Hot answers tagged

29

A fit person can do 50km without too much difficulty, though they'll probably be sore from the effort if they don't cycle much, just because cycling uses different muscles to, say, running. It wouldn't be easy, but it wouldn't be too hard. It sounds like you're not very fit. If you were determined, you could probably make it around 50km but I doubt it ...


26

In most cases with bicycle parts, more expensive means lighter. There can be exceptions, especially when you get to the super low end parts where cheaper can also mean cheaper construction. Since you put so many miles on your bike and it seems important to you, I would spend the extra 2 pounds and grab the Acera. XT is generally used on mountain bikes where ...


13

It's probably not a great idea. Start with a shorter route and see how you do. Pick a flat route without hills. Make sure you have a bail out and a way to get home (public transport, a friend, Uber etc.). You probably should get a bike shop to have a look over your bike for any issues, you don't want to get stranded by something going wrong or have any ...


11

To answer your questions - "Is it possible to do 50 km distance without any previous training? - Yes, it is possible, assuming by no previous training you mean cycling training. If a person has been active in running or other aerobic activity using their legs it is possible to ride 50 km without any previous bicycle training. In your situation it may be ...


11

Don't buy a €3K first bike! Instead, split your budget and get one for <1K. There are plenty of good advice here already (my vote goes to randonneur-type bike), and each of the suggested types can be had for that price. Don't aim at the highest specs: you don't know yet what you'll need. Just get something decent in the middle. Indeed, get to your local ...


8

I've got a few individually wrapped tablets (and equivalent powders) that came as samples. I never use them when starting from home instead saving them for carrying with me. This works for long hot days, but on a multi-day trip would soon run out, and the packaging is wasteful. The tubes protect the tablets from crushing, though they add bulk compared to ...


7

I went on two bike tours in 2017 and 2018 around North America, for 3000+ miles each, and this is what I did to secure the panniers to the bicycle: Nothing. That said, I did take some precautions. Whenever possible I locked the bike in a highly visible location, preferably with some security cameras pointing at it, and preferably visible inside the ...


7

The most frugal is not to intensively clean these parts except at the end of the tour when you overhaul your bike. Simply brushing off the dirt with a cleaning brush, toothbrush, or rag and relubricating with a good dry lube will get you most of the benefits with little of the mess. And it’s a lighter kit. You don’t need a spotless bike.


7

XT will shift a bit better and be lighter, but probably won't last any longer. The difference between the Sora and Acera is probably down to largest cog size - on MTB sets its larger. (Road will be around 11-28, MTB 11-34). The way I buy cassettes is decide a price point and look for something being sold at the biggest discount, so I aim for great value ...


7

Stuffing the free space in the container with tissue paper has worked for me fairly well in the past. Alternatively, just embrace it and move from tablets to a powder, which is what I use now - it's easier to pack into other containers / bags and can be easier to fit into luggage or pockets etc. Just make sure the container you choose seals well - that ...


6

I have no idea what explains the price difference. Well, basically: quality of materials and construction. Lighter weight, stronger materials are more expensive. Better designs tend to be more complicated which means more manufacturing steps at higher precision, which costs more to execute. There's also demand and what consumers in the market will pay. ...


6

I have around 1 year touring experience in South America. Mostly remote dirt roads and trails. I would never ever purposely run tubes again. As long as you are confident in your tubeless setup flats should be almost nonexistent. I only carry one tube for emergency that has never been used. A small bottle of spare sealant is pretty essential to top off if ...


5

20 years ago, this would have been exactly your choice - either a pure race bike or a touring bike, and very little in between. Fortunately there is a huge amount of choice in the market now, and you can find a bike anywhere on the spectrum between those two extremes. A few questions you may want to ask yourself: Are you riding just on road, or off-road as ...


5

I didn't think this was possible, but Google came up with this site (in Dutch) https://www.fietsverhuur.nl Apparently they deliver rental bikes in Belgium, The Netherlands, Germany and Luxemburg. I assume they can also arrange a pickup at a different location, if the price is right 😉. It isn't clear if this is just for groups, but you could contact them ...


5

You have said you're planning on taking: Spare inner tubes, Jet pump, Multi tool kit, Tyre levers, Gel bars, Fluids, Cash & Card So you've covered flat tyres, energy, hydration and money. Other suggested repair items: chain tool, quick links, spoke tool, zip ties, strong tape. Unforeseen circumstances: mobile telephone/cellphone, emergency contact ...


