Hot answers tagged

30

How's this for ultimate lounging - you could add a projector that projects onto the sail, not only could you read ebooks while you cycle, but also watch the occasional movie! very nice ergonomics, no need to strain your neck.


23

Inertia. Bottles are about that big because that's how big bottle cages are, because that's how big bottles are.... repeat. Another cause is that a 10cm bottle would be larger and harder to hold/easier to drop while riding. Most riders would drink while rolling on the bike, so its potentially bumpy, with a layer of sweat/sunscreen/rain making things a bit ...


18

Those of us who tow bike trailers have generally encountered a situation where some other road user underestimates your total length. If your road-train bike was three units long there's more opportunity for someone else to screw-up and clip the end of your setup. An off-road path or a park would be a much safer way to try this - if you intend to ride this ...


17

Sounds like a bad idea. The biggest concern would be how the setup would act under hard braking, especially when going down an incline. There will a lot of mass to stop which means your stopping distance will be very long. Additionally the trailer and tag-along chain will be unstable under braking and may jack-knife. Update: If you are going to try this ...


13

I think it's obvious that you'll need a heads-up display in order to see the road through the text you're reading. Safety first and all that. So you're going to want to combine this project with a fairing. The alternative is to hack your reader of choice to use a scanning laser projector, in order to paint the text on the road in front of you.


12

A serious answer - consider an MP3 player and an audio-book instead. While sound-isolating headphones are bad for awareness, a single (ie mono) speaker can work quite well. Personally I use two different items depending on the nature of the ride. A small MP3 player with a build-in speaker that lives inside my helmet buff. Its quiet and invisible and ...


11

What is the best E-reader to use on a touring bike? What will mount well on a drop bar, withstand the vibration, and not jiggle so much that you can't read it? Something like Google Glass (yes, The Glass is back) would be a good solution. There are several different versions of this type of technology. Products like: Optinvent ORA Vuzix M100 GlassUp ...


10

As noted above, the reason for not using fatter bottles is being able to have a firm enough grip on them to grab them, drink and stow them again with one hand while riding. The best solution for easily carrying large amounts of water is a hydration pack, but they're definitely not for everyone. (Not me either; I can't stand riding with that much weight on ...


10

People tour on all kinds of bikes. That said, if you're going to tour on the Domane, you'll need to figure out how you'll be carrying your gear, since (as Argenti mentions in his comment), it doesn't have any mounting points for racks. There are workarounds for mounting a rack (which come with compromises), and increasingly people are bikepacking—using frame ...


9

I've got a few individually wrapped tablets (and equivalent powders) that came as samples. I never use them when starting from home instead saving them for carrying with me. This works for long hot days, but on a multi-day trip would soon run out, and the packaging is wasteful. The tubes protect the tablets from crushing, though they add bulk compared to ...


9

One reason is the industry measures weight savings in $10's/gram - water heavy, ergo it is expensive. Cyclists tend to plan to refill with water on route if they need large amounts. A couple of typical bottles gives around 2 litres - large enough for a days riding for 95% of riders, of the remaining 5%, 4.5% use a bladder. This means the market for a ...


8

For a start you can get bigger cages. I use a Topeak Modula EX sometimes, which is adjustable to ⌀74 mm (also for the Modula II, with a metal clip instead of plastic). This is noticeably bigger than a standard cage, and is good for many sizes bottled water is sold in. The Modula range might include the biggest bottle holders: the Modula Java is meant for ...


7

I have around 1 year touring experience in South America. Mostly remote dirt roads and trails. I would never ever purposely run tubes again. As long as you are confident in your tubeless setup flats should be almost nonexistent. I only carry one tube for emergency that has never been used. A small bottle of spare sealant is pretty essential to top off if ...


7

Stuffing the free space in the container with tissue paper has worked for me fairly well in the past. Alternatively, just embrace it and move from tablets to a powder, which is what I use now - it's easier to pack into other containers / bags and can be easier to fit into luggage or pockets etc. Just make sure the container you choose seals well - that ...


7

I was out in 28C and 50% RH yesterday, not touring, but comparable: a century (160km) at a fast touring pace, laden by the standards of a day ride, and with a brief swim break in the afternoon. It was hard work (much harder than it would be 10 degrees cooler), but still enjoyable. You have to plan on being able to obtain water. I got through about 4 litres,...


