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I think it very much depends on your style of touring. Some folding bikes ride surprisingly well (e.g. a Tern Eclipse P20 with its 26" wheels and 12kg weight), but they are still inferior to a good touring or road bike. So if your priority is on riding (and far and fast at that) there is really no way around a normal bike. However, a folding bike does ...


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For the same price as a Brompton you can find several folding bikes that are much better suited to touring. Last week I saw a couple on Dahon (I guess 24" wheel) foldable bikes that looked a lot more suited for longer rides. Make sure you get a bike that suits your style of riding, not just one that folds.


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I don't think there is a simple answer. It depends on the touring you want to do and your tradeoff between transport trouble and riding trouble. My wife and I went on a guided tour in Spain where we rented bikes from the operator but one couple brought their own DF (diamond frame) bikes. They had a fair amount of trouble transporting the bikes-on the ...


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A low gear of 24:50 would be 15.4 gear inches, which is low and should get up most paved roads eventually. However its slow and spending hours slogging away at a climb is no fun, so your endurance is important. You'd be doing 4.4 km/h at 60 RPM. At the other end, don't discount the importance of some high gearing too. For every climb there is a descent, ...


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What you're describing is a "mullet drivetrain", that is, road shifters with mountain derailleurs & gears. There are a lot of variations on this. Here's a guide. Note that some of these require third-party adapters to make them work. Some of these permutations offer a lower gear than you might need or want. Another alternative would be a ...


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A gps tracker costs 25... actually there are some for 15 euros. Problem is if it ends up in a 20 story tower block. Buy a piezo buzzer which does 95dB or 120dB and make it into an alarm... power it with any 9-12v battert of 30-50 grams. Make an electrical contact which can be jammed open using a plastic insert the size of an SD Card. Attach an invisible ...


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I think that if you ask around, many people regard many or most of the rules set out by the Union Cycliste International (UCI, or International Cycling Union in English) to be arbitrary. While I don't follow professional racing extremely closely, I also believe that at least some of the rules are not consistently enforced from race to race. For example, this ...


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If you do not race in a UCI race you do not care about this rule at all. If you are thirsty, you drink. The end of the trip is where you are at the greatest danger of bonking so if you feel hungry or weak, just eat or get some quick sugar. Actually, the racers can also do so, but they cannot get new food and new water, they only can use what they have. UCI ...


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A good example of using 20" wheels for a serious bicycle is the Moulton. Although there is nothing of a BMX bike except the 20 inch wheels. The problem with using a BMX frame is that it is sized very small. This makes it difficult for a rider to find an efficient riding position for long rides. The points about the smaller wheels benefits in the ...


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