Hot answers tagged

12

He is unlikely to have damaged anything unless he's a complete gorilla. Loosen off any bolts or bolt pairs that you are concerned about, then do them back up to torque.


7

Kilograms force. It is tension equal to a weight of that many kilograms pulling on the spoke under earth gravity.


6

I guess you could set your torque wrench to a slightly higher value (e.g. 4.5Nm instead of 4Nm) and see if the bolt moves when you try to turn it. If the bolt moves you know that it hasn’t been tightened to more than the specified value (at least when it was tightened the last time). Afterwards it’s probably a good idea to revert back to the specified value. ...


5

Addressing just the actual question as stated to avoid a 3,000 word essay: With this in mind, how to interpret the advertised torque for a bike with a mid-drive hub, since it's heavily dependant on the transmission? The advertised torque on a mid-drive bike will tell you over how large a band of cadences and how steep a hill the bike can actually provide ...


4

8Nm is a pretty good generic saddle rail torque. Edit: Oh, that’s not a regular 2-bolt seatpost head. If there’s no torque spec anywhere on it, the necessary torque is likely to be even higher, in the 10-12Nm range if not more. This design is basically a fancy single-bolt style post where one bolt tightens wedges that create the clamping force. This is a far ...


4

This Merida manual on page 130 says 5–7Nm or 6–8Nm, depending on which bolt size the clamping mechanism has. I’m not 100% sure the manual applies to your seat post but I assume going up to 7Nm should be safe. You could try carbon installation compound or a retaining compound (e.g. Loctite 603). I’ve also used liquid climbing chalk (magnesium carbonate) when ...


2

Your frame as a steel frame made from a high quality chromium molybdenum steel is generally quite tolerant of torque. Thus, it's not as important to have precisely the recommended torque as it is for e.g. aluminum alloy frames. As far as I know, the only parts screwed to the frame that are essential to riding the bicycle are: Bottom bracket: you will find ...


1

When in doubt, do them yourself. Use reasonable force to loosen them, and tighten them back in to spec. If a bolt doesn't come out, try using PB Blaster or WD-40, or similar. If that doesn't help, you can either try a powered torque driver (carefully, to not crack the frame or strip the threading), or just accept that they are bonded. This is good practice ...


1

1 kilogram or kilogram-force (kg or kgf) = 9.80665 newtons (N) = 35.2739619 ounces (oz) = 1000 grams (g) = 1000000 milligrams (mg) = 2.20462262 pounds (lbs) = 0.157473044 stones (st).


1

If the max. torque on the rails is 6Nm then you shouldn't exceed that in no case. The 12-15Nm is the maximum when the clamp is used with metal rails. In your case, start by taking the clamp apart and clean the bits that touch the rails of your saddle from any remains of grease with a solvent. Check the clamps for sharp edges and give them a sanding with fine ...


1

The expander plug has no load to bear. After the steering has been adjusted and the stem clamped you could theoretically remove the top-cap or at least loosen the bolt. In the early stages of adjustment, the plug needs just to be tight enough to prevent it from being pulled out of the steerer by the top-cap bolt. So 5-6Nm would be a good start for tightening....


1

You use the manufacturer specified torque, which in this case is max 8 Nm but in another component it could be different. That value sounds like more than we are used to in this area of the bike, but it is presumably for a 6 mm hex fastener, in which case it isn't an unusual value - it would be moderate torque on a 6 mm bolt. The resulting force is spread ...


1

Some things to consider: The plugs only purpose is to be strong enough to not move up when you tighten the headset down. The steerer will be clamped by the stem, so the stem will reinforce the steerer once clamped. The top cap recommended torque is probably 4-6Nm. Support the top of the steerer from crushing. Although it is often recomended to add a 5mm ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible