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33

Not answering your actual question, but this might be useful to you. To get a bike through narrow or awkward spaces, hold the handlebars and pull it up onto its rear wheel so it is pointing straight up. It relatively easy to balance a bike like this and push it around on its rear wheel while holding the handlebars. In this orientation it's about as wide as ...


21

This depends a lot on the city; different cities allow you to lock up to different things, and have different crime rates. For example, I've been to major European cities where a lot of the bikes were happily locked where they would have been stolen in minutes in New York City. I'd first start by removing things that could be easily stolen (lights, ...


18

A lot will depend on the construction of the helmet. For example the basic material in the helmet will be some sort of sponge or foam which relies on its texture to absorb sudden impacts; does this degrade over time? For example, a loaf of bread gets its texture from the tiny air bubbles formed while rising and proving, but if left to prove too long, the ...


17

Forget the tarp. Ultimately, the greatest danger to your bike is not the weather, it's thieves. As long as you invest in a good lock, practice good locking technique, and don't live in an area full of degenerates you should be fine. My bike is worth more than $1000 and I ride it all over and lock it up outside frequently. When you select your bike, don't ...


17

You'd have to calulate the actual forces to be 100% sure but it's not going to be a problem: forces on front wheel/fork/headset while e.g. just sitting on the bike, braking or landing jumps will be (much) higher than the force applied from hanging it. That being said, I do note at least two problems with this setup: first, good luck getting one of the ...


15

I don't think that this should be a problem. The force that is transferred through the seatpost to the bike when you sit on it and ride some bumpy road is vastly more than the stress that your bike might get from hanging on the bike stand.


15

@rclocher3's electrical tape is the easier way to go, but I often use strips of old tube to wrap things of this nature. To keep the wrap in place I dab some vulcanizing fluid hither and thither along the underside. This saves electrical tape for electrical things, is perhaps a bit more rugged than tape, and also provides fodder for people who would mock me ...


14

It would depend on the bike itself. The electronics on a high end e-mountain bike are pretty much waterproof, and the bike itself is susceptible to the same issues as any bike from rain etc. Regardless, any bike will have its life and service intervals shorten by being left in the rain. I'd suggest a small shed to store the bike in or at least covering it ...


12

While I agree that there are no real risks to string your wheels by the rim, there are a number of DIY and commercial wall mounted racks for hanging wheels at the axle. Wheelzrack makes one good option, and even integrates a storage shelf for shoes and helmets. They support up to for sets of wheels, which may be a good option in your case. Feedback sports ...


12

I don't see a problem hanging a bike from a carbon fiber composite rim. The amplitude of the load would be much, much lower than when riding over even moderate bumps. OK, the load is radially outward rather than radially inward but the wheel is not weak in that direction. Maybe of the inside edge of the rim is particularly narrow in profile you could damage ...


11

To answer the Kvartal question: no, but in practice if you don't have studs it will be fragile and over time you're likely to pull the screws loose or right out of the wall. If the rack doesn't match up with your studs use a backing board attached to studs and you'll be fine - even a length of 1x4" timber would probably be enough. Don't use any of the ...


11

You don't say what other uses you have for the garage, but lets presume the floor space is a premium, otherwise a row of bikes racks is the obvious, cheap and best solution. 7 bikes will fit into 5 meters, and stick out about 2 leaving plenty of space . But you have 3.5 meters high, use it.... Rope pulley from the roof for as many bikes as you need to free ...


11

I would start by just trying to pump up the tires and see if they hold air. Then put some basic lubricating oil on the chain and gears. That should be enough to make it basically rideable so you can use it. Once you are riding, you can decide what is most urgent to work on next.


10

It might even be better than standing it on the same patch of tyres, if it's not being ridden at all, especially if you're not checking the tyre pressures.


10

To add to Michael's comment if it's your property you can't be forbid to bring a bicycle into your apartment, unless it's somehow unlawful to be in possession of said bicycle. Would you be forbid to bring a crank set or a pair of wheels or a bar set into your apartment? Why would you be forbid to bring those things assembled in a certain way into your ...


