New answers tagged

5

There's no issue with running a 28 on this width rim. In the decades of 23mm tires being the norm and virtually all road rims being 13-15mm internal width, many cyclists rode 28s since it's the widest size many such road bikes can take. 32 is also fine. 35 is about where issues with squirmy feel are perceptible.


3

I think it might be one of those skills you can't fully demonstrate in a video. You've got some great answers already from the usual suspects, but I think another aspect is that it's much about the feel of it under your fingers, and where exactly your hands go to get the leverage on that particular combination of tyre and rim. I struggled myself until I got ...


17

That video is of a relatively supple tire going on easy. It's pretty blasé about the difficulties that can be encountered. He does end at the valve, which is good because advice to do the contrary is one of the most parroted falsehoods in cycling, but he doesn't talk about why. There is a universal truth of difficult clincher tire mounting situations, and ...


7

One technique is to use the "well" or valley in the rim. The tyre wants to sit in the bead, so you have to actively squeeze the tyre bead together and make it sit in the lowest part of the rim. This gives you slack which can be used at the other side to get the tyre over the rim. Check out How can I fit Schwalbe Marathon Plus 28-622 tires on a 622-16 rim? ...


4

First of all, some tires are much easier to mount than others. It just depends on how "tight" they are. Secondly, some people have much stronger hands and fingers than I do. I've seen others take a tire that I've been unable to mount and simply "roll" it onto the rim. My take is if you need a lever, use it rather than kill yourself trying to get it on ...


-4

Of course not. Why are you risking your life on the word of a bunch of internet strangers you're never going to meet or be able to hold accountable? Go to a qualified specialist and have the suspect tyre examined… Whatever else, please remember that if it does fail and any kind of law-enforcement finds out you Posted this query, you will have no weakest ...


14

I would not ride that tyre. Pretty sure I can see tube in the second photo, and that's asking for a sudden blowout. You might choose to put a boot/patch on the inside of the tyre, and use this as an indoor trainer tyre only. Might be okay on rollers, would make a great front-wheel tyre for a direct-drive trainer (ie, the wheel that doesn't turn at all.) ...


5

The rim size is immaterial to the strength of the set you choose. Many rim brake 650b rims out there would not make good tandem rims, but there are exceptions. The VO Voyager or Diagonale in 36h are the main ones I can think of. Sun CR-18s are another, cheaper possibility. Also Velocity Cliffhanger or Atlas. 650b is likely the right choice for a ...


1

In addition to Criggie's suggestion, if the hole in your tube from your last flat is facing the tire, when you get your next flat; remove the tire/tube together from the wheel, put a mark on the tube and tire with a ink marker to record the position of the tube in the tire. When you find the hole in the tube, you will be able to correlate it to a spot on the ...


1

I once accidentally exploded an inner tube in a 26" x 1-1/4" tire using the compressor at an automobile repair shop. It exploded close to my head, because I was holding the hose to the tire valve stem. Wow, what a loud bang it made! If you decide to use the compressor at your mechanic's garage, be very careful. I've never heard of a pump that wouldn't ...


1

Are you sure you are not just underestimating the pressure the tyres need? You can of course use an air compressor if you have one in your garage. I do that myself both with an MTB bike and with a road bike. Just be sure to have the correct pressure there because it could be easy to over-inflate the tyre. Just pump your compressor to the pressure you need ...


2

Looks like an error to me - its either 29" or 27.5" with no ambiguity. It is unusual to see details embedded in the tread, I've never seen it in person. You could choose to highlight the correct size details with a white paint pen, and/or file the wrong marking off with some careful strokes of a file. Or ride till it wears off :)


9

No, that person was confused and you have it right. A new 700x25 tire will fit the same as what you have. Often 40 year old wheels will need new rim strips while you're at it.


