17

Saddle height for new bike setup purposes should always be set relative to the pedal, not the BB center or any other reference point. So yes, crank length makes a difference. Using the ground or BB center as a reference point is convenient for re-establishing a given height after the post has been moved, but not for setting up one bike to have the same leg ...


14

In track (velodrome) racing, visible cycle computer displays are generally not permitted. So the only funny looks will be from the commissaire who will request it be removed. This is the UCI rule: UCI CYCLING REGULATIONS TRACK RACES 3.2.005 Riders may carry no object on them or on their bicycles that could drop onto the track. They may not bear or ...


14

Track cyclists are travelling in excess of 30mph. At that speed you need eyewear to protect from the 'wind'.


13

A lot of mystique grows up around the regulation of many sports. The key (as Neo says) is to get to the source ... UCI regulations say Section 2: bicycles Preamble Bicycles shall comply with the spirit and principle of cycling as a sport. The spirit presupposes that cyclists will compete in competitions on an equal ...


12

All the helmets in the picture are aero helmets, just different styles. Helmet needs in sprint competitions are different than for individual timed events as the rider is more likely to turn their head around to assess the race situation as well as be in various positions on the bike (e.g. out of the saddle while accelerating) which means the interaction of ...


10

The UK National Cycling Centre FAQ (PDF) says: Why do the riders go anti clockwise? The Chariots in Roman times raced this way round, and athletic races and most other sports have followed in the same direction. The Straight Dope says: How do these things get started? I've gotten several letters asking why races are "always" counterclockwise, ...


9

Regarding handlebar selection, aero bars are only allowed in the pursuit (individual and team) and time trial events (1km TT, etc). All the other track events are drop bars only. Wheel selection is a little more dependent on the rider's preference, though this is regulated as well; dual discs wheels are allowed for track time trials (essentially the same ...


8

Some tips: Look at where you want to go (the exit of the turn) and not ahead or at your front wheel. Slightly turn your hips and waist to point to where you want to go (the exit of the turn). Also, thinking that you want to point your belly button there helps achieve this movement. Outside foot down (pressing the bike down), inside foot up. Outside hand ...


7

That 1/2" is a pitch, ie. distance between 2 pins, which is standard on all bikes, expect, maybe, some super vintage ones. Just forget about it and pay attention to width (1/8 or 3/32").


7

The guy using it apparently is Hans-Henrik Oersted who was sponsered by chinelli. The company recently did a rerun of two jerseys to honor him. The picture can also be found on cinellis website about the jerseys so i wrote a request for information to their customer service. They answered it is a handmade trainer build especially for Hans-Henrik Oersted in ...


6

UCI Regulations for Track cycling provide a very loose definition for velodromes (see page 75) even up to the Olympic level. The only strict requirements beyond track width and markings are that velodromes must be 133-500m long (250m exactly for Olympic events), the track shape should consist of two parallel straights connected by two bends and that there is ...


6

Because it's not permitted under UCI regulations. Rule 1.3.018 applies, which includes this section: In track competition, including motor-pacing, the use of a front disc wheel is only permitted in the specialities against the clock. Disc wheels are commonly used in the sprint qualifying round (i.e. the flying 200 metre TT).


5

For the track taster session I did a while back, anything like a bike computer, GPS etc was expressly prohibited. I think because anything 'loose' shoved in a jersey pocket might fall out and cause a hazard for other riders.


5

Sprint often requires quick direction changes. With a quick turn of the wheel a disc becomes a rudder in the wind and can behave unexpectedly. Even in TT, many riders will elect something other than a disc in the front simply because it's a little more skittery. A disc in match sprint c/would be dangerous. UCI recognizes this.


5

It's as you suggest, a combination of a standard road cleat and straps as a 'belt and braces' approach. A quick google showed some packages of both sold together


5

According to the rule of thumb method of setting saddle height (knee slightly bent when pedal at the bottom of the stroke) the saddle should be set higher if the crank is shorter because the pedal is higher at the bottom of the stroke. Essentially, seat height is set relative to the lowest position of the pedal rather than relative to the bottom bracket. ...


