27

They don't start slow because they are on a fixed gear (track) bike. They start slow because they are trying to coax the other rider into starting the sprint for the finish line before they do. The advantage is typically given to the rider behind the other because you have not only the element of surprise, but you also get a draft off the person in front. ...


16

Saddle height for new bike setup purposes should always be set relative to the pedal, not the BB center or any other reference point. So yes, crank length makes a difference. Using the ground or BB center as a reference point is convenient for re-establishing a given height after the post has been moved, but not for setting up one bike to have the same leg ...


14

Track cyclists are travelling in excess of 30mph. At that speed you need eyewear to protect from the 'wind'.


14

You seem like you want three different bikes all smashed up into one, and the result is not going to be good. First, the time trial frame is not intended to be a track frame. If you're going to race at the track, use a frame and components that are designed for the track. For starters, the time trial frame will have a lower bottom bracket, dramatically ...


14

In track (velodrome) racing, visible cycle computer displays are generally not permitted. So the only funny looks will be from the commissaire who will request it be removed. This is the UCI rule: UCI CYCLING REGULATIONS TRACK RACES 3.2.005 Riders may carry no object on them or on their bicycles that could drop onto the track. They may not bear or ...


13

They're heavier, hotter (vents would do the opposite of what you're trying to do with an aero helmet, which is to route air up and over the helmet), and it's more difficult to turn your head (it doesn't completely prohibit turning your head but you lose the benefit of the shape as you turn it off-axis) so you have to depend on peripheral vision more. Plus, ...


12

A lot of mystique grows up around the regulation of many sports. The key (as Neo says) is to get to the source ... UCI regulations say Section 2: bicycles Preamble Bicycles shall comply with the spirit and principle of cycling as a sport. The spirit presupposes that cyclists will compete in competitions on an equal ...


12

All the helmets in the picture are aero helmets, just different styles. Helmet needs in sprint competitions are different than for individual timed events as the rider is more likely to turn their head around to assess the race situation as well as be in various positions on the bike (e.g. out of the saddle while accelerating) which means the interaction of ...


11

The rules for Track Races are here. In the Team Sprint: The leading rider shall lead the first lap and move towards the outside of the track and then drop back to leave the track without hindering the other team. In Great Britain's semi-final this is what happened at the end of the first lap: Jess Varnish (nearest to us in the picture) was the leading ...


10

The UK National Cycling Centre FAQ (PDF) says: Why do the riders go anti clockwise? The Chariots in Roman times raced this way round, and athletic races and most other sports have followed in the same direction. The Straight Dope says: How do these things get started? I've gotten several letters asking why races are "always" counterclockwise, ...


9

Regarding handlebar selection, aero bars are only allowed in the pursuit (individual and team) and time trial events (1km TT, etc). All the other track events are drop bars only. Wheel selection is a little more dependent on the rider's preference, though this is regulated as well; dual discs wheels are allowed for track time trials (essentially the same ...


8

Two very different animals. The TT frame is built up with road components, the brake handles and shifters are a bit different but the front/rear derailleurs, crank, etc are all regular road components. The track frame is a single speed frame and many do not have holes to mount brakes...for Planet X you'll have to ask if the fork does or does not have them.....


8

Some tips: Look at where you want to go (the exit of the turn) and not ahead or at your front wheel. Slightly turn your hips and waist to point to where you want to go (the exit of the turn). Also, thinking that you want to point your belly button there helps achieve this movement. Outside foot down (pressing the bike down), inside foot up. Outside hand ...


8

Velodromes are not a suitable cycling venue for members of the general public. They require specialized equipment (e.g., higher bottom brackets to avoid pedal strikes), training (e.g., no moving up/down track without ensuring you have room, maintaining enough speed in corners), and discipline. Expecting untrained riders and/or unsupervised novices to ride ...


7

The equation for total aerodynamic drag force on a bicycle is well-understood and, you're right, air density has a role in it: the higher the density, the greater the drag. As you guessed, density decreases with increasing temperature so warm air is less dense than cold air. It's also probably no surprise that density decreases with pressure. However, ...


