42

With a traditional non-through axle, there's a slot at the bottom of the fork (or the dropouts), the axle is hollow, and there is a skewer through axle. You use the quick-release to loosen the grip around that slot to slide the skewer (vertically) in and out of that slot, while it's still going through the wheel. With a through axle, there is simply a hole ...


14

A crack, unfortunately, is a crack. That’s dangerous no matter what the material. You could contact Allied to see if you have any options in terms of warranty. However, if you didn’t secure the bike properly, I would guess that they’d offer a discounted frame at most. You could find a carbon repair shop, e.g. Calfee and Ruckus Composites are two well known ...


10

It is of course in general OK to but rim brakes on your bike IF the frame supports them and IF the rim has the braking surface. You will need the right brake levers and cables. If your disc brakes were mechanical, they may or may not use the right actuation ratio - depends on the kind of rim brakes (road, V-brakes, cantis,...). But I do not think we can say ...


9

Thru Axles are a standard for wheel fasteners that was introduced fairly recently for MTB and later for road bikes. Today thru axles come typically in 15 mm or 12 mm diametres. If you mean thse, they are indeed always hollow. Any solid bolt with such a large diametre would be excessively heavy. Even when using light magnesium alloys. The whole innovation ...


8

This article does an excellent job of describing through-axles: http://cyclingtips.com/2015/10/road-bikes-are-headed-towards-through-axels-but-why/ Chiefly: They're inserted through the forks, not slotted into dropouts like Quick Release axles More symmetric forces are applied to the forks/suspension. Provides a solution against unwinding, pop-out QR ...


8

Yes it's dangerous. Contact Allied.


7

Simply for your two points: For a front wheel you can buy or machine a part that will allow you to run a smaller axle on the front than the hub is equipped with. This an adapter to run a 15mm TA hub in 9mm drop outs. The rear is more difficult as hub sizes get wider with larger diameter thru axles. You couldn't make a 12x142 thru axle hub fit in a 10x135 ...


7

It's a Maxle Stealth. They are a little cheaper and are also a weight savings thing. They're not super common but there's nothing wrong with them. They've also not been around very long, just less than two years as of now. As I understand it, on the Rockshox forks that Maxles are more typically found on, the Maxle Stealth versions are fully cross-compatible ...


7

This is really a personal preference. Usually people will grease the skewer threads and sometimes the skewer shaft as a way to help prevent seizing and corrosion. This can be especially useful if the skewer is made from cheap steel and/or the bike is frequently ridden or lives in wet conditions. Sometimes skewer shafts are chromed, in this case I wouldn't ...


7

Looking at the specs on Merida Website you have Fulchee through axles, FH1200 and FH1700. Looking at these on the Fulchee website (for the front FH1200 at least) I see that the lever for releasing the thru-axle is integrated and needs to be pulled out for use, termed a hidden lever design apparently. You'll see a slotted piece instead of a hex key fitting, ...


7

There are two ways, depending on the type of the hub. Most hubs use a separate axle around the thru-axle. So for example if you have a 15mm thru axle in the front, you would have a 18mm axle around the thru axle. The thru axle only tightens the other axle to the fork. Load is mainly carried by the other axle. Then the 18mm inner diameter bearing gets the ...


7

If the marking says 20 newton metres, then that's what the manufacturer has resolved as the correct torque. If you're looking for permission to undertighten your through-axle, then that's your personal decision. Instead, consider getting a single longer 6mm hex tool and stowing that with your spare tube on the bike. If weight is an issue, trim off ...


6

Unfortunately you have to use force to get those guys off. If you can wrap the cap with a rag and then grip it with a pair of pliers you should be able to pull it straight off. It will take some effort.


6

There are no thru axle FH-6800 or WH-6800 versions. The next/new Ultegra will have some, but as of now I don't think think any thru axle hubs or wheels that say Ultegra on them are really out in the wild at all. This bikes uses the SCS dropout/hub/axle system. Long story short, in the past couple years it was unclear what road thru axle standard was going ...


6

For regular opening like changing a tube or tyre do I open the little bolt or do I use the lever? You take the axel out by unscrewing with the lever (left loose). The bolt allows you to change the orientation of the lever relative to the axel, if you care about such things. What does the little screw with much smaller torque rating? The lever usually ...


