44

The distinctions are often subtle: The touring bike will of course be slightly more heavily built (generally a steel frame). The touring bike will have a longer wheelbase. You will generally notice that the space between the seat tube and the rear wheel is fairly wide. (The longer wheelbase serves 3 purposes: More stable, smoother ride, better fender ...


37

Road Road bikes are designed for performance on (mostly) well paved roads. They are the lightest weight of the 3 categories, have the shortest wheelbase, lowest bottom bracket, and the steepest headtube angles. These geometry features allow the bike to react to rider inputs quickly and to have a low center of gravity which is beneficial when turning. ...


23

Focussing on the "training harder" aspect of your question: A simple way for training hard while keeping your speed comparatively low would be to increase your cadence. The easiest approach: Try switching a gear or two lower than you normally feel comfortable with, meaning you will have to pedal faster to keep the same speed. One of the advantages of ...


21

Commuter or city bikes are designed for paved surfaces. A suspension fork on such a bike is not going to add much comfort, except perhaps when riding over potholes or kerbs, which are avoidable. Suspension forks add weight, which brings a different type of discomfort as you have to exert effort to move that weight around. This gets worse the more ...


19

Their main problem is your first bullet hypothesis: They can't cope as well with sustained braking on descent, as that is where brakes are challenged the hardest. Even with the extra cooling fins, on a long descent, the brake may overheat, and may catastrophically fail. Riders using roller brakes have reported the brakes getting hot enough to ignite the ...


19

First, congratulations on trying to do this, and doing some research before your try. The bike really doesn't matter very much. You can ride 500 miles carrying enough stuff to be comfortable on just about any bike, a better bike will be faster, more comfortable and more reliable. But I've been on a 3000 mile ride with a couple of people who rode KMart-level ...


19

If you want to play nice, this ride is going to be quite gentle and sociable for you. That means it could be a good fit for a recovery ride. Read up on recovery riding, but you should find it’s recommended to have a nice steady ride where you keep your heart rate down low (like zone 2), and if you get it too elevated, even by a little bit you spoil the whole ...


17

Mountain bikes have been pressed into service as touring machines for a long time. Old hardtail mountain bikes make great, bristly touring machines, and they're fun to ride. Tires The first thing you'll want to look at are the tires. Most mountain bikes come with knobby tires for riding on dirt and gravel. A set of slicks or semi-slick tires will decrease ...


16

There are a couple of reasons. The KISS Principle If anything vital breaks while you're touring and you can't fix it on the spot, you're stranded. You're too far from home to call your mom for a ride. Unless you have a spare for the broken part, your options are some DIY jerry rigging and/or praying that someone with a truck comes by who will carry you and ...


16

Yes. Disc brake rotors can warp a little in use, or get bent from impacts and straightening them is routine maintenance. The basic procedure is to find spots where the rotor is bent inboard or outboard, and carefully incrementally bend it back. There are tools made for this purpose (e.g. Park tool DT-2) but the job can be done with a large adjustable wrench....


15

You should find that on those bikes everything is a bit stronger and heavier than a standard touring bike. Not only are they expected to carry more weight, they're designed to be ridden into places where failures are more difficult to recover from. As well, because they're designed to be ridden off road they'll usually have a lower top tube for better stand-...


15

Converting between drop and flat bars is generally a huge amount of hassle. As you say, there are all kinds of incompatibility issues around brakes and shifters, and the geometry of the frame is designed with particular bars in mind, because changing the bars makes a big difference to riding position. There's no point spending £1400 on a bike and then ...


14

Any bike can be used for touring long distances. The main question is, what type of touring do you want to do? If you want to do self-supported touring (you carry the luggage yourself on the bike vs. a car transports the stuff for the whole group), you need a bike that can take luggage. The other main feature I look for in a touring bike is comfort, ...


13

There are a lot of question so I will settle on the one in the title. How many years will an current aluminum frame last of a touring bike? Depends: Don't know what aluminum frame Construction is a larger factor than material Don't know the use Use is a larger factor than material Don't know how you are going to care for the bike Care/maintenance is ...


13

The current generation of pre-manufactured winter tires you'd get from brands like Schwalbe do not use 'screw-in' style studs that have a point on the inside surface. They have a pocket and flange design: I don't know of a source for actual data on this other than personal anecdote, so I can offer that. I have never had the stud on a commercially made/...


