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32

I use a tool made out of a steel wire clotheshanger to squeeze the two pins together and open the link. Also, that one hanger turned into three tools: the link opener, a tool to hold the ends of an open chain together, and one to hang the cleaned-and-drying chain from the tree over the driveway.


30

When disconnected, a chain master link looks like this: Opening this style requires pressure between the two pins, parallel to the length of the chain. The proper tool is a special pair of pliers like this: And in use look like this:


23

You do this with a tool called torque (sometimes called dynamometric) wrench. Without a tool you can estimate it this way: Make yourself familiar with a weight of 1 kg Apply the force with your simple wrench 10 cm from the bolt in question This will give you 1 Nm of force. To get 5 Nm, use 5 kgs of weight or increase length to 50 cm. The math is simple: ...


20

Minimally, you want to be able to tighten all of the bolts on your bike (likely a few hex keys will do this) and an appropriate screwdriver for adjusting derailer & brake pulls. Separate from a multi-tool, a pair of tire levers are the other tool you should carry with you. I would add a chain tool to the above list after being left in a state where I ...


17

This is what I tell everyone to get first when they get a new bike: Seatbag, to hold the following: Spare tube (maybe two) Small multitool Mini-pump or CO2 inflator Tire patch kit 2x tire levers That assumes you have bidons and cages. Those six things should get you by for many miles and should get you out of any trailside emergencies. As with ...


17

If the nuts are rounded they're stuffed. You want to remove the nuts but not damage other things, like axles. I'll assume you're talking about axle nuts, but the same ideas apply to all nuts, bolts, and even screws to some extent. So your nuts look something like this: Clean the flats up with a file. Use a medium flat file and smooth off the lumps of ...


17

That's a spoke wrench, for turning spoke nipples. The benefit of this design is that, as opposed to the kind with an arm coming out each side of a central body, the force from your fingers is spread over the faces of the disk, meaning you can apply more force and it hurts less. I'm not certain, because I haven't used it, but it also seems like it would ...


16

It is possible to open the link without the "special tool" that Criggie's answer uses. The trick is to get the chain loose/slack so you can fold it back on itself such that the master link is at right angles to the two adjacent links. Then you use a regular pair of pliers, held at an odd angle (helps to contort your mouth as you do this), to apply pressure ...


16

Looking at manufacturers site I found repair kit with 'mysterious' blue mesh listed as "Cartridge freeze protector". It is supposed to be put over the cartridge (like in this picture) to prevent skin irritation/burn because CO2 gets very cold when discharged.


16

Use the correct tool. There really is no other good answer. Bodges that could get the old one off, maybe a hammer and cold chisel - likely to upset the threads on the freehub. a grinder and cutoff disk - guaranteed to damage the freehub, plus throws sparks and metal shavings into the mechanism. I've actually done this to a cheap bike where all I needed ...


14

For use at home, there's no question that separate keys are more useful and more economical. A multi-tool has limitations that make it cumbersome to use in tight spots because all the keys are attached to the tool. Separate keys suffer no such limitation. Separate keys can be bought and replaced individually and very inexpensively -- not so with a multi-...


14

You really will struggle to complete this task without the proper tools, I can't actually imagine how you would do it successfully. Criggie's answer helpfully details some good ways to go about borrowing the tools. However... As people have suggested in the comments, if you are changing to an 11-speed cassette, you need to change the shifter(s) and ...


13

Yes, floor pumps can condense water in them. The water is from atmospheric water vapor. When the pump walls are colder than the surrounding air, the vapor can condense just like dew forms on leaves in the morning. Temperature swings assist in the formation of dew and this is made worse by leaving it on concrete, which is not only often much colder than the ...


13

You have the wrong tool. Your cassette lockring removal tool has a long pin emerging from its centre, which would fit inside the axle of a QR compatible wheel, to keep the tool centred. What you have named a skewer is actually the axle and yours is solid, so the axle blocks the tool. The correct and simple way to remove your cassette is to get an ...


12

The little rubber tubes are for repairing Woods/Dunlop valves. The valve core does not have any valve mechanism in itself, but relies on the little rubber tube to seal. The tube fits over rounded end of the valve core shown below. Most of new tubes come with similar-looking valve that has a ball and spring mechanism instead of the rubber tube.