6

You should screw your through axle according to the manufacturer's specified torque value range. The torque applied to the axle is not meant to be used for adjusting relative brake/disc position, even if you observe such effect. Keeping the axle under-torqued is dangerous, and over-torquing it might damage the fork/frame dropouts. A proper solution would be ...


6

Frame rear dropouts and forks for through-axles are of a substantially different design than those designed for quick-release hubs. Through axles are essentially a large bolt that attaches the wheel to the frame whereas quick releases (and older threaded axles clamp the hub into slots. Most frames and forks cannot be easily modified, the dropouts are ...


5

That's the thread pitch, i.e. the distance from the peak of one turn to the peak of the next. The best way to measure it without a gauge is to count 10 turns and measure how much length they take up, then divide by 10. For this sort of value you can measure the length of a single turn with callipers but that's a less reliable method. It looks like there ...


5

When getting the same 142x12 and 100x12 standard wheels I advise to take note of the following: If your frame requires special dishing or not. Synapse probably doesn't. Outer rim width. With wider rims, the rim clearance might become an issue. Not your case, though. Rotor fitting standard, 6 bolt or centerlock. Freehub body, 10-speed or 11-speed HG, ...


5

No - does your through-axle have shoulders to stop the bike being compressed from the side? If it did, then the axle wouldn't go into its hole. You're better off using a well-sized block of wood between the dropouts, and perhaps tying or taping it into place - mind out for tape adhesives on the paint/frame. Or put a stout box over the rear mech and ...


5

Because necessity is the mother of solving problems caused by poorly designed components, I'm answering my own question. I tried vice grips, as someone recommended, but the alloy in the axle was too soft to get any bite before they slipped off (did manage to mangle the exposed threads though, so that was fun to file off before removing it). The solution that ...


5

Yes, this is play in the bearings. How to fix it depends on the type of hub you have. 'Cup and cone' bearing hubs have ball bearings between fixed cups in the hub and adjustable cones on a threaded axle. These can be adjusted to take out play. Other hubs have pressed-in cartridge bearings. These just need to get replaced , you'll probably need a bike repair ...


4

It has a regular old quick release. The bike is way too low end to have a thru axle. You can see from pictures of the bike that it has dropouts in the fork and rear triangle, so the wheels are inserted in vertically. A thru axle does not have dropouts -- the axle has to go through the fork/frame. The wheel cannot be pulled vertically out from the frame.


4

The industry has gone through axle as they do have advantages. The dispute I have with the marketing is how much difference that advantage is. Through axles have advantages only if every thing else is equal. Like most things bikes, quality of construction is more important than style of gadget, so a QR on a quality hub will outperform a Though axle on a ...


4

MTBR has a pretty good write up about the technical aspect of it that can be seen HERE From that article come these two technical drawings. Boost 148 adds 3mm of spacing on each side of the hub. But unlike the 3.5mm difference from 135mm to 142mm, Boost 148 sees an increase in flange spacing, not just axle endcap width. Boost 110 uses a 15mm thru axle and ...


4

The specs of the thru-axle that you need are here. The one that you need is T1707, which is 12×142 with a thread of M12×1. The T1707 and the T1711 both fit a 142×12 mm with a thread of M12×1. The T1707 has an axle length of 162.5 mm, while the T1711 has an axle length of 175 mm. I couldn't find the TCR specs for this online, but since I ride a Giant Propel ...


4

You're unlikely to get hubs that convert from QR to thru-axle as part of a complete factory bike, though a good number of after market hubs are available which can be swapped between the different standards using end caps. I say unlikely but it's not impossible, the best thing would be to contact Scott directly or your local dealer with the enquiry. The ...


4

You can never replace a conical interface thru axle with a flat shouldered one. That's just the wrong part. Lack of contact area may cause the axle to loosen or the frame to become damaged. But what will probably be a more immediate problem is that most frames with a conical interface have a hole for the axle shaft that's a pretty loose fit, and often gappy ...


4

If there was no published information about this fork, we would first observe the potential replacement is longer but has the same threaded length. Therefore it is possible to construct a scenario where, say if the current axle fit exactly flush and the dropout had 9mm of threads, that you would need to use a washer to keep the new one from bottoming against ...


4

Most thru-axle front hubs have endcaps that pull straight off and are held in place with o-rings to gently create some friction. You can use the thru-axle to gently rock them back and forth to work them off if they're sticking. On yours, if you have the kind that pull off, poking something through those holes and pulling that way should also work. Some hubs ...


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