New answers tagged

1

How low, exactly? You're right, low pressure increases the size of the contact patch, which increases grip. If the pressure is so low that the tire is flat and the rim is riding on the ground, then this rule ceases to apply. But if that was the case, you would probably have noticed it earlier. The cause was probably either the change in incline, or the ...


0

The first number refers to the tire width: 62mm versus 54mm for the tires you're looking at. Will this tire fit? Probably but... The tire will fit on the rim but the question is whether the larger tire will fit in the bicycle safely. Manufacturers are infamous in misstating tire widths so your current tires may be less than 54mm (2") and the 62mm tires ...


0

I know it's not a permanent solution, but you can actually use bacon strips, then put more sealant inside the tire. It works better this way because the bacon strips absorb the sealant. BTW bacon straps are a mountain bikers thing, but i've seen them work on road bike before too. I hope this helps!!


4

It means height variation, and it is a non-idiomatic translation. Edit: As pointed out in comments, the translation is from "Höhenschlag", where "höhe" means height and "schlag" translates to blow, slap or stroke. It means specifically bicycle tire or rim that is out of round vertically. Lateral out of round is Seitenschlag. My original guess: There are ...


0

Never heard it before sorry. To guess, I'd say it would be the outer rolling edge of the tyre (when installed correctly and inflated) that has "runout". You know how a tyre sits poorly when some part of the bead isn't clicked into the bead-seat on the rim? Well, imagine that but caused by variances in the construction of the tyre, so that the two opposite ...


3

Searched and found nothing. It seems that even within the Bicycle Rolling Resistance site that is the only article that uses that term. With only the context of the article to guide - my best guess is that "height stroke" is another way of saying out of round. Poorly made tires may have a high spot even when correctly installed/seated that can be noticed ...


1

Sealants work best in a tubeless setup. I've had mixed results when used in tubes. Also note that many (all?) sealants have a limited shelf life. I use Orange Seal and they recommend replacing at 1 year (yes just one year). I work in a shop and regularly see bikes where the tire is flat and the sealant is clearly years old and does nothing but add weight. ...


0

you could consider using strips of Kevlar for puncture protection. It's also used in anti-stab vests (which protect the wearer from knife attacks and such), that being said you will need a few layers to get the desired protection. IIRC you need approx 28 layers to make it bulletproof (Uzi, 9mm etc.) :) You could tape the ...


3

I have used "Slime" which is another option. You put it inside the tube and it will seal any punctures including any existing ones. I was getting multiple punctures each week due to a mile long thorn bush that was cut along my route. I probably have lots of thorns in my tyre now but it's still inflated fine.


7

This sounds like one of those ridiculous old-time ideas that sound good but noone does in reality, like backpedalling on a descent. Assuming you put the old tyre inside your new tyre, they're doing to be about the same size so the old tyre's bead will poke out. There will be no gain in the old tyre seating on the rim, you need the outer new tyre to seat ...


11

I'd just buy tyre liners (example from Zefal). They're made from tough polyurethane which many sharp things won't get through or at least not quickly. I've used cheap (unbranded eBay) ones on a cheap bike when I didn't want to buy expensive new tyres, and they worked well, with one issue, probably what your mechanic was thinking of that was easily solved by ...


5

A Slightly different approach, Get an old tube, cut it open, then wrap it around your existing tube. put the whole lot inside your tire and fit as usual. you can add more than 1 tube with no issue, I've done this in the past for unparalleled puncture resistance!


2

Install the tire and pump up to pressure and see if there is any bulging which would indicate the chords are damaged. Damaged tires belong in the trash. If there is no sign of chord damage and you decide to use the tire, I would strongly suggest 2 or 3 layers of duct tape or similar as a patch on the inside. Not only will this provide additional strength ...


1

I'd say you could keep using it as long as the hole isn't all the way through. Make sure the piece of glass or whatever caused the cut is removed from the tire so it doesn't cause a flat next time you ride the bike. I've worn out many tires and at the end of their life (when they're worn so far I have to replace them) they usually have cuts that look like ...


12

Pull the valve core and poke a 2mm Allen wrench down to test the fluid level with the valve at the 6 o'clock position with the tire off the ground. You want "some" free liquid. How much depends on the tire size but I usually look for at least 3mm. Some amount of sealant from a new installation goes to coating the tire and in many cases filling in the ...