11

It depends to what level you want to disassemble. For general cleaning your list is a good start. As you dig deeper though you'll also need: To service/adjust drivetrain Various spanners and screwdrivers to adjust cables Wire cutters if replacing cables To service wheels/hubs 15mm spanner to remove wheels (unless you have quick release hubs) Chain whip ...


11

The 'official' tool that engages with that bumpy collar is the Shimano TL-PD-40 bearing shaft removal tool. It's a plastic tool designed to be used with a larger wrench, or a vice. Here's a pic: TL-PD-40 If you're interested in servicing your pedals using this tool and others, here's a how-to from Park Tool: http://www.parktool.com/blog/repair-help/spd-...


11

As linac said: "It's a spacer to be inserted between the brake pads while the wheel is removed" Andy P has explained why the spacer is needed. There are a variety of spacers made to work for different disk brake designs. Here are two examples: Here is a picture of the spacer being used


10

Answering as a road cyclist ... For a ride of this duration (less than a day), before starting I take notice of the conditions, and decide what to wear, in how many layers. I want to carry a spare layer to put on during stops, and in case of bad weather. Usually it'll be my lightweight wind and (so called) water proof jacket. Sometimes it's just a ...


10

I'd be very tempted to make a tool roll. You'll need access to a sewing machine that can handle 2-3 layers of canvas, but even most home machines will do that if you're careful (and buy a canvas needle!) You see them mostly today with sets of ring spanners, made of cheap plastic. But in the older days people would generally make them out of canvas, often ...


10

The main distinction is whether the puller is for square taper (and Powerspline) versus Octalink/ISIS. Among square taper crank pullers, there are some older ones made with nutted spindles in mind that don't play nice with the now more common bolt-style ones because their tips are too narrow and can jam into the bolt hole and damage the threads. A couple ...


10

FAG bottom brackets (BB) with plastic mounting rings are very common in Germany. The cartridge bottom bracket is really good and resilient, however the polyamide (PA) mounting rings are horrible. As you found out there is a tool to turn the splined outside (rosette shaped). It is inexpensive and easy to get in Germany (< 10EUR). However, unscrewing the ...


9

I recently bought a bike and it came with this pedal spanner. So I think the easiest thing to do is to write the directions on the spanner!


9

You want the correctly sized Torx driver. When I had to swap to a new wheel set I used a T25 driver. I just found a Park Tool TWS-2 that has 9 different sizes. You can probably find just a T25 driver at a hardware store.


9

This is not going to work. You won't permanently change the shape of the rim by just smooshing it between two concrete discs, as in order to permanently bend metal you need to exceed the yield stress of the metal and plastically deform it. This means that to bend something to a shape, it has to be precisely bent further than its ultimate designed bend, then ...


9

the big wrench below the chain whip Is for removing the cups on shimano hollowtech II bottom bracket. http://www.madegood.org/bikes/repair/remove-a-shimano-hollowtech-bottom-bracket/ the thing in the upper right corner Is for screwing in the preload cap on a shimano hollowtech II bottom bracket. The preload crap is screwed in to the non drive side crank ...


9

Stop. Right now. You don’t have a skewer/quick release system, you have a solid threaded axle that is secured to the frame by nuts. A quick release axle has an axial hole through it for the quick release shaft. What you are trying to remove is the axle itself. This looks like a cup and cone type so if you remove the axle the ball bearings will all fall ...


8

"Useful" is hard to define for everyone. For me, "useful" tends to mean "has a lot of uses". The very specific chain wear-checking tools you list above are "handy" in that they do one thing and they do it reasonably well. Useful? Well...if you need to do it a lot and/or it is difficult. But there is a tried-and-true method using a simple tool that many ...


8

It's a wrench that will work on a range of different size nuts and bolts. Each step on the top ramp will grab a different size. A further advantage is that it will work equally well (or badly) on four sided nuts, and on five and seven sided "security" bolts that a conventional adjustable wrench with parallel jaws will not work on. It will not work ...


8

Bicycle Helmet Suitable clothing and shoes Cellphone Whatever else you "need" depends on your mechanical abilities and how independent you wish to be.


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