7

The guy using it apparently is Hans-Henrik Oersted who was sponsered by chinelli. The company recently did a rerun of two jerseys to honor him. The picture can also be found on cinellis website about the jerseys so i wrote a request for information to their customer service. They answered it is a handmade trainer build especially for Hans-Henrik Oersted in ...


7

That 1/2" is a pitch, ie. distance between 2 pins, which is standard on all bikes, expect, maybe, some super vintage ones. Just forget about it and pay attention to width (1/8 or 3/32").


6

UCI Regulations for Track cycling provide a very loose definition for velodromes (see page 75) even up to the Olympic level. The only strict requirements beyond track width and markings are that velodromes must be 133-500m long (250m exactly for Olympic events), the track shape should consist of two parallel straights connected by two bends and that there is ...


6

For your purposes, the biggest difference is the rear dropout (where the rear axle connects). The track bike will be much easier to set up as a fixie. I suspect the pricing difference has to do with features like bottle bosses, attachment point for derailer, cable routing stuff, etc, not from the TT frame being "better" in any other way. The TT frame has a ...


6

Honestly, I don't think that a velodrome would accomplish what you are intending, taking the public from the streets to the track. Riding on the banks of a velodrome (Unless it's wide/long such as the 'drome at the end of Paris-Roubaix) is an accomplished skill, so what I'm afraid you'd have is a bunch of riders doing laps at the bottom of the track. Also, ...


5

It's as you suggest, a combination of a standard road cleat and straps as a 'belt and braces' approach. A quick google showed some packages of both sold together


5

Because it's not permitted under UCI regulations. Rule 1.3.018 applies, which includes this section: In track competition, including motor-pacing, the use of a front disc wheel is only permitted in the specialities against the clock. Disc wheels are commonly used in the sprint qualifying round (i.e. the flying 200 metre TT).


5

For the track taster session I did a while back, anything like a bike computer, GPS etc was expressly prohibited. I think because anything 'loose' shoved in a jersey pocket might fall out and cause a hazard for other riders.


4

Air density alone has a fairly substantial impact on speed, if all else is equal (and if my calculations are correct!) Based on the equation and from this page on cycling aerodynamics, and the air-density values from Wolfram Alpha, I came up with: At 300 watts, at 0*C, will travel at 39.34 km/h At 300 watts, at 10*C, will travel at 40.06 km/h At 300 watts,...


4

Hope this helps. The part of the international cycling union regulations about women's team sprint states that it is a race of 2 laps with 2 riders. Each rider must complete one lap each. The leading rider shall lead the first lap and move towards the outside of the track and the second rider shall complete the second lap on their own. A team ...


4

Yes. Have a look at UCI's MTB rules at http://www.uci.ch/mm/Document/News/Rulesandregulation/16/72/76/MTBReglementsENG_English.pdf Look for "course marking".


4

Short answer - noone knows for sure. This question is a more specific dupe of https://sports.stackexchange.com/questions/1000/are-all-oval-track-races-done-counter-clockwise-if-so-why I'd consider human physiology as the cause - somewhere between 70% and 95% of grown humans prefer their right-hand. And noone knows why either. Citations: http://www.bbc....


4

Track cyclists reach speeds over 50 km/h. At these speeds you need to cover your eyes and sunglasses look cooler than clear glasses. Because velodromes are usually well lit, they don't affect the cyclists sight.


4

According to the rule of thumb method of setting saddle height (knee slightly bent when pedal at the bottom of the stroke) the saddle should be set higher if the crank is shorter because the pedal is higher at the bottom of the stroke. Essentially, seat height is set relative to the lowest position of the pedal rather than relative to the bottom bracket. ...


3

At my local velodrome (Derby, UK) cycling anti clockwise the corners have a much steeper gradient coming out of the corner to provide a speed boost as come out. The top of the track is also about 1.5 meters higher at the corner apex than at the top on the straights. It sounds as if all tracks might vary though


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