1

ANSWER: yes smaller tubes can fill larger tyres, but they may fail quickly and unexpectedly. I had this exact same situation. I am converting a road bike to urban, and the largest size tire I could fit was a 700x28, the road bike has 700x23. When I got the old tires off and pulled the tube it was sized 700x23-25. I had changed the tires and reused the old ...


2

I had this same question so I did some looking around. Here's what I picked up -- The simple formula for figuring out which tire works for you. Take the amount of contact area of the tire on the ground and multiply by PSI you have in your tire. So, the "area" (width times length) of the tire along the ground, multiplied by the psi. So, 2" of tire down ...


0

If it's any consolation; my road and gravel bike share the same wheelsets. All four sets are set up tubeless, have an inner width of 24mm, and I have mounted many dozens of tires on them. Sizes ranging from 700 x 23 up to 29 x 1.8" and everything in-between. No burps, no blown out beads, no problems other than changing out sealant, and re-taping the rim beds ...


0

I recommend tracking down the rim manufacturer's recommendations. Standards for road tubeless are still not completely settled, and manufacturer don't even agree on what makes for a safe setup. Tolerances are tighter than with tubed setups, and as this case suggests, putting on a tire that is a fraction of a millimeter too wide may result in a blowoff, which ...


1

As others have said, the biggest risk comes from sidewall failures. Even with the tread worn out there's usually enough (reinforced) rubber to prevent splitting on the tread, but the sidewalls are weaker. I would say the worst case is for it to blow out while cornering hard. You're likely to lose grip and not get it back again, so slide out and hit the ...


2

Worst case from a worn tyre would be it splitting, and popping off the rim causing the wheel to lock up, and you to probably fall off, or at least damage the wheel. I managed to get an innertube pinched between the front rim and the tyre on a racing bike, got a few hundred metres down the road and it popped with enough force to completely blow the tyre off ...


3

If it’s just the rubber tread which is worn down and thinner: Keep using it. With treadless tires you’ll only suffer from increased susceptibility to punctures. Of course with knobby/treaded tires your grip on soft surfaces will gradually decrease. If the tire’s structural integrity could be compromised: Don’t use it. It could fail catastrophically at any ...


0

Generally road tubeless is road tubeless and going to the 25 should be fine.


1

I don't think the tread blocks are 'hollow' exactly. Tires are made up of layers of different formulas of rubber. I think you have worn though the outer layer and a little chip of rubber has flaked out of the center of some of the the blocks. Now you can see that the next layer down has de-laminated from the outer a little, so it looks like there is a void ...


1

2.125 is about a 54. That's enough mismatch that over long term use you could see the thing where the surface of the tube picks up a crinkled texture and it could maybe split and fail under pressure, especially if you're running high pressure, I.e. 55+ PSI. For this reason it's not really optimal, but it's a long term issue (probably years) if anything ever ...


1

I suspect that the hub bearings are wonky and are causing the axle to twist. This will tend to unscrew the right side fixing bolt.


0

Yes, the washers must be different. Your bike is equipped with the Shimano Nexus hub. You can find information about the washers here: https://sheldonbrown.com/nexus-mech.html#washers The part that is shearing into the frame should actually be in the front, inside the slot, not on the frame. Actually, they are both facing wrongly the front-rear.


23

It’s an intentional wear indicator. There should be “TWI” (Tread Wear Indicator) and a small arrow printed on the sidewall where the dimple is. When the dimple is no longer visible your tread is almost gone and it’s about time to replace the tire.


0

Sheldon Brown had a great article on his site about various tire characteristics, including some of the science behind them. Reading that will help you be better informed when purchasing new rubber. Your rear tire doesn't look like it needs to be replaced, in my opinion. It probably has at least 20% of it's life left before you "should" replace it. But, if ...


30

It is an increasingly common practice for manufacturers to add tire wear indicators, which are little divots like the ones on your tire. Otherwise, there is no objective measure of when to change a tire apart from your mileage log (and riders of different weights should be expected to wear out tires at different rates). Basically, once you can no longer see ...


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