40

The single-legged fork must truly withstand heavier bending forces than conventional forks, simply due to physics and asymmetricity. But because of its different construction, the fork is actually stiffer than most 2-legged. Pros The top is attached like a dual crown downhill fork, which is much stiffer than a single-crown. The wheel axle is one-piece with ...


28

First off, when riding over rough terrain you should be hovering above your saddle, not sitting on the saddle. This holds whether riding a hard tail (no rear suspension) or riding a full suspension bike. If you are sitting you have less ability to move your weight around, and therefore less control of the bike. When sitting it is easy for a large bump to ...


22

Specific answers to your questions: Does suspension reduce acceleration? Yes, for two reasons. Suspension causes bob, where some of your pedal power goes into flexing the suspension with each pedal stroke. That power does not spring back out and help you, it is lost. This can be helped if your suspension has a lockout function, which is like an off-...


21

The main reason I've seen is that police bikes are generic mid-price mountain bikes, and those almost always come with suspension. Even when they're decorated and packaged as "police bikes", they still seem to start out as mid-price generic MTBs. This comes from the requirement that they be reasonably rugged, able to have police kit bolted on, be reliable, ...


17

There are a couple of reasons. The KISS Principle If anything vital breaks while you're touring and you can't fix it on the spot, you're stranded. You're too far from home to call your mom for a ride. Unless you have a spare for the broken part, your options are some DIY jerry rigging and/or praying that someone with a truck comes by who will carry you and ...


16

Bouncyness* may not be the appropriate term for the behavior you need from your suspension. Suspension has two main functions: Shock Absorbing and Dampening. Shock absorbing is what the fork does by compressing, allowing the wheel to travel upwards. In this process, kinetic energy from the shock is used to compress either a coil spring or an air spring. ...


16

Although this isn't explicitly part of your question, I'll go ahead and throw it in as it's one of the most important factors to consider in terms of increased suspension if you plan on pedaling your bike- the basic principle behind propelling a bike is to convert a mostly downward force (pedaling) into forward momentum (the drivetrain turning the back wheel ...


16

Benefits of suspension forks (city/gravel road use): Remove chatter from bumpy roads Take the jar out of major bumps Better traction Drawbacks of suspension forks: Entire bike is heavier, leading to a less agile bike. A bike with suspension (all else being equal) will hit more holes and hit them harder. It will also climb like a pig and accelerate ...


16

Apart from going the high-tech route of a front suspension with lock-out, you can also try to get wider tires. The slow-down of wide tires is not that big, but they naturally even out high-frequency bumps. The wider the tire, the smoother your ride gets on the rough roads. Maybe, that's all you need.


15

Suspension is a well-established concept nowdays, and is not bleeding edge. Police bikes will be serviced routinely, and all the preventative maintenance will keep them ready to ride and perform as expected. I agree that additional weight will slow them down a bit, but a cop on a bike isn't going to be chasing down cars. At best they will be operating in ...


14

Even if you're regularly riding up and down kerbs you don't need rear suspension. If you did, people wouldn't ride hardtail mountain bikes on the trails, where drop-offs considerably higher than kerbs are normal, as are step-ups. And even with my limited skill that's all possible on a hardtail (nothing massive). Suspension forks add weight, and this will ...


14

The position of shock mounts is only one variable of many of the rear linkage design. It does not play an isolated role but really is tied to everything else. You might have missed that there are many other designs. The upper mount can be on the top tube as well: Or really, in many other places, like in-line with the seatstays: Or pretty much hidden just ...


13

Less expensive forks have a mechanical lockout. This type of lockout is only usable when the fork is unweighted. Think of it like trying to deadbolt your door when it's still ajar. Higher end forks- coil or air- use a hydraulic lockout. There's a lot going on inside them but to simplify things a bit, there are two valves in the damper of most mid-high end ...


13

Short and simple... Nobody with the cash to spend on a high end touring bike thinks they are worthwhile. Given the increasing specialization in the bike market, they only reason they don't exist is nobody will buy them.


12

Mid range touring bikes come with shocks because because mid range consumers will buy them. Department store bikes come with full suspension because people buy them. High end touring bikes don't come with shocks because high end consumers don't see the value. A bicycle does not need to be used for how it is classified/designed. I use a cyclocross with ...