4

This seems very unlikely. It's possible for car rental because the same company has premises in both cities and they do enough volume of business that having a few cars move from place to place won't make a huge difference to them. That doesn't seem likely for bikes. However, Brussels is only two hours from Amsterdam on the train, and you can take bikes on ...


4

As Daniel already mentioned in the comments, you can thread a small cable lock through the panniers. For example this BBB MicroSafe BBL-10 weighs just 46g for a length of 120cm: Generally I think the risk is relatively low (who wants a pannier full of smelly clothes and worn cooking equipment?) but hard to mitigate since cutting through the panniers is ...


4

It is rumored that the god father of Mountain Biking Keith Bontrager once stated that components have 3 characteristics cheap, light and durable. The problem is you only get to pick two. The low end of a component line tends to be relatively inexpensive but also likely to be heavy. The top of the product line tends to be the most expensive and the lightest ...


3

I can share my own experience. When I was young, maybe around twenty, I went on a 50-60 km bicycle trip without previous training. Of course I had occasionally used a bicycle before. After about 20 km my legs started to cramp and I was forced to make some short stops (5-10 min) to recover. So I was able to finish my trip, but it was hard. Another time (...


3

In the end, the only option I found is Rent a road bike. They do have hybrid bikes (which are cheaper than road bikes), but they charge a fee for cross-border one-way rentals. Overall on the expensive side, but they do exactly what I asked.


3

I too could not choose between a road / racing bike or a touring bike. I ended up getting a Trek 720 as it's a very fast for a touring bike but also more robust that most road bikes. As I got more into touring I ended up getting something dedicated to just that, but the Trek is still my daily rider.


3

TL;DR: If you want a bike that will take anything you throw at it, get a cyclocross bike. If you're pretty sure that you'll be carrying panniers, get a touring bike. If you plan to race competitively, get a race bike. Your budget is high enough that you can get a high quality bike in whatever category you want. You're not really going to the benefits ...


2

There are also the in-between bikes, sometimes called randonneur type bikes An example is this: They are moderately lightweight, but with panniers, mudguards and lights. The geometry is also more relaxed than most racing bikes. For a budget of €3000 you should be able to get a very well-specced bike. Most likely out of reach are integrated hub gears like ...


2

As a beginner, and with an interest in longer distance rinding including some riding on poor quality prepared surfaces (bumpy tarmac, flat gravel), these are the features I would look for: Relatively upright cockpit geometry Relatively stable steering geometry Ability to take wider tires Mounting points for panniers and racks Those are going to be known ...


2

This is a variation on John's answer. The most important of the questions he asks is about the street surfaces you'll ride. A race bike with its small, hard tires and stiff frame is most enjoyable on smooth tarmac. If there is any chance you'll ride on unpaved roads (forest, field) or cobblestone you should not get a race bike. There is also a chance that a ...


2

I think the answer is maybe. Yes you can, but the panniers may have to be quite far back to avoid pedal and seat strikes that it's a compromise. That's if you can find an existing product, or commission a bespoke rack, that's suitable for your luggage weight and shape, wheel size, suspension geometry and axle arrangement. A couple of sensible alternatives: ...


2

Bear in mind that a good quality touring bike is quite light and "efficient". The difference between a touring bike and an all-out racing bike, in terms of obtainable speed, is only of significance if you're actually racing professionally (or at least as a very competitive amateur). Update: In my haste to make this post I failed to give my favorite answer, ...


2

XT cassettes are a slightly different and more complicated design. The large sprockets are on a nice aluminium carrier for lighter weight. Unfortunately this means they're not as strong - we folded one on our MTB tandem. We've not broken a cheaper one. So I'd buy one of the cheaper ones.


2

My friend did 60 km previous weekend but he says it was a tough day. He does not exactly train but he is quite frequent casual rider. I would only take the challenge if it is possible to end the ride at few places along the route (at train stations, etc). You may also need to do this because of your old bike failing rather than you. While the riding itself ...


2

Hose clamps should be more than adequate, although they will chew up the paint on your forks. You might consider an intermediate layer (could be as simple as electrical tape) to protect the paint. And of course give the setup a shakedown ride, and monitor it during the big ride. There are strings that are stronger than fishing line (you can get carbon-fiber ...


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