43

With a traditional non-through axle, there's a slot at the bottom of the fork (or the dropouts), the axle is hollow, and there is a skewer through axle. You use the quick-release to loosen the grip around that slot to slide the skewer (vertically) in and out of that slot, while it's still going through the wheel. With a through axle, there is simply a hole ...


9

Thru Axles are a standard for wheel fasteners that was introduced fairly recently for MTB and later for road bikes. Today thru axles come typically in 15 mm or 12 mm diametres. If you mean thse, they are indeed always hollow. Any solid bolt with such a large diametre would be excessively heavy. Even when using light magnesium alloys. The whole innovation ...


8

This article does an excellent job of describing through-axles: http://cyclingtips.com/2015/10/road-bikes-are-headed-towards-through-axels-but-why/ Chiefly: They're inserted through the forks, not slotted into dropouts like Quick Release axles More symmetric forces are applied to the forks/suspension. Provides a solution against unwinding, pop-out QR ...


7

It's a Maxle Stealth. They are a little cheaper and are also a weight savings thing. They're not super common but there's nothing wrong with them. They've also not been around very long, just less than two years as of now. As I understand it, on the Rockshox forks that Maxles are more typically found on, the Maxle Stealth versions are fully cross-compatible ...


7

This is really a personal preference. Usually people will grease the skewer threads and sometimes the skewer shaft as a way to help prevent seizing and corrosion. This can be especially useful if the skewer is made from cheap steel and/or the bike is frequently ridden or lives in wet conditions. Sometimes skewer shafts are chromed, in this case I wouldn't ...


6

Simply for your two points: For a front wheel you can buy or machine a part that will allow you to run a smaller axle on the front than the hub is equipped with. This an adapter to run a 15mm TA hub in 9mm drop outs. The rear is more difficult as hub sizes get wider with larger diameter thru axles. You couldn't make a 12x142 thru axle hub fit in a 10x135 ...


6

Unfortunately you have to use force to get those guys off. If you can wrap the cap with a rag and then grip it with a pair of pliers you should be able to pull it straight off. It will take some effort.


6

There are no thru axle FH-6800 or WH-6800 versions. The next/new Ultegra will have some, but as of now I don't think think any thru axle hubs or wheels that say Ultegra on them are really out in the wild at all. This bikes uses the SCS dropout/hub/axle system. Long story short, in the past couple years it was unclear what road thru axle standard was going ...


6

For regular opening like changing a tube or tyre do I open the little bolt or do I use the lever? You take the axel out by unscrewing with the lever (left loose). The bolt allows you to change the orientation of the lever relative to the axel, if you care about such things. What does the little screw with much smaller torque rating? The lever usually ...


6

You should screw your through axle according to the manufacturer's specified torque value range. The torque applied to the axle is not meant to be used for adjusting relative brake/disc position, even if you observe such effect. Keeping the axle under-torqued is dangerous, and over-torquing it might damage the fork/frame dropouts. A proper solution would be ...


5

That's the thread pitch, i.e. the distance from the peak of one turn to the peak of the next. The best way to measure it without a gauge is to count 10 turns and measure how much length they take up, then divide by 10. For this sort of value you can measure the length of a single turn with callipers but that's a less reliable method. It looks like there ...


5

When getting the same 142x12 and 100x12 standard wheels I advise to take note of the following: If your frame requires special dishing or not. Synapse probably doesn't. Outer rim width. With wider rims, the rim clearance might become an issue. Not your case, though. Rotor fitting standard, 6 bolt or centerlock. Freehub body, 10-speed or 11-speed HG, ...


5

Frame rear dropouts and forks for through-axles are of a substantially different design than those designed for quick-release hubs. Through axles are essentially a large bolt that attaches the wheel to the frame whereas quick releases (and older threaded axles clamp the hub into slots. Most frames and forks cannot be easily modified, the dropouts are ...


5

No - does your through-axle have shoulders to stop the bike being compressed from the side? If it did, then the axle wouldn't go into its hole. You're better off using a well-sized block of wood between the dropouts, and perhaps tying or taping it into place - mind out for tape adhesives on the paint/frame. Or put a stout box over the rear mech and ...


4

It has a regular old quick release. The bike is way too low end to have a thru axle. You can see from pictures of the bike that it has dropouts in the fork and rear triangle, so the wheels are inserted in vertically. A thru axle does not have dropouts -- the axle has to go through the fork/frame. The wheel cannot be pulled vertically out from the frame.