12

The unsprung weight thing is a myth for the most part. Cast aluminum and magnesium lowers are extremely light, for example, old marzocchi 66 ones were only 3/4 of a pound, total weight. It's not as if the stanchions, dropouts, lower-internals and anything other parts are weightless on an inverted fork, then you have to compare the weight difference with ...


12

You definitely don't need rear suspension: that's for serious off-road riding. For riding on the road and the very mild hardly-off-road-at-all riding you're proposing, rear suspension just adds a lot of weight and it flexes as you pedal, which uses up some of your power. Also, it's a complex system that gives you about five more things to go wrong on the ...


12

Manufacturers design the bike suspension with specific characteristics in mind. For example, should the bike be more poppy or plusher and ground hugging to ride. One parameter in this process is the leverage ratio curve of the rear wheel (Wheel Travel/ Shock travel over the whole travel range). There are many more parameters, but I won't go into details, ...


11

I'm told rear suspension is not a must have That's right, there is even a category in Down Hill races called "hard tail", for people with, well, hard-tail bikes. And they kick some serious arses with those bikes. What is the ride like without rear suspension, what do I lose? You have to pay attention where you put that rear wheel on. With a full, you ...


11

As technology goes, seal and wiper advance to the point that boots on fork stanchions becomes obsolete, for both economical and practical reasons. The seal has advanced to the point that air suspension fork was possible and economical, leaving alone keeping dirt and grimes off the suspension. So the answer is Technical obsolescence Edit: And as @...


11

There is one more reason to add. They will be on the bike all day, every day, 4 days a week (or more). Around here, bike cops are used quite a bit "down town" and at almost all events in the area. These cops have to ride their bikes for hours at a time. A normal shift (around here) is 4 9 hour days, then 3 days off. By comparison the Tour de France's ...


10

I'm assuming this is your bike and you really mean that you've removed the fork from the bike as disassembling the fork isn't really something you do by mistake. The specs I found say that you've got a threadless stem and sealed bearing headset. This is easy to reattach. There are 3 or 4 bolts you need to be concerned with. One right at the top, that goes ...


10

There are seatpost shims available for a few dollars. You should get them easily in your local shop or online. I use an aluminum shim in one of my bikes with exactly the dimensions you need, it works flawlessly and looks very clean. I got it for about 3.50 € (5$).


10

I've serviced the brain on my 2006 sworks stumpy several times over the past few years, mostly because of the crummy turnaround times from spesh, and the fact that it never makes it through more than half a season before losing lockout etc. And the fact that I'm a mechanical engineer and stupidly tear into anything that breaks thinking I can handle it (half ...


10

DO NOT DRILL HOLES IN YOUR FORKS That would weaken them substantially and run the risk of them breaking under stress (e.g., when you hit a pothole). A broken fork will probably put you in the emergency room, and potentially the morgue if you're unlucky with vehicles nearby. Hopefully, other answers will address how to fix your forks; worst case is ...


9

It really depends how deep the scratch is. If it's deep enough, then a new CSU (crown-steerer unit) is the only sure-fire fix. However, here are some steps I've taken in the past, which have given me some success: Sand the scratch down to remove the burrs. You can use super-fine wet & dry paper for this; something like 2000 grit should do the job ...


9

You can easilly find the manual just by googling the visible words from your photo "Marzocchi Bomber 2001", for example https://www.manualslib.com/manual/1728712/Marzocchi-Bomber-2001.html Adjustments are on page 10 and in detail from page 24. A schematic picture is on page 14. There are air and coil variants. What you can adjust in the air ones is the ...


8

Proviso - my advise presumes you are not looking at forking out $2K or more for a bike, and probably significantly less. At a high price point I might suggest suspension. I also presume the gravel section is well maintained with average (pea - grape) size gravel (Where I ride, we sometime use logging roads, the "gravel" is stones about 2"-3" across.), and ...


8

To expand on Batman's comment, its a BSO because its from walmart and built down to a price from low grade components. So, the forks will not be user-serviceable. They won't be serviceable at all even by a shop, and the only way to adjust them is to change them completely. How do we know its a BSO? Because the specs say things like "Tyres, 29 inch" ...


8

To make suspension effective, it must decouple light-weight moving parts from heavy stable parts. For this reason it is most effective to suspend the wheels - they will move fast up and down, while the frame and the rider will not move vertically. A suspension stem is not very effective because it does not carry much vertical load. A suspension seat post is ...


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