Hot answers tagged

12

I don't see a problem hanging a bike from a carbon fiber composite rim. The amplitude of the load would be much, much lower than when riding over even moderate bumps. OK, the load is radially outward rather than radially inward but the wheel is not weak in that direction. Maybe of the inside edge of the rim is particularly narrow in profile you could damage ...


11

I would start by just trying to pump up the tires and see if they hold air. Then put some basic lubricating oil on the chain and gears. That should be enough to make it basically rideable so you can use it. Once you are riding, you can decide what is most urgent to work on next.


10

A roof is better than no roof, but not as good as an enclosed space because wind can blow through bring dust and dirt and moisture. Sunlight is also a source of slow continuous damage. For years I kept bikes under a carport that was also sheltered from the sun, and while they still rusted, it was much slower than if they were out in the weather. If safety ...


8

Vast majority iof carbon rims will be fine taking the weight of a bike. If yours have very fragile fairings and its not suitible, a couple of options that are common come to mind. Hang from bars and seat Hang from frame Can't find an image - hang from handle bars with seat to the wall and wheels sticking out, can hang from just the seat. You can get any ...


7

The biggest issues you will have when you store a bike for a long time in a warm and dry environment (you haven't stated where the bike will be stored) will be: The tyres going flat Dust For the tyres going flat, if you leave them flat for a long time with the weight of the bike on them, you will ruin the tyres. Most tyres won't do well with being bend at ...


7

Some carbon wheels, like the Hed Jet and the Bontrager Aeolus Comp, have an alloy rim, and a non-structural carbon aerodynamic fairing bonded to that rim. "Non-structural" means I can bend the fairing by pushing it lightly with my finger. I've tried this (very lightly) on my Hed Jets. These wheels certainly can not be hung by hooks. That fairing is ...


6

Not going to do anything, unless the bike weighs 300 lbs or something. Worst case if you're hanging and removing repeatedly you could scuff the paint, from the housing rubbing against the frame. But of course, your mounts pose the same risks.


5

The main difference is that the tent gives almost no protection against thieves, where a shed gives a little more protection as it is. And a shed can be improved a lot with a simple anchor ring which you fix to the ground or through a wall so it is very hard to remove, and to which you lock your bikes. A well set up tent of a decent quality will keep the ...


5

The self-adjustment is a valid concern. The way that's implemented is through the drag and elasticity of the piston seals. Holding those seals in the extended position for long periods could lead to gradual elastic deformation of the piston seals (reducing their ability to retract). It could also result in the seals gradually creeping back down the piston ...


4

keep it outside most of the year If by keep it outside most of the year you mean that it will be stored outside but you will ride it and maintain it then outside storage is not as damaging. If by keep it outside most of the year you mean stored, rarely ridden (once a month or less) and not maintained then you will see damage. I've seen many bikes that were ...


4

If you do it often it could scratch the frame’s paint or damage the cable over time. I don’t think it will have any other ill effects. It’s basically the same as if you’d set the cable length or tension a few millimeters too short. You could unhook the cable at the brake (no need to open the clamping screw). Why don’t you hang it from the saddle?


4

Being from a rainy country with a zillion bicycles and most of them parked outside, I would say: Leave the tires, they'll be fine for a while Remove the rust from the chain as much as possible and then lube it The same goes for the cassette Clean the derailer itself thoroughly Extra care should go into the cables for the brakes and derailers; those are ...


3

I would replace the tires and tubes. The bulk of the rust can be eliminated by scrubbing chain and cogs with oxalic acid (sold in paint stores as "wood brightener"), or with some other reasonably credible rust remover. However, the brake and shifter cables and housings are likely rusty and will need to be replaced (though I have rescued them by ...


3

I would periodically spin the tires round, run the pedals round a bit and wiggle the deraillurs back and forth, to prevent them from getting seized up (my rear gear cable snapped when I went out for my first ride in 6 months recently). Some WD40 on the deraillur mechanisms would probably be a good idea too - you don't need to do this once a week.


3

Tarp sounds a good idea as the ready made covers seem to not have waterproof seams. Critical thing I wanted to mention is this: make sure your bike and cover are both bone dry before putting the cover on. If the bike is wet, a cover will CAUSE corrosion. A bit of moisure on the outside of the cover is ok.


2

Another reason tents are a bad idea for long term storage is that very few will last long in the sun. Canvas is better than synthetic, but would cost more than a shed. I've had caravan awnings up for months on end, and use groundsheets to cover garden toys, and all go brittle eventually, then tear and fall to bits. Even in my rather cool, damp climate, one ...


2

Do An Assessment You can't tell what it will take to get this bike going by looking at it. Start with a thorough assessment of the bike so that you have a clear picture of what it's really going to take to get this bike going. Get it working enough using a spray lubrication that you can turn the crank, shift the gears and test the brakes. Air the tires and ...


2

Can a pump that is not being actively used fail? On the one hand - nothing lasts forever. On the other hand - you don't need your cache of pumps to last forever. You only need your cache to last: Until you stop riding Until you find something else that works as well or better So, let's say best case scenario, you need your cache of pumps to last 40 years (...


1

You want to protect your bikes from: elements; thieves. A tent offer no protection from thieves, but let's assume it is not an issue. Not all elements are equal. SUN A bike can stand UV (the sun) quite long, let's say up to 5 years (especially counting are summers). A tent will not stand that many years (i.e. summers) of UV rays. WIND Unless you are living ...


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