6

Depends on your confidence levels - if you're going for a 3 hour tour then its a very long walk home. For a 5 minute roll to the local shops, a walk would merely be annoying. Topping up sealant is normal, and should be done every ~6 months anyway. As long as you have the same stuff, I'd consider it. First try to ascertain how much is left in the tyre, ...


2

If the cut is through the threads under the tread, so you can see the split on the inside of the tire, then as people have noted, you can try something like a patch on the inside but the effectiveness of this drops pretty quickly as the size of the cut through the threads gets larger. Note that typically tube patches are pressed against the inside of the ...


2

You can sew the cut together using a needle and a thread. Unless you are using a tubeless setup, you do not even need to patch/seal it afterwards. If you do need to seal it, you can place a patch over the stitches. There are tutorials available on the internet. Even in the form of videos The thread to be used should be of high quality for better durability. ...


3

Rolling resistance of MTB tyres is not necessarily related to either width or tread pattern. The quality of the casing and rubber compound have far more influence. A high quality 3.0" tyre will be faster, grippier and more pleasant to ride than a cheap 2.1" tyre. Changing to a much smaller tyre will also change some characteristics of the bike for the ...


7

It mostly depends on the width of your rims. If, for example, your rims are 50 mm wide (internal bead distance), then 2.1" tires (nominally 53 mm wide) would sit very awkwardly on them. Instability at cornering and overall tire stability are likely to be problems. There are answers on this website about best tire width/rim width combinations, look them up if ...


2

It is correct (as stated in the other answers, which I've voted up) that tyre sizing systems mean the actual stated sizes can't be converted, and in fact the width of a given tyre will vary depending on the rim width. That said, ETRTO 622-23 tyres are sometimes sold as 28x0.9" (random web example). This link is priced in €, which isn't surprising - it's ...


5

To answer the question as written, 23 is the width of the tire in millimeters when mounted and inflated. The actual width depends on the rim width, and manufacturers typically don't tell which rim width the announced width is measured with. Diameter is more complicated. 700mm is the outer diameter of "C" type tire when mounted and inflated. This gives rim ...


7

You're asking a question that cannot be answered. Sorry - the plethora of tyre size measuring systems means there is no good answer. Diameter could be 29 inches, it could be 28 inches, it could even be 27 inches. But the bead seat IS 622 millimetres without exception. The width likewise varies - there are fractional inch measurements that do not line up ...


6

WRT the photo - I'd be quite confident you can fit a 25mm in there without issue. A 28mm looks like it would probably fit acceptably, but I doubt a 32 mm would fit. The best solution here is to take your bike to a Local Bike Shop, and buy your 28mm tyre/tube from there, on the provisio if it doesn't fit on either end you simply swap it for a 25mm. Second ...


5

How much space do I need between my tire and brakes to change from 700x23 to 700x25 or 700x28 tires? My understanding of the question is that you have 3mm between the top of the tire and the bottom of the brake using a 700x23 tire. In the situation under question when going to a wider tire you need to worry about brake and frame / fork clearance. In a ...


2

Your brake pads should not be touching your tires. If they are touching, you need to reposition the pads immediately so that they contact the rim sidewalls. The only time this should be a concern is when you are installing or removing a wheel (when fixing a flat, for example). Brakes normally have a release that opens up the brake arms to accommodate the ...


2

For bicycles the so called "snow tires" are essentially mountain bike tires with large gaps between the lugs so snow will come out. Studded tires are intended for ice and do little good in loose snow. I have a snow bike (aka fat bike) with knobby tires designed for snow - but no studs. I have another bike with Schwalbe Marathon 26"x2.2" studded tires and ...


1

A few weeks ago I rode into the parking garage of my apartment building. I had just come off wet streets and my tires (25mm near-slicks) were still wet. The concrete of the parking garage is quite smooth–nearly polished (why??)–and even though I was going but a couple of MPH, as I made a leisurely left turn, I went down. That sort of wipe-out cannot be ...


2

You don't reveal where on the planet you are looking Bernard! For example in Australia the main bicycle wholesalers have both 20x3 and 20x4 readily available. I'd imagine if you are in Europe or North America it would be similar, so you just need to ask your lbs to order it in for you. It's unlikely to be a stocked item as it's a slow mover. A motorbike ...


1

yes I'm pretty sure it should work. have not tried it myself but when you pump up a tube outside of the tire the diameter increases quite a lot (so the change in diameter from 26-27.5 or from 27.5-29") should not be an issue imo.


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