10

I'd be very tempted to make a tool roll. You'll need access to a sewing machine that can handle 2-3 layers of canvas, but even most home machines will do that if you're careful (and buy a canvas needle!) You see them mostly today with sets of ring spanners, made of cheap plastic. But in the older days people would generally make them out of canvas, often ...


10

Could this cause me to have brake problems Yes: The weight of your bike will pinch the cable and slowly cause the cable to lose its structural integrity and become damaged: They are designed to take stress along them (tensile strength), not laterally (shear strength)... hence how they can withstand huge amounts of force from braking yet can easily be cut ...


10

I successfully keep a cheap old bike in a theft-prone area. I'm on my second in 4 years because the first deteriorated, not because it was stolen. I use a good D-lock (it cost about as much as the bike, that is £/$/€30-50) through both chainstays to a bike rack. This secures the back wheel as well as the frame. The front wheel has a cheap cable lock ...


9

Don't use poison. It will likely not work. Would you be able to remove a dead spider from your bike anyway? How would you know it was dead? Poison is bad for other insects and animals in general. It's bad for you. I believe it's against the spirit of biking too. I don't think a bike cover will work for you. You will give spiders another place to hide. Even ...


9

It doesn't matter for any perspective aside from convenience -- usually the most convenient gear to store it in is the gear you're going to use first when you start riding again.


9

No, there are no problems with doing this. Bike shops frequently hang bikes in a similar way. And when I lived in small house in the inner city, I hung all of the family bikes in a similar way for years, without observing any problems. It's remarkably easy to get the bike up onto the hook or peg, when you learn how. Those in the picture don't look as ...


9

From Shimano Service Instructions: When turning the bicycle upside down or on its side the brake system may have some air bubbles inside the reservoir tank which are still there when the reservoir tank cover is replaced, or which accumulate in various parts of the brake system when it is used for long periods. The M755 disc brake system is not ...


8

Dry and cool place is the way to go. But also play attention to other items stored near the tubes. Do not store them near paint or solvent containers. Many chemical products can damage tubes, even just the vapours. Anything like gasoline or other fuels should be avoided. They chemically degrade rubber and can easily render them useless. Gasoline vapour for ...


8

I store my bicycles this way for the summer (winter fat tyre bikes) and winter (non-commuter mountain and road bikes). I haven't ever had any issues with this and the shop I worked at previously stored all the most expensive bikes this way as well (less expensive bikes were warehoused). I haven't ever had any issues where my brakes suddenly didn't work ...


8

Your plan sounds pretty sane to me. Depending on how tolerant your parents are, I would prefer to leave the bike intact and open to the air, so it can dry if it gets damp, but that may not be possible. I returned from uni, a long time ago now, and dug out my old mountain bike. It hadn't been prepared for 3 years on its own but came out just fine, less a ...


8

You can get wooden storage sheds for bicycles for around £150 - £200. You'll also need something to secure the bike to. You could install a ground anchor, either the screw in type: Or the type that you embed in concrete:


8

Vast majority iof carbon rims will be fine taking the weight of a bike. If yours have very fragile fairings and its not suitible, a couple of options that are common come to mind. Hang from bars and seat Hang from frame Can't find an image - hang from handle bars with seat to the wall and wheels sticking out, can hang from just the seat. You can get any ...


7

Nope, not a problem. The stress on non-moving components comes from repeated cycles of loading and unloading, not from static force. As others have pointed out, keeping the tires unweighted might help lengthen their life in storage, though it should make no difference with the bearings since they're metal on metal with no movement. The only thing you'd ...


7

You will not damage a suspension fork by hanging it upside down. Although the fork is air sprung it also uses oil for dampening in one of the legs. Oil may leak if your seals are degraded. The seals in suspension forks are made to ensure they don't react with the suspension oil. The oil will actually help lubricate the seals. This is the same for coil (...


7

This depends on your wallet and level of risk aversion. Most people with nice bikes tend to baby them by having a beater bike for commuting that is ugly, won't get stolen, and they won't worry about if it starts rusting up or gets road grime on it. Since you already have a beater, why not keep it?


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