4

Yes. Have a look at UCI's MTB rules at http://www.uci.ch/mm/Document/News/Rulesandregulation/16/72/76/MTBReglementsENG_English.pdf Look for "course marking".


4

Short answer - noone knows for sure. This question is a more specific dupe of https://sports.stackexchange.com/questions/1000/are-all-oval-track-races-done-counter-clockwise-if-so-why I'd consider human physiology as the cause - somewhere between 70% and 95% of grown humans prefer their right-hand. And noone knows why either. Citations: http://www.bbc....


4

Track cyclists reach speeds over 50 km/h. At these speeds you need to cover your eyes and sunglasses look cooler than clear glasses. Because velodromes are usually well lit, they don't affect the cyclists sight.


3

The measurement is the distance between inner plates of the chain. If your cogs are thicker than 3/32", you need 1/8" chain. Traditionally track bikes have used wide chain, but since the 2000s there have been cogs at both widths.


3

At my local velodrome (Derby, UK) cycling anti clockwise the corners have a much steeper gradient coming out of the corner to provide a speed boost as come out. The top of the track is also about 1.5 meters higher at the corner apex than at the top on the straights. It sounds as if all tracks might vary though


2

This an old thread with an accepted answer; the consensus is against the idea. So here is a dissenting view. In my city (Melbourne, Australia), there are seven velodromes that are open to the public. Access is always with personal responsibility. These open (to the public and to the sky) facilities see fairly constant use, and regular club use. Most of ...


2

Some good points above, but first of all you should ask the venue to check that you'd even be allowed on the track. Most velodromes have pretty draconian rules. Minimum BB height, maximum crank length, specific pedal requirements, restrictions on bottle cages, brake/rack/mudguard bosses... the list goes on. You'd almost certainly have to remove your brakes ...


2

The manufacturer has uploaded a video for the E114 stating that it is a triathlon bike. Argon18 Video on youtube.


2

Bottom brackets are incredibly confusing--there is a huge number of standards, and some of them refer to the diameter in the name, some the width, etc. The compatibility chart for your new crankset lists BSA as an option. BSA uses the same bottom-bracket threading as JIS--which we know is already working on your bike--so that is the correct BB to get. What ...


2

Although the question is almost 1 year old now I have a simple answer: no, it doesn't fit. How do I know? I have tried the exact same (Miche Pistard 2.0 crankset and the same Dura Ace BB). The axle of the crankset it too thick. I managed to get it in, but it was very very tight. When I tried to attach the left arm crank and started the tightening, I noticed ...


2

The product page you linked to is listing the crank in question as being compatible with Miche Evo Max bottom brackets, which in different types for different frame interfaces. It will probably also be fine with a Shimano road BB, most 24mm road and track cranks are, but that's not being called out as compatible here, so you're rolling the dice a little. ...


1

TLDR: Miche crank may not be compatible with Shimano external bearing BB. The Miche BB is compatible of course and will very likely fit your frame (but bearing quality unknown, and probably not as good as Dura Ace). If you are going to use the crank with the recommended Miche BB you need to know what frame BB shell width and thread size you have. Majority ...


1

You can run a fixed cog or a single-cog BMX-style freewheel easily on a track (pista) hub, but the wheel dish is way too far out on the drive side to fit a 5 or greater freewheel cassette. In other words there is simply just not enough room between the hub flange and the frame to support a wider cassette. Modern multi-speed hubs have the spoke flange set ...


1

Looking at the Argon 18 website it is almost certainly a triathlon bike. The other E series bikes are listed in the triathlon/time trial section, and their track bikes use a different naming scheme. The reviews I found also call it a triathlon bike. Then there are the brakes and derailers (and triathlon bars) mentioned by @ojs. Given the difference between ...


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