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44

The distinctions are often subtle: The touring bike will of course be slightly more heavily built (generally a steel frame). The touring bike will have a longer wheelbase. You will generally notice that the space between the seat tube and the rear wheel is fairly wide. (The longer wheelbase serves 3 purposes: More stable, smoother ride, better fender ...


30

How's this for ultimate lounging - you could add a projector that projects onto the sail, not only could you read ebooks while you cycle, but also watch the occasional movie! very nice ergonomics, no need to strain your neck.


29

A fit person can do 50km without too much difficulty, though they'll probably be sore from the effort if they don't cycle much, just because cycling uses different muscles to, say, running. It wouldn't be easy, but it wouldn't be too hard. It sounds like you're not very fit. If you were determined, you could probably make it around 50km but I doubt it ...


26

In most cases with bicycle parts, more expensive means lighter. There can be exceptions, especially when you get to the super low end parts where cheaper can also mean cheaper construction. Since you put so many miles on your bike and it seems important to you, I would spend the extra 2 pounds and grab the Acera. XT is generally used on mountain bikes where ...


19

First, congratulations on trying to do this, and doing some research before your try. The bike really doesn't matter very much. You can ride 500 miles carrying enough stuff to be comfortable on just about any bike, a better bike will be faster, more comfortable and more reliable. But I've been on a 3000 mile ride with a couple of people who rode KMart-level ...


18

By breaking in your Brooks B17 etc. leather saddle, you create the "valleys" in the leather for your sitbones and the crotch area of the pelvis bone. Therefore you need enough time for the leather to deform at these three areas. There is various information on the net. My experience is that about 500km of riding (so about 25h at 20 km/h) gives a good enough ...


18

Those of us who tow bike trailers have generally encountered a situation where some other road user underestimates your total length. If your road-train bike was three units long there's more opportunity for someone else to screw-up and clip the end of your setup. An off-road path or a park would be a much safer way to try this - if you intend to ride this ...


17

Mountain bikes have been pressed into service as touring machines for a long time. Old hardtail mountain bikes make great, bristly touring machines, and they're fun to ride. Tires The first thing you'll want to look at are the tires. Most mountain bikes come with knobby tires for riding on dirt and gravel. A set of slicks or semi-slick tires will decrease ...


17

This is what I tell everyone to get first when they get a new bike: Seatbag, to hold the following: Spare tube (maybe two) Small multitool Mini-pump or CO2 inflator Tire patch kit 2x tire levers That assumes you have bidons and cages. Those six things should get you by for many miles and should get you out of any trailside emergencies. As with ...


17

Sounds like a bad idea. The biggest concern would be how the setup would act under hard braking, especially when going down an incline. There will a lot of mass to stop which means your stopping distance will be very long. Additionally the trailer and tag-along chain will be unstable under braking and may jack-knife. Update: If you are going to try this ...


16

There are a couple of reasons. The KISS Principle If anything vital breaks while you're touring and you can't fix it on the spot, you're stranded. You're too far from home to call your mom for a ride. Unless you have a spare for the broken part, your options are some DIY jerry rigging and/or praying that someone with a truck comes by who will carry you and ...


15

A recovery ride is a ride where you go at a very easy pace for 90-120 minutes. The idea of it is to give all those over-worked muscles some gentle exercise so that they don't tighten up, while flooding them with nutrients to help them repair. For people in training, it's a day off to just enjoy riding. I ride with a friend on his recovery ride because ...


15

You should find that on those bikes everything is a bit stronger and heavier than a standard touring bike. Not only are they expected to carry more weight, they're designed to be ridden into places where failures are more difficult to recover from. As well, because they're designed to be ridden off road they'll usually have a lower top tube for better stand-...


14

Any bike can be used for touring long distances. The main question is, what type of touring do you want to do? If you want to do self-supported touring (you carry the luggage yourself on the bike vs. a car transports the stuff for the whole group), you need a bike that can take luggage. The other main feature I look for in a touring bike is comfort, ...


14

There is a lot of complete and utter non-sense around Brooks saddles. When it comes to saddles, everything works for somebody and nothing works for everybody. Rule #1. If it's not reasonably comfortable on Day 1, it will never be comfortable. Saddle comfort is about getting the right shape to match your backside, leather saddles like the Brooks will ...


