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19

In the US, you ride in the right lane as far right as you can unless you are "taking the lane," which is legal in some states under some conditions (e.g. no bike lane, debris on shoulder, not safe for car and bike to split a line - which in my opinion is never safe). By signaling with your left hand, your hand is going to be more in the line of ...


14

Why are cyclists in the US expected (or required) to signal "Stop" with the palm of their left hand? Consistency. All vehicles on the road are expected/required to use the same signals - for the most part, the same laws apply to all vehicles on the road. For example (from https://www.caranddriver.com/features/a26789192/hand-driving-signals/): ...


11

A historic reason why signaling is with the left hand in the US is because motor vehicle drivers sit on the left side of the vehicle in the US and must signal with the left hand out their left window if their signal lights are broken (or when driving before turn signals existed). If they signaled with their right hand, it would be inside the car and wouldn'...


6

Although the front brake is indeed more effective, you generally don't need full braking power while stopping or slowing in traffic. It's also rare in my experience to see lone cyclists signaling for stops. In group riding though, it's more common since you don't want to get rear-ended by the rider drafting you. Personally, I downshift and brake after I ...


5

The brake operated by my left hand. Ah yes, pet peeve of mine. That's a very poorly-considered default configuration that you can easily fix. I switch cables around so that I can brake the front wheel with my right hand while signaling. This is sometimes useful when going down a fairly steep hill and making a turn. Not only that, but also because I'm right ...


4

I will try to elaborate on what I wrote originally below to avoid it being isolated to a one off incident/urban myth or anecdote. What I wrote below is not unique to me as other experienced riders have similar stories that follow a similar narrative (i.e. I'll skip the helmet and then they have a crash where a helmet could have helped mitigate injuries). For ...


4

I do this regularly biking in the US. Taking the lane at an intersection reduces many dangers at intersections. If there was a car in the lane that was going straight the cars behind would also not be able to turn right on red. At the light, you are moving at exactly the same speed as a stopped car going straight and so there is really no reason for you to ...


3

As far as brake power is concerned, it's not really relevant whether the remaining hand operates the rear or front brake – with just one hand, you're limited by the fact that you need to brace your upper body one-handed against the handlebar without turning it. For a right-handed person, having the right hand on the handlebar should even allow for slightly ...


2

Here in Austria (and everywhere else in Europe) I’ve never heard of any requirement/recommendation to signal braking with your left hand. When I want to stop on a straight road I signal with my right hand because I’m going to the right onto the shoulder of the road, just like you’d do in a car. Some rear lights have a brake light function. They increase ...


2

Currently the following states in the USA have stop as yield laws for bicycles: Idaho, Delaware, Colorado (opt in), Arkansas, Oregon, Washington. The following states have legislation proposed in 2021: Virginia, New York, Colorado (making it statewide standard), California, Utah, Colorado(?) The law sunsets in Delaware this year, but may be extended. ...


2

I stand up and move my weight back so as to unweigh the front wheel. After it has crossed, I move my weight forward and the back wheel does whatever. This helps with acute angle crossing, wet conditions, the tire catching inside the rail grove. This of course for rails that protrude at most 10cm above the road, not this


1

Not strictly equivalent, but a different answer to the same observation: in France, Belgium and Netherlands (possibly other European countries), a special sign can be added to traffic lights to allow cyclists to (safely) ignore the red light (see below). Typically, to turn right or to go straight on T-junctions on the lane without crossing. In the idea of a ...


1

I'd say: Stick to it. You take a lane when cars need to wait for you, you take the same lane when you need to wait for cars. Get the message across that yes, you are a vehicle. Yes, you have rights. And yes, you stick to the rules. Personally, I hate the fact that everytime that I talk to a car driver, the very first reaction is: "You guys don't stick ...


1

I fully support the notion for cyclist to take a lane when no shoulder or bike path is available and there are studies that support it is safer for cyclists and better for the flow of traffic in doing that - https://cyclingsavvy.org/road-cycling/ As for splitting lanes, it boils down to is it legal for bikes/motos to split lanes in your location or not as ...


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