4

The industry has gone through axle as they do have advantages. The dispute I have with the marketing is how much difference that advantage is. Through axles have advantages only if every thing else is equal. Like most things bikes, quality of construction is more important than style of gadget, so a QR on a quality hub will outperform a Though axle on a ...


4

MTBR has a pretty good write up about the technical aspect of it that can be seen HERE From that article come these two technical drawings. Boost 148 adds 3mm of spacing on each side of the hub. But unlike the 3.5mm difference from 135mm to 142mm, Boost 148 sees an increase in flange spacing, not just axle endcap width. Boost 110 uses a 15mm thru ...


4

The specs of the thru-axle that you need are here. The one that you need is T1707, which is 12×142 with a thread of M12×1. The T1707 and the T1711 both fit a 142×12 mm with a thread of M12×1. The T1707 has an axle length of 162.5 mm, while the T1711 has an axle length of 175 mm. I couldn't find the TCR specs for this online, but since I ride a Giant Propel ...


4

You're unlikely to get hubs that convert from QR to thru-axle as part of a complete factory bike, though a good number of after market hubs are available which can be swapped between the different standards using end caps. I say unlikely but it's not impossible, the best thing would be to contact Scott directly or your local dealer with the enquiry. The ...


3

Are there any reasons not to build road bikes with through axels, even if they are not disc brake equipped? Is this a trend we might see as manufactures produce more pairs of very similar road disc/non-disc models? It makes very little sense to produce a rim brake bike with thu-axels. What wheel set would it run? Custom? Almost all thu-axel wheel sets on ...


3

Looks like Pinhead and others are selling through-axle kits. Do a web search on "anti-theft through axle."


3

Not possible. Convertible hubs are made to be that way, and no Shimano hubs are. There are no generic adapters or spacers that can do this. 756 XT far predates 15mm. There's no room for a 15mm axle in there.


3

Exact same thing happened with my Maxle Ultimate. Had to gently separate my rear fork to expose the axle and put a wrench between the gearset and frame to hold it open. I then drilled a small hole in the axle. Then incremented up bit sizes until I could fit an allen wrench in the hole and turn it.


3

I just bought a Norco fluid HT 2+ and thats got the same Maxle Stealth. I was a bit puzzled so rang the shop. It does need an Allen key so not a true no tools quick release which is a bit of a pain but other than that its lighter.......probably about the weight of the Allen key you have to carry !


3

Sounds weird and wrong. Usually you indeed have a lot more thread engagement, I think 5-6 turns or more on the road/cross forks I have my hands on all the time. If there are a lot of threads present on the fork and nothing filling them up, I agree it sounds unsafe. One easy possibility is that the bike ended up with an axle that isn't a correct match for ...


3

I don't think all Maxle's are the same, but I've had two different types and each could be tightened in a slightly different way. With one (I believe an older design) there is a 2.5mm hex bolt on the lever end which you can tighten/loosen to affect how tight the lever is. See an example of this here: http://www.bike-manual.com/brands/trek/om/assets/pdfs/...


3

Anyone have an idea as to whether this is fixable? It's not worth it. Quick release skewers are cheap. The medical costs you might incur if your "fixed" one were to fail while you're riding won't be - even if you have full medical coverage and no amount of medical care will cost you money, the non-monetary costs of any potential injury from a front wheel ...


3

I suspect a little that it was loose at one point and there won't be much movement of the brake within the thru-axle's window of "good" torque values. In other words, the range given for allen-headed "stealth" type thru axles, the only type that readily take a torque wrench, is usually about 9-13Nm, and I doubt there would be movement of the brake without ...


3

Most likely the manual writing team knew they had to specify a 'safe' QR position so the company would be covered legally. In consultations with the engineering and legal team they decided that in front of the fork leg was the safest position, or at least the position that a company lawyer could defend as the safest position in the case of a lawsuit.


3

Generally I'd put a QR lever at an angle close-to a frame tube but absolutely not touching the frame. The main purpose is to stop the QR lever being opened or loosened by any sort of foreign object. That may be another rider's wheel/tyre, a stick or road rubbish kicked up and catching wrong, or even a lucky catch on live foliage. One difference is that's ...


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