48

To a racer, rolling resistance and handling top the list; durability is far down the list. The coefficient of rolling resistance (Crr) for a racing tire on typical French or Italian roads used during a Grand Tour is about .004, or even lower. The Crr of a puncture resistant tire can be > .01. Crr scales like gradient, so the difference between Crr's of .01 ...


26

The full answer depends exactly on the teams involved and the composition of the break but, in general, the key to understanding this isn't physics as much as it is game theory. In a race like the TdF, there are many separate competitions being run simultaneously: not just for the overall General Classification but also for stage wins, the (green) points ...


20

Puncture resistant tires are heavier relative to non-puncture resistant tires. They also have sloppier handling/less control/higher rolling resistance, and are typically harder to change (though professional racers will usually wheel swap). And you have the question of rider preference -- you're going to set the type of tire + pressures and what not, the way ...


19

The 6.8 kg limit is due to UCI regulation 1.3.019, which you can find here, and thus applies to all races sanctioned by the UCI. It was originally instituted in 2000 in order to ensure that manufacturers didn't produce racing bikes that risked structural integrity, to promote rider safety. At the time, with the then-current technology, that was considered a ...


14

If you have set of identical riders, and one rider puts a slower tyre on, they will lose if no-one gets a puncture (let's simplify and assume a time trial so we can ignore effects of the peloton). Anti-puncture tyres are slower as seen in R. Chung's answer. Of course for a real race of merely very similar riders who may be having good or bad days, it's not ...


14

This is a special device that gathers the following data, according to this article: the stage winner’s top speed, average speed and time per kilometer the fastest riders up key climbs the speed of the winner at the finish line the top speed achieved by a rider on the day average speed across all riders


12

They don't. Here are some links to examples: https://www.bikeradar.com/features/tour-de-france-shoes-gallery/ https://www.bikeradar.com/features/top-5-custom-road-shoes-at-the-tour-de-france/ https://cyclingtips.com/2019/07/photo-gallery-the-best-shoes-of-the-2019-tour-de-france/ You can see some blue ones, yellow ones, orange ones, black ones, purple ones,...


11

The main reason is the 2020 Specialized Shiv provided by their sponsor is only produced in a disc version. You can see an article about the bike here: https://www.bikeradar.com/news/specialized-sworks-shiv-tt-disc/


11

They are GPS trackers with a wireless data connection, GSM or EDGE would be enough for the data rate, but it might be something faster. The company supplying them is Dimension Data you can sign up for a free data report at the end of each stage here.


9

It's just considered to be bad sportsmanship to take advantage of another rider's mechanical problem. The underlying idea is that, as much as possible, the race shouldn't be determined by random strokes of bad luck. It should be won and lost based on riders' strength, bicycle handling proficiency, as understanding of race tactics. It is not technically ...


8

You have to draw the line somewhere. If you allow all doping, then the winner will be the one most willing to sacrifice their long-term health to use the most drugs and maximise performance enhancement. Then why don't they simply limit the doping to forms of doping and medical treatments that have been peer reviewed and demonstrated to be relatively safe?...


7

There's also the somewhat nebulous concept of whether or not "the race is on". Basically if you're cruising along in the peloton it would be extremely bad form to suddenly attack out of nowhere when you hear that the leader has had a mechanical, been caught up in a crash, etc. But if people have already started attacking each other, it's less fair to expect ...


6

Yes, the idea is to have the quickest bike change possible for the person it matters most for. With the bike attached on the same side as the mechanic's, he just opens his door, turns, and grabs the bike. For any other bike, he either has to go around the car, or even remove another bike before getting to the one he needs. As for the obvious followup ...


6

The UCI does have rules for the maximum number of riders. The base max is 28, but you can get extra spots for having new pros on your roster, up to 2 extra spots. The rule comes from section "2.15.110 Riders" of the UCI regulations. This cycling blog has a good explanation of it written up: http://inrng.com/2011/08/max-team-size-uci-rules/


5

Allowing Doping defers the risk of participating until after the end of the event. In normal situations, risk taking that does not pan out is normally associated with losing, so taking risks is self limiting (people who take too many risks lose too often so do not make to to the top levels of sport) Allowing doping means the risk taking involved in the ...