14

It's probably not a great idea. Start with a shorter route and see how you do. Pick a flat route without hills. Make sure you have a bail out and a way to get home (public transport, a friend, Uber etc.). You probably should get a bike shop to have a look over your bike for any issues, you don't want to get stranded by something going wrong or have any ...


13

As I may have given away in the comments, I'm not a fan of sensory deprivation when you're as vulnerable as you are when you're on a bike. I don't think there are many scenarios where not being able to hear as good as you possibly can is safe on a bike — but you may not agree and safety really isn't the point of this answer. My belief is that when you ...


13

There are a lot of question so I will settle on the one in the title. How many years will an current aluminum frame last of a touring bike? Depends: Don't know what aluminum frame Construction is a larger factor than material Don't know the use Use is a larger factor than material Don't know how you are going to care for the bike Care/maintenance is ...


13

Riding 50 miles (80km) in a day is a fairly modest goal. Doing it three days in a row is only slightly more ambitious. As a fit (as you will be when you do it) person to ride 80km, you could expect to take 3 to 3.5 hours if you rode hard, and 4 hours if you took it easy. The difference is how you will feel the next day. For the actual ride, plan on taking ...


13

180 km is a long way for someone who only normally does 20-30km (to quote @PeterH in chat). To my way of thinking, you could do it, with some pre-conditions Do some longer rides, where you ride 30km to somewhere, have lunch, and ride back. Ride on some of the potential routes, to understand the traffic situation. Plan ahead, so that you do it over two or ...


13

I think it's obvious that you'll need a heads-up display in order to see the road through the text you're reading. Safety first and all that. So you're going to want to combine this project with a fairing. The alternative is to hack your reader of choice to use a scanning laser projector, in order to paint the text on the road in front of you.


12

This may depend on what you enjoy doing. For me, the very act of exercise will stop me being bored, and cycling wins on so many fronts. But if you need to actively do stuff, how about: focus on the weather, on a good day feel the breeze watch the scenery talk to others in your group (I'm less keen on this, as I like a quiet cycle) give yourself challenges, ...


12

Mid range touring bikes come with shocks because because mid range consumers will buy them. Department store bikes come with full suspension because people buy them. High end touring bikes don't come with shocks because high end consumers don't see the value. A bicycle does not need to be used for how it is classified/designed. I use a cyclocross with ...


12

Short and simple... Nobody with the cash to spend on a high end touring bike thinks they are worthwhile. Given the increasing specialization in the bike market, they only reason they don't exist is nobody will buy them.


12

In my experience (week long camping / bike touring trips), I have never thought "Man, I wish I had a chair." I have often thought, "I have packed way too much stuff." There are a few things to consider. You have looked into weight and cost, but there is also space and time considerations. Volume: Do you have space on your rack to put this? How small does ...


12

I just used a 5mm bolt with locking nut, and a ~15mm wide washer on the inside when this happened to my Ortleib. If you use stainless steel bolt, nut and washers it won't rust and the pressure against the pannier materials stops it leaking. I'd use the biggest washer you can find on the inside, but the biggest I could find was only 15mm. If you look at the ...


12

Yes, its been done before, there are various configurations. Google for 'Bikepacking tarp shelter' for many ideas. Good resources for this type of thing are bikepacking.net forums and in the UK Bear bones bikepacking. Here are some examples:


12

A serious answer - consider an MP3 player and an audio-book instead. While sound-isolating headphones are bad for awareness, a single (ie mono) speaker can work quite well. Personally I use two different items depending on the nature of the ride. A small MP3 player with a build-in speaker that lives inside my helmet buff. Its quiet and invisible and ...


11

I have been barked at by dogs and they looked like they were about to attack. So i barked and growled louder, I have never seen such a surprized look on a dogs face before. I kind of wonder what I said in dog language. That kinda surprized my neighbor too (not the dogs owner)!!!!! One other time I was chased by a dog so I stopped to growl and he came up to ...


11

My preference is for SPD clipless pedals and "walkable" clipless shoes. But I still have a pair of lightweight "tennis shoes" in my gear for campsite, days off, etc. Another option, if you can still find them, is the old-fashioned "touring" shoes and regular toe straps. "Touring" shoes are (or were) quite walkable, and it's reasonable to walk miles in ...


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