7

Regarding durability, I'm sure the Trek Domane SL5 2021 can take a bit of a battering, but I personally would be wary of taking anything with a carbon frame on a tour. I did a 3.5 week tour of Japan myself last year (best time of my life!) and no joke, I smashed one of the seat-stays into a bicycle gate thing between Osaka and Kyoto on my first day of riding....


6

You may start breaking spokes in the rear wheel after putting some miles on the bike. That seems to be where the effects of load shows up first. You can plan to mitigate this by budgeting for a new rear wheel. If this is the bike you are talking about it has 28 spoke wheels. You'll want a 32 or even a 36 spoke replacement wheel, hand built. You don't have to ...


6

tourers basically live on their bikes and that cycling is a sport that really makes people sweat Tourers may basically live on their bikes, but it does not need to be a sport that really makes people sweat unless on (steep) climbs in sunny or hot weather. I've done some moderate 2-5 day multi-day trips in Scandinavia, and I rarely sweat. Touring is (...


5

In the current situation I have time on my hands to try things, but only at home (hence the cramped pictures below, with garden toys in). An injury meant last year's trip didn't happen as planned, but I bought the tarp anyway. As I commented before, keeping the bike upright with guy ropes should work, and it does. Here they're attached to the drops. To ...


5

You have said you're planning on taking: Spare inner tubes, Jet pump, Multi tool kit, Tyre levers, Gel bars, Fluids, Cash & Card So you've covered flat tyres, energy, hydration and money. Other suggested repair items: chain tool, quick links, spoke tool, zip ties, strong tape. Unforeseen circumstances: mobile telephone/cellphone, emergency contact ...


5

The hub for 8 to 10 speed are the same. You are good to go. You should not need any spacer for them. However, if you mean this hub https://bike.shimano.com/en-US/product/component/tiagra-4700/FH-RS400.html they say it is a 10/11 speed hub and hence you need a (1.85 mm, as mentioned in a comment) spacer for 8 to 10 speed for this one. Those are included by ...


5

There's a more simple answer for bottle size which no-one seems to have touched on. For safety, cyclists need one hand on the bars at all times, which means any water bottle needs to be able to be used in one hand. Yes I'm sure many of you can ride no-hands on flat pavement - so can I. Now show us in town in traffic, or on a trail, or when you're trying to ...


3

I've just returned from several months touring in South + Central America. Tyres for 27.5" and 29er were the most common, and generally easy to find in cities or larger towns. I was running 700c and had difficulty finding decent tyres for this size (coudnt use 29er due to clearance issues). Spare rims/hubs for anything upto 32h are also readily availible, ...


3

In contrast to the other answer, I suggest going straight for a large but compressible saddlebag. I have the largest topeak backloader (15 litres) but roll it down to about 1/3 of that for long day rides when I want to be self sufficient. This will serve you well as you move towards multi day rides, while being immediately useful. It's also a good place to ...


3

For one day you are often fine with your jersey pockets and a small saddle bag. If needing more I would: increase the saddle bag and/or add another small bag above the top tube behind your stem. Photo Topeak I would leave large saddlebags, handlebar bags, frame triangle bags and so on for serious touring. They can be awkward but have their place when ...


3

As far as I’m aware handlebar bags are usually quite heavy, affect handling and can be hard to mount on road bike handlebars. I try to avoid large bags, instead I use Clothes which you can easily store in your jersey or just roll down. Arm warmers, leg warmers, headband. Clothes which work in a wide variety of conditions. For example a Castelli Gabba (...


3

I think the mounting points are for fenders only. If you have the rim brake version you could use a pannier rack with Quick Release Axle adapter. For example this one directly from Trek or this adapter from Tubus with a Tubus Fly Classic rack. Considering the relatively lightweight wheels, the road rim brakes, the carbon frame and the frame geometry I’d ...


3

The exact answer depends on the individual, but there are some general aspects worth noting. Sweating The only way for humans to cool down is through sweat evaporation (as this article explains). If the air is also very humid, sweat will not evaporate as effectively because the surrounding air is close to being saturated with water (56% is normal, though). ...


3

I've not studied any of the science at all and I am only speaking of my personal experience touring thousands of km in the summer through the very humid southeast US and great plains regions. Hopefully you may find some of it useful or at least entertaining. As a general rule I would get up at or before sunrise and cycle until 10-11 am, sometimes later, ...


3

There are already a lot of good answers here, so I'll keep this fairly short. An important number to pay attention to is the dew point or the heat index. The heat index is essentially a combination of the dew point and temperature to get the "feels like" temperature. A good rule of thumb is that a dew point below 15 C is comfortable. Between 15 and ...


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