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-4

My front and rear wheels needed truing, so I picked up tools to do it. Rims are DT Swiss R460: 20 spokes front, 24 back. Max spoke tension is 1200N. Ouch! 1200N is a reasonable spoke tension for a 36-spoke wheel. To keep 20 spoke wheel in tension, it would need 2160 N tension, and to keep 24 spoke wheel in tension, it would need 1800 N tension. That ...


3

Yes, it’s normal for spoke tension to decrease when the tire is inflated. First of all I’d use much more tension and try to get it more even. Currently you have about 30% difference between slackest and tautest spoke, which is a lot (I’d aim for ~10%, but I’m a perfectionist in that regard). 540N on the slackest rear spoke before you’ve even inflated the ...


2

It's normal. You can corroborate by letting the air out of your tire and measuring then. The whole thing is one of the reasons tension balance is important; outliers that still seem to have a decent amount of tension on them can be brought to slack by this effect. I would work on getting the tension balance tighter. Low spoke count wheels are not forgiving ...


1

The wheel has 32 spokes total, made of steel Good! Although for even better results, 36 spokes would be optimal for 700C (622mm bead seat diameter) wheels. However, using 36 spokes would require new hub and rim. I hope it's stainless steel. If not, you have an opportunity to replace the spokes with stainless ones. each spoke has a width of 2mm across all ...


8

Another common cause for spoke breakage at the J bend is low spoke tension, or preload. As you ride, the bike momentarily "hangs" from the topmost spokes on the rim. Because its a dynamic changing system, this load hands off to the next spokes around quickly. So every wheel revolution, a spoke is pulled tighter and then relaxed. If the spoke is ...


10

The grooves/enlargement shown at the hub are all normal. The path to a wheel that doesn't break spokes is use premium quality spokes (DT, Sapim, and Wheelsmith are the usual poster children), set their line properly at the rim and hub, and stress relieve them properly during building. Fatigue breakages are almost universally the result of one or more of ...


4

The hub holes are elongated a little bit but I would not be concerned. It seems to me a pretty typical amount of deformation. I would reuse the hub but I would re-lace the hub with the same pattern. It's hard to say why the spokes failed but unless it happens repeatedly I would chalk it up to poor quality or defective spokes, or spokes that got unevenly ...


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