16

If you look at titanium frame bikes on the web you can see their warranties. Most have very long or life time warranties that cover everything but crashes and deliberate damage to the frame. So I would assume this frame was involved in a crash. There are three types or cracks in titanium frames (from best to worst): Weld crack seam crack (titanium comes in ...


14

Despite what others have said, a warranty is a bona fide contract between the company and you. It's used in the selling of the product thus is covered by decent consumer protection law (in the UK anyway). This article from Which suggests a good process to follow. Keep a record of the contact with the company, try to follow their warranty procedure. If you'...


12

To identify a frame firstly see if a magnet sticks, if it does it's steel, if not it's carbon, aluminium alloy or titanium alloy. If not steel look down the seat tube if it's metallic inside it could be aliminium or titanium if black and plastic looking, carbon. Tap the frame with a screw driver, aluminium and titanium will have a definite metallic 'tink' ...


8

As you're in the UK, the Consumer Rights Act applies. It would seem that a £5,500 bike that lasts less than two years isn't of "satisfactory quality", but I would be surprised if the shop simply gave you a refund. I think you have to give them at least one attempt at repairing the frame (I don't know how feasible that is for titanium), and take it from there....


8

As a cyclist who had a hard time getting comfortable on road geometry with drop handlebars, I will recommend that you ride as many different bikes as possible for a long time before you consider dropping money on a "custom" bike. Considering frame material and construction, geometry quirks, wheel sizes, brake types, drivetrain compatibility, tire clearance, ...


7

Aside from weight, there is no real benefit. Titanium is an alloyed steel, and has no limitation on weight or riding style, generally, although there are likely ultra light versions which do have limits.


6

Am I looking at the right thing? The little line running across the seat tube about 1cm above the bottom bracket? It's hard to say, but personally I'm not sure that's a crack at all. It looks more like a scratch. I say that because: a) it looks shallow, and b) that is a really, really weird place for a crack to occur. There are four types of stress (...


6

Presumably you're talking about a Profile or one of the other BMX hubs with ti hop-up bolts available. Yes, there is no issue. Were a bolt loose and able to rub dynamically against the frame, they could in theory chew it up because they'll probably be way harder. But if you're riding around with loose axle bolts you'll have other much more imminent problems.


5

I'm way late to this party, but in case anyone else wanders in, I'll say - based on countless postings of similar Ti-frame problems - that this and similar joined areas are common locations to have a crack on a titanium frame. Gary E (above) already talked about the need to have an inert gas atmosphere when welding titanium or you will find that the titanium ...


5

I'd highly recommend two courses of action. First, take a couple deep breaths and then call back the manufacturer. Without too many details to cloud the issue, and without too much emotion, explain that you believe you have a frame crack that in your estimation is from a defective weld. Play nice, if they still refuse to warranty it, ask what they can/...


5

I usually plug the hole with appropriate size hardware. I add a dab of anti-seize compound. My reasoning (other than appearance) is that while the frame is aluminum or carbon the threaded insert is typically steel and there fore subject to rust.


5

Carbon seatposts likely produce the most vibration damping There have been at least two lab tests of vibration damping in seatposts. One, by Bike Radar, tested five brands of carbon seatposts. The second, by Velonews, tested 14 seatposts, including carbon, aluminum, and titanium. In addition, the Velonews test included one traditional suspension seatpost (i....


4

Custom frames are better, but for many people there is enough adjustability in standard components to get a good fit. If you can, find a fitter who is also a physical therapist. Getting comfortable on a bike for longer distances is often a matter of fitting the bike to you and fitting you to the bike.


4

For titanium frames, it is best to use a copper paste grease. You need to do so anywhere there is metal on metal contact, especially if it is aluminum to titanium contact. Normal grease is not enough to prevent the accelerated oxidation and bonding that occurs between totanium and other metals.


4

Its not just the material that affects frame longevity, but the design of frames - different tubing thicknesses and geometries will last longer than others given the same materials. That being said, a lot of touring bikes (often made of steel such as Reynolds 521 or the Tange equivalent or something, since in a pinch, you can repair steel in pretty much ...


4

Getting it fixed may cost more than the frame is worth and there's no guarantee it won't crack again. My husband's titanium Litespeed road frame cracked on the head tube twice. The first time, Litespeed replaced the frame. The second time (cracked in almost the same spot as the first one) Litespeed said the frame had exceeded the "lifetime" of the lifetime ...


4

There is a plethora of alloy and carbon bikes which contradict a lot of the above. Certainly with early alloy framed bikes a lot of what has been written above was true - fat tubes, straight gauge, non-profiled. This is where alloy got its harsh ride reputation from. And cheap alloy frames probably still bear this unfortunate hallmark and reputation. If you ...


3

Generally speaking you shouldn't need either. The tolerances for press fit parts are made to do just that Press Fit! I have seen some mechanics use grease when pressing the headset but that is more so for ease of installation. It takes a lot more pressure to get it out than it does in. Being that you may need to change them at some point I would stay away ...


3

Actually, there are usually quite easy ways to tell steel from aluminum. As one poster already mentioned, if it's pretty heavy, we can rule out titanium. This leaves us between steel and aluminum. Generally, an aluminum bike will have larger tube diameters due to the properties of the material. On most steel bikes that I've seen, the seat tube is 28.6mm in ...


3

From what it sounds like is that you've been trying to do sportive 'road' riding on a hybrid bike which has a geometry that doesn't fit your riding style well. It may feel fine for more casual riding, but not for your more sporty style. You need bikes that works for the types of riding which you prefer to do. Many places can do a pre-purchase bike ...


3

Titanium alloys are typically made of Aluminum and Vanadium: e.g. on a 3AL/2.5V Ti bike Frames for instance there is 3% Aluminum, 2.5% Vanadium and the rest is Titanium. Main benefits of Titanium is no corrosion, immense resistance to fatigue (material failure due to cyclic constraints), and weight indirectly (i.e. stronger material allows to use thinner ...


3

such dents happen from rocks flying off your front wheel and hitting the frame.The dent doesn't seem big enough to be dangerous as long, as you don't do some hard-core mountain biking, just make sure to check it from time to time, if dent gets bigger you should replace the frame.


2

For skewers, weight. That's it. Ti skewers will make your bike and your wallet lighter.


2

The rear wheel (with a Ti skewer) on one of my road bikes would flex and rub against the frame when I stomped on the pedals or climbed a steep hill no matter how tight I made the skewer. I fixed the problem by switching to a steel skewer. No more flex and even the rear derailleur shifts better.


2

You could add two 2.5mm spacers on each side, or even on the same side (or one 5mm spacer). If you add to one side, you could even correct some perceived/subjective asymmetry, be it with chainline or with wheel dishing. It's not impossible, if you use the wheel without spacers, that the dropouts get marked by the axle nuts, due to the slight twisting that ...


2

I have broken a Ti stem that held my handlbars. Ti seat rail Ti frame (in 3 places now, alas) So Ti is not magical, but this is on a 18 year old frame now, so not that surprising. I have broken several axles, but steel ones have been sufficient for the last few years for me. I suspect weight is the only benefit, however when you care at the level of ...


2

If you are not worried about cosmetics, these dents won't affect the frame at all. I had a massive dent on top tube of my Ti trials bike from bad crash. And rode the bike for years after that. And nothing happened to the frame. Titanium is very good in for this. Dents won't affect the overall lifespan.


2

You could try epoxy as a start (I usually use EpoFix). Remember to: - sand and roughen the contact surface - clean the surface by alcohol to dissolve any grease/oil - mix epoxy and glue the two parts together. - note that if it is your first time mixing epoxy, you might want to practice before making any kind of permanent structure. This epoxy adhesion is ...


2

There are many companies today producing "lugged" frames out of aluminum/steel/titanium with carbon fiber tubes. Seven Cycles is one example, but there are others. Additionally, some people are independently making carbon frames with lugs that have been created using 3D printer madness. Reading various forums and the last link, 3M, Loctite and West System ...


2

I would say yes, use copper grease / ti prep / anti-seize on any titanium-to-metal contact (and especially ti to aluminum) that you anticipate staying put for a long period of time. Length of the seatpost - yes Seat post clamp - yes Bottle cages bolts - yes Rear derailleur - yes The front derailleur clamp seems more questionable because it isn't threaded ...


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