer). Presuming no carbon parts (bars, stem or steerer), replacing these is well within the ...


9

I'd call that part garbage, sorry. You've overtightened it enough to tear apart the metal, and that toothed flange is probably custom. I would suggest replacing the whole unit with a different brand. The one pictured APPEARS to be a threadless stem, but with the steerer clamp down below and the hinge/knuckle up on top somehow. This is quite unusual. ...


9

This really is an opinion more than a factual question. That you still have three bolts means its held together, but it was designed with 4. So there's a non-zero chance another bolt will go because the load is increased. Look at the Arecibo cables just last week for an example of how quickly things can fail. Nobody can categorically say "that is safe&...


9

Yes this is correct. Once the stem bolts are tight, they hold the system together. The top cap can be loosened without releasing the preload. You could try it out and you should find that the stem remains fixed and no play will develop. You'll still need the top cap next time you want to preload the headset, so perhaps not redundant... maybe furloughed is a ...


9

You can get another handlebar with a different value of "rise": There are models with very high rise: You can go to the extreme (might be very flexy, but OK for e.g. commuting):


8

In practical terms, it's impossible to tell for sure in a case like this. It's probably fine, but there's no way of knowing absolutely via visual inspection. The surface indentations from the stem windows do occur naturally even with consistently correct torque on the fasteners. They're pretty normal to see. It would be a good idea to get it as clean as ...


8

This is a traditional quill stem, meaning it's shaped like a "7", with the vertical part fixed inside the steerer tube by a wedge bolt. There should be an allen bolt at the top--it looks like it might be covered by a rubber plug here. Loosen that and give it a light tap with a mallet to dislodge the wedge. You should then be able to raise the stem. ...


8

Whether they work: Short answer yes, they do not have major widespread problems. Most problems that do occur are related to undertightening the bolts on them to start with, or adjusting them without following the right sequence (on the ones with the out-of-view bolt underneath the extension) or without proper torque or lubrication. Most of them are designed ...


8

Answer this question for yourself: WHEN the stem fails, what's going to happen to me - AND EVERYONE AROUND ME? And only ride in ways that you're willing to live with the answer to the above question. Because when that stem fails, you're probably going to lose control of your bike and have a really hard time stopping - or worse, a really easy time stopping, ...


8

As noted, the cap is theoretically not needed to hold the stem in place, but in the rare situation you need a stem adjustment on the road/trail you'd have a hard time of it. I've removed a spacer above the stem to be used on a different bike after tightening the stem bolts and never had a problem riding on singletrack. But I put the cap back on, for the ...


8

You can buy a handlebar riser adaptor like this:


8

No, just move any spacers from below the stem to on top of it. Don't cut the steerer in case you want to sell the bike later, or even if you change your mind later.


7

There isn't always one size frame which fits a person well in a given model line of bikes (there may be 2 or more - probably 2 if someones on the border of sizes). In some cases, you can get multiple models to fit by swapping out stems and seatposts and saddle and handlebar adjustments or swaps. However, this is highly dependent on the particular model of ...


7

This is your stem. As you can see, it is the whole unit from the bars to the top of the fork, including the adjustable bit in the middle. Most dan't have this and I think this is where the confusion is coming from. To remove your bars for packing, it is usual to remove the 4 bolts on the face plate on the stem. That is the part immediately touching the ...


7

Most likely you are describing a spacer, but it is not clear. The spacers should not spin. If they do, it's a sign that the bearings have little or no pre-load and the head set will be loose. Couple possible causes The pinch bolts were not loose when the top cap was tightened. You are missing a spacer. If you want to lower the bar, you move a spacer from ...


7

The main advantage is aerodynamics, but it should also be cheaper, lighter and stronger than a two-piece combination. Aside from the shaping, the fibres will run continuously through both "parts" so there's extra strength from that and there are also no stress risers at the joins making them stronger again. In practice the strength and weight are a trade-off,...


7

That's the fork steerer. The fork has to be replaced if you want it taller. That, or perhaps, you could add another spacer to gain a marginal 10/20mm.... Replace the forks if you're desperate. Once you unbolt the stem, the forks can just drop out if you're not careful. Replacing the forks may not be economical to replace, and if so, I'd replace the whole ...


7

You first have to remove the quill stem. To remove you undo the bolt from the top (blue arrow), and then you will probably need to tap it lightly with a hammer to push the bung nut out the bottom so it's loose enough to remove. Once you remove the stem, you need to remove the headset lock nut (red arrow). Once this is removed, you can remove the headset nut/...


6

Any frame can support a range of rider sizes by adjusting (among other things) the seat post and stem. However, as you might suspect, there are compromises to be made. And, there are limits to how big of a rider can fit on a given frame. I'll explain a bit more below to illustrate these points. You can adjust the seat post by making it higher (may ...


6

This is a very good question, and one that a lot of people get wrong or approach thoughtlessly. The answer is no, it's not significantly different in terms of safety whether your stem got where it is using an extender versus an uncut steerer. The spacer stack restrictions on carbon and aluminum steerers are concerned with limiting the amount of leverage ...


6

Adjustable stems follow a couple different design schemes, all of which involve some interlocking toothy bits that hold the angle in place. If the angle isn't changing, the toothy bits are still locked together. There's probably a bolt on the underside of the stem extension. If so, that's what locks the angle adjustment in place. So you loosen the side ...


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