12

Mid range touring bikes come with shocks because because mid range consumers will buy them. Department store bikes come with full suspension because people buy them. High end touring bikes don't come with shocks because high end consumers don't see the value. A bicycle does not need to be used for how it is classified/designed. I use a cyclocross with ...


12

Short and simple... Nobody with the cash to spend on a high end touring bike thinks they are worthwhile. Given the increasing specialization in the bike market, they only reason they don't exist is nobody will buy them.


12

I find the ideal commuter bike is: lightweight, reliable, and inexpensive. Reliable: A commuter bike can’t fail or you’ll be late for work. Light weight: it has to be lightweight as you’re navigating it around bike stands, carrying it up stairs, taking it over curbs, and putting it on bus racks or in the trunk of a car that’s come to pick you up when and ...


11

I'm going to attack this backwards. First of all, camping is the only way you won't have to worry all day about where you're going to sleep. Provided you don't take a route through inhospitable areas, the beauty of planning to camp is in most areas down there, you can pull over, a good distance from the road, and set up camp. It will probably be cold at ...


11

Don't buy a €3K first bike! Instead, split your budget and get one for <1K. There are plenty of good advice here already (my vote goes to randonneur-type bike), and each of the suggested types can be had for that price. Don't aim at the highest specs: you don't know yet what you'll need. Just get something decent in the middle. Indeed, get to your local ...


10

There are a bunch of bikes sold in the UK that are specifically designed for the cycle-to-work scheme: they have good specs for commuting, are priced to come in under the £1000 limit, etc. A number of online vendors stock these. So that would be a good place to start. Or find someone selling one of those bikes used. The additional weight of a steel bike is ...


9

For cycling across China you want a reliable bike that is unlikely to give you trouble, and which can be repaired with "local" resources if it does. Forget about "lighter" wheels -- you want reliable wheels, and a pound less weight (if that) from a lighter wheel will not make any difference. And I'd stay away from a geared hub, unless you can find one that ...


9

'Bulk' is mostly about whether all of your luggage will fit in your bags. ie is the volume of your luggage less than the capacity of your bags. So it depends on how much stuff you want to take, and how big your panniers are. Aerodynamics doesn't really matter for touring. Unless you are cycling rather fast, or it is very windy. Usually the weight of your ...


9

As has been pointed out, closed brakes are not ideal from the standpoint of disipating the energy built up through friction. This has also been experienced in the automotive world, where drum brakes were standard during many decades. Some would say they still are, e.g. on rear axels of light commercial vehicles such as pick-up trucks. However, although ...


9

It might be salvageable but the cost of: new chain ($10) new tires and tubes ($25) rear cluster (maybe; $20) new brake cables and pads ($10) new derailleur cables ($10) which is the minimal repair, is going to be around $75 in just parts, that’s if you get the dirt cheapest versions. If any of your bearings or hubs are seized, you’ll need to rebuild them ...


9

I'd go for a longer bike rather than a short one. This helps handling at speed and makes it easier to hold a line. A shorter bike needs steering input all the time, whereas a longer / more relaxed geometry will track by itself, but will need more effort to turn. A packbike is no use if you can't carry the things you need. For some that might be as ...


9

If possible, position yourself at the back of the group. You can even lead from there with a small group. Staying at the back allows you to encourage those who are struggling or taking it easy, and means you're not always glancing over your shoulder to check whether you've left them behind. As a result going slowly feels much more natural than it does ...


9

Given your budget you'll be looking at aluminum or steel framed bikes, but that's fine. There are many choices of steel or aluminum drop-bar bikes available. The first thing I would think about is how much gear do you need to carry when commuting? Can you carry everything you need in a backpack or will you need panniers or other on-bike luggage? mass is ...


8

I have some BR-IM45s, and some BR-IM70s (which have large cooling fins), on a couple of my bikes, although they're only used for relatively lightly-loaded commuting (typically only around 20m per day, load of around 15kgs, rolling along at 15mph). They're actually pretty easy to strip down and service, though this simply consists of disassembly, degrease, ...


8

They're called simply chainring bolts. The tool to hold the other part while tightening is chainring bolt wrench.


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