5

Helmets were entirely optional until 5 May 2003. On 5 May 2003 the following rules were introduced https://web.archive.org/web/20160304090208/http://oldsite.uci.ch/english/news/news_2002/20030502i.pdf During competitions on the road, a hard shell crash helmet shall be worn. Except where there are legal provisions to the contrary, riders taking part in ...


4

Don't forget that there is money involved! Every competition in the TDF has a cash prize. Every sprint. Every categorized mountain. Often towns along the way will have their own prizes, such as a cow, or your weight in champagne. Every team wants to take home some of the spoils, but you can't win if you don't play, so teams that aren't winning stages or ...


4

Starting with https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrey_Kivilev In March 2003, he crashed during the Paris–Nice race and subsequently died of his injuries. His death was the trigger for the UCI to implement the compulsory wearing of helmets in all endorsed races. The UCI moved very quickly with a change in regulations: After Kivilev's death, the UCI made the ...


3

The answer is very simple: The times at arrivals for each and every rider are simply added up over the race days. The rider with the lowest total time gets to wear the maillot jaune on the next day. In grouped arrivals of the peloton without any gap, each rider is credited the same time as the winner of the stage. In the unlikely case that all stages end ...


3

The parts of this answer dealing with victory in the general classification apply to any UCI-regulated stage road race that I'm aware of. The overall winner (aka the winner of the general classification) is, in fact, determined by cumulative time on all the stages, added up. However, there are three additional prize classifications: sprints and mountains, ...


3

Cycling is a weird sport because you need to cooperate with your opponents. This leads to all kinds of surprising outcomes, such as choosing not to take advantage of an opponent's mechanical problem. We may refer to this as "poor form," but what it really is is bad politics. Rider A might take advantage of Rider B's bad luck one day, but may be dependent on ...


3

The Official Tour de France website has this information. Alas, it's unlinkable but: Select "Route 2018" from the top menu bar. Click the stage you're interested in. Scroll down to just above the map, where you see "Sport Side"*. Click "Time schedule". Times are given in local time, which is CEST (GMT+2). * The TdF website has always had somewhat ...


3

Depends on whom you ask. Ideally there should be surveys to answer questions like this. Surveys for contenders, team leaders, supporters and so on. Just to get a rough idea. It is certainly possible that, like jim's answer, a majority would say it is not the best sportmanship. But there will also certainly be others saying technical failure is, after all, ...


2

The official website now has a list of all stages with links to (fairly small) maps, route profiles and estimated timings for various points on the route.


2

Unlikely to occur, but of course a crash or medical withdrawal could result in the yellow jersey changing hands on the final day.


2

For most of the past 40 years the Tour has ended with what is essentially a parade along the Champs Elysees (1989 being a big exception!) The modern tour is largely determined by climbing/time trials and with the final day being largely flat there simply isn't a good opportunity for a 2nd place rider to take back enough time. This is especially true in the ...


2

Looks like this is it: https://www.cyclingweekly.com/news/racing/tour-de-france/tour-de-france-live-tv-guide-233516 Tour de France 2018 TV Guide 1 Saturday, July 7 ITV4: 9:30 am - 3:15 pm Eurosport 1: 9:30 am - 3:15 pm 2 Sunday, July 8 ITV4: 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm Eurosport 1: 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm 3 Monday, July 9 ITV4: 1:45 pm - 5:00 pm Eurosport 1: 2:00 ...


1

If you do not race in a UCI race you do not care about this rule at all. If you are thirsty, you drink. The end of the trip is where you are at the greatest danger of bonking so if you feel hungry or weak, just eat or get some quick sugar. Actually, the racers can also do so, but they cannot get new food and new water, they only can use what they have. UCI ...


1

As Weiwen and Carel indicated, the winner of a stage, despite his celebrations, is not in fact the one who is guaranteed to wear the yellow jersey on the subsequent stage—nor, for the last stage, is the one who is guaranteed to have won the race (technically called the "general classification" of the race). For example, if this fourth stage in the ...


1

The root of Tour de France was a celebration in human suffering and perseverance, with anything that undermines this frowned upon. In the original incarnations riders were self-supported including having to do all aspects of bike repair: On the way down from the Tourmalet, Christophe was hit by a race vehicle, and his fork broke, rendering his bike ...


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