25

Terminology is important here. Pedal Clips (refer here) are straps that tighten around the shoe. Clipless, such as SPD have a cleat - refer here Toe clips are not common these days - but still used by some (touring and fixed hub bikes) more niche applications. I assume you are talking about SPD style clipless pedals, but the following discussion does not ...


21

Clipless pedals hold your feet more securely and release easier than toe-straps and clips. As you are probably aware, it is possible to to tighten straps to the point where they must be released before the foot can be removed from the pedal. A properly functioning clipless pedal will always release the riders foot.


19

First let's clarify the difference between "clipless" and "clip" pedals. They are confusing terms as both have clips. Clip pedals (which I prefer to call cages) look like this: Cages have the advantage that they can be used with normal shoes. To get your foot into them you push it in from the rear and (optionally) reach down and tighten the strap. In my ...


16

The simple answer is that 'clipless' pedals and shoes just function better than toe straps. They are easier to get into, easier to get out of, locate the foot more accurately and solidly on the pedal, and allow for better transfer of power all the way around the pedal stroke. The position of the foot on the pedal can also be precisely adjusted, as can the ...


8

You ask about danger, when/where to use, and when/where not to use, so...: There's the danger that you forget to unclip when you stop, and fall to your side. This is a real danger, but not a serious one except if your fitness is a bit low (risk of wrist, shoulder, hip or ankle lesion). You should then practice a lot first, both clip and unclip while riding ...


7

I have been using biking shoes with SPD cleats for nearly 20 years, and I definitely fell and got banged up as a new user of clipless pedals. I have since learned how to get in and out of them to the point where it is second nature and I hardly think about it at stoplights, etc. I find them especially valuable for damp conditions, when regular shoes would ...


6

The main disadvantage to either toe clips or (even moreso) clipless pedals is that until you get used to them you're likely to have a few rather inelegant falls (like pulling up to a stoplight and just falling over). There are other cases where they can contribute to falls (or exacerbate falls that would have occurred anyway), particularly in off-road ...


5

You'll most likely have a few light tumbles. Also, you can get "beginners cleats" for Shimano pedals. The proper name is Multi Directional Cleats and the model number is SM-SH56. These will let go if you pull really hard in any direction. I used them for around 4 months when I first went clipless. Saved me some skinned knees. After switching to Crank ...


5

There is some disagreement within the cycling community about how beneficial clipless pedals and toe clips are over regular platform pedals. I won't get into the argument here, but feel free to read the above link for the best thought-out argument against clipless pedals. However, the most commonly named advantage of clipless pedals and toe clips is the ...


5

There are extra risks associated with being physically attached to the pedals, however the risks are probably quite small. I found the following articles on Pubmed: Two cases of acetabular fractures sustained during competitive cycling cyclists who are attached to their pedals by straps or clips are likely to tumble with their bicycle and fall ...


5

I believe the first question you should ask yourself is this: Is some marginal perceived effiency gain worth the added risk of injury that clipless pedals provide? EVERYONE (including most of the posters in this thread, and surely any comments to this post as well) will give you dogma about how clipless pedals are better, more efficient and the defining ...


4

Doing it like the first picture shows is definitely not a good idea. The strap should be the other way round with the buckle as close as possible to the pedal's body. Reason 1: it can be tightened by pulling the end up and released with a the flick of the thumb on the buckle. (The reason for this black plastic end of the buckle) Reason 2: The end of the ...


4

They are more efficient. Firstly you need to do less work to keep your feet on the pedals. Though it seems like that might be trivial you do expend energy and or concentration on keeping you feet on the pedals this will reduce that somewhat. Additionally in some circumstances it is safer, your feet will not slip off the pedals when you go over a bump. ...


4

For me, a big benefit of cycling with "clipless" pedals is that when I "clip in" to my "clipless" pedals my foot is instantly firmly attached at my ideal pre-set position-- fore/aft, inboard/outboard, toe in/toe out. When using "clips and straps" I am endlessly wiggling my foot to try to find the best position. All this is adjustable by adjusting the ...


3

Your lock ring is loose. Normally the cog is quite tight from pedaling and you can do some braking with it. When you brake harder it breaks loose and unscrews until it hits the lock ring. This is what you feel as sliding. The lock ring has left hand thread to keep the cog from unscrewing completely. Now that the cog has tightened against lock ring, the ...


3

First off: Thanks to everyone who clarified what clipless, clip-in, platform pedals are. Arguments for using Clipless pedals (in order of importances to me): Knee Pain: When I was riding with platforms I used pedals that had large metal spikes protruding from them to improve grip. This caused my kness major issues because they could not pivot or float ...


2

There are plenty of strapless clips on Wiggle which come in extra-large. An example is this https://www.wiggle.co.uk/mks-steel-toe-clips/ Top Features: 3 sizes Medium Euro 36-40 Large Euro 40-44 X-Large Euro 44-48 44-48 Euro is size 12-15 US, 11-14.5 UK


2

Despite @ump's combative tone, he does back up what he's saying with links to evidence. GCN has also done one or two episodes that mostly debunk the benefits of being locked into your pedals. As far as I can tell, all the tests that attempt to prove or disprove the benefits of clipless pedals have been done on a treadmill in a lab; it may be that the ...


2

Apart from being safer from the clip and toe-strap pedals, the wide use of "clipless" pedals has come from marketing and fashion. You need to buy clipless shoes to be used with clipless pedals; you will not be able to wear casual shoes for the clipless pedals. The clip and strap assemblies are still available and these are to be fixed onto normal flat ...


2

It's surprising that this is as hot a topic as it is. Clipless pedals are more efficient, and you can get stiffer shoes for them. Competitor or not, if you step foot into clipless pedals I think you will notice the difference. Go take a pair for a test ride and you will probably favor the increased control, especially if you ride longer distances. Perhaps ...


1

MKS, while alloy, makes smaller toe clips. I personally have a set of their small toe clips as I wanted to reduce toe overlap. http://www.mkspedal.com/English/MKS_padal_news.htm Most places that distribute MKS toe clips can order you the XS or Small size.


1

IMO the advantages of clipless pedals outweight the drawbacks, for example : no pedal hits in the tibia (ouch) no crash because the foot slips off the pedal much better control of the bike (easier to bunny hop curbs, etc) However the type of pedals is very important. I hate SPDs. Cranks are the best but the axles and bearings break. TIME is a good ...


1

In my mind/opinion, flats, cages and cleats (using terminology that should have been invented years ago...) have distinctly different purposes, and their strengths for each application should not necessarily be crossed over to other uses. Let's start with flat pedals. Flats come either with or without pins. (Here's on with pins. http://fcdn.mtbr.com/...


1

Just picked up this from a casual search on return from a nightmare holiday in France. I am a lifelong cyclist who used to ride with toeclips, straps AND shoeplates (when the old Queen was on the throne). Try getting your feet out of that combo in a hurry, you are on the bike for good! Anyway I picked up on clipless (Shimano SPD) fairly quickly and until ...


1

To ride a bike efficiently the ball of your foot must be over the pedal spindle and to answer your question, toe clips and straps are one way of doing this. Up to the mid-80s that was the method used by all serious cyclists. You could buy small, medium and large toe clips for any size of shoe to fix your feet in the correct position. Metal or leather shoe ...


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