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2

A quick Google search turned up a thread at BikeForums that seems to have a consensus that 40mm is about the max size. Depending on the particular tire and how inflated it is, a 42mm tire might fit.


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https://www.sheldonbrown.com/tire-sizing.html Yes this link will give you and idea of the limits .


2

Greetings from the 60th parallel, where we ride studded tyres 5 months out of 12. What is the likelihood of the spikes puncturing the tubes? The first factor which this likelihood depends on is the tyre mark. My commuting friends have been telling stories about Schwalbe (Marathon or not) Winters doing that; I did not believe them until I got this: (...


2

I've had exactly this happen with the "winter" tyres you're looking at. I'm not light, and neither is the bike; a little of the distance was with a child on the back, so comparable to a heavy set of rear panniers Schwalbe say the only difference between their "winter" vs "marathon winter" is the extra studs on the marathons. The puncture protection is there ...


7

Studs pushing through the tire carcass might occur, but Increased load on the bike will not increase the probability of it happening The pressure of the tube against the tire or the tire against the road surface is determined by the air pressure the tires are inflated to, not the weight of the bike and rider. If the weight of bike and rider increases the ...


13

The current generation of pre-manufactured winter tires you'd get from brands like Schwalbe do not use 'screw-in' style studs that have a point on the inside surface. They have a pocket and flange design: I don't know of a source for actual data on this other than personal anecdote, so I can offer that. I have never had the stud on a commercially made/...


2

As someone who routinely rides that sort of distance, I'd say the biggest worry about punctures is knowing how to fix them, and being equipped (a couple of tubes, patch kit, pump, tyre levers). They're rare even on the poorly maintained back roads I often find myself on, and can happen whatever tyres you ride. Over the last two years, in 26 rides of over ...


0

I think it would work in tubeless tires, it's just not marketed for that. It's good stuff. I've used it for years in wheelbarrows, riding mowers and boat, travel and utility trailers. It always stopped the slow leaks.


2

Without seeing the exact tires that are on the bike, we need to speculate. Mattnz discusses how the width across the tire affects the chances of puncturing. Another factor is the thickness of the tire carcass, which might be what the shopkeeper meant. A thin-wall tire will obviously be more prone to punctures than a thick-wall tire, at any given tire width. ...


4

Excluding tires so old and worn they obviously need replacement, there are two main root causes of punctures in well maintained bicycles. Low Pressure causing 'snake bite' punctures. When the pressure is too low, and you hit a bump, the tire can pinch the tube against the rim and cause a puncture. Small tires have to run at higher pressure to stop this ...


1

Another gotcha is the fit of other parts around the tyre. Rim brake arms and calipers can change their profile throughout their stroke, and their stroke can change as the pads wear down. V brake arms are pulled in toward the side of a tyre as you brake. So a close fit here can mean interference once they close up. This would be exacerbated by worn down ...


4

The bead on a tire is a raised tubular section that goes around the inside edge of the tire on both sides. The diagram you have attached has no bead. It is a cutaway diagram of a rim/wheel, which does have bead seats (where the tire beads "lock into" the rim). The diagram is a bit confusing because it cuts out the center of the wheel (spokes and hub) to ...


6

The bead is the wire at the inner edge of the tire, which creates a bulge in the edge that locks into the groove in the rim. The word "bead" here is more akin to the woodworking term bead than to the "small ornaments on a string" sense.


1

How do the wheels attach? The instructions never illustrate how the wheels attach to the frame so all we can do is guess. Looking at the picture (the vehicle is facing left) The wheel bolts to the steering rack - attaching something like a wheelchair wheel. The there is a black verticle rod with a black ball on top on each side used to pivot the rack and ...


3

Yes those are the tyre diameter and width in inches. M12 is a kind of metric thread, 12mm in diameter and 8.8 is a strength rating. I guess the axle is a piece of M12 threaded rod.


4

I got myself studded tires when my commute had ≈150 m elevation difference which went through a narrow valley with a grade of 15 - 20 %. I'm in western/central Germany, so temperature stays around freezing point most of the winter: lots of frost cycles, meaning thawing during the day, water running on the road and freezing there in the night a period of ...


1

Narrow tyres require higher pressure as they have smaller contact area. Would guess you have something bad around - nipples, sharp edge, etc. I am running Schwalbe & Conti 23x622 for a few months now and have no problems to start @8.5 bars (limit on petrol stations) except they drop to 5-6 in few days - normal behaviour.


-2

I think the best option for your neds is Scwalbe Hurricane. Smooth, silent and quick on smooth surfaces and rough off road. But it is not always available (sold out?). Schwalbe Marathon is too smooth.


2

The 2005 Giant Cypress came with 700x38c tyres. https://www.bicyclebluebook.com/value-guide/product/92884/ Large volume tyres are growing in popularity over the last couple of years, so you should be able to find many good options in this size.


0

Looks like the model year 2002 came with 40mm tires, which will be a bit wider than 35s. Check out the Sawtooth tire by Specialized.


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