Hot answers tagged

14

Yes, its tyre rubber. People typically use either old/worn, cheap hard compound or dedicated turbo tyres for this reason with wheel on style trainers. The bad news is that more typically sprays off backwards than down on the mat where you see it, so there's a good chance the rest of your room has a light coating of rubber particles too!


12

I know this is an old question, but I think I have come up with a nice solution to this problem. I am an engineer and I have dealt with some vibration issues in scientific equipment. When I got my trainer and felt the vibration in the floor, I decided to apply the same principles to this problem. Vibration vs. Acoustic Transmission The first thing to ...


12

Totally fine - its a good idea. You'll need to move the sensor and fit a second spoke magnet (or move your front wheel one) Another option would be fit an ant+ or bluetooth sensor and look at virtual ride tools like zwift, but they're not free. Another option is count your pedal strokes and aim for 90 every minute, but that gets boring.


10

No. For fixed trainer, it should be obvious. For rollers, rolling resistance is higher on rollers than on flat surface. Wheels don't also have much momentum, so you can slow down by freewheeling for a few seconds. The only use for brakes is preparing to dropping off the rollers: rotating tires leave a nasty skid mark on the floor but brakes stop the wheel ...


10

If you want to improve balance and control out of the saddle at any speed, even freewheeling, you just have to practice doing it. Note that balance while pedaling out of the saddle on a trainer vs. on the road will be very different as the bike is held firmly upright in the trainer With respect to power output: pedaling out of the saddle is usually done ...


9

Road tires are not designed to be used on a trainer and they will wear more rapidly than when used on the road. Optimize your rig Use a tire designed for trainers to reduce wear Here are some tips from "Coach Levi" on setting up rollers - the information should help in your setup. Stationary trainers are known for eating away at rear tires ...


8

I can play like this for an hour or so Get a multi elevation desk (Like this one around $35 from Amazon) it allows you to lower and tilt the TV UP toward you reducing neck strain adding cheap armrest bars/aerobars (like these around $20 from Amazon) allows you to rest your elbows comfortably while riding the bike, keeping your weight forward. Adding a heart ...


8

Yes you can, although my suggestion is buying another cycle computer rather than trying to re-fit an existing cycle computer as you appear to be asking for. I've always used a cadence cycle computer. The Cateye Strada wired cycle computer connects to the crank arm and the rear wheel. Then you have cadence as well as speed and you can put the computer back ...


8

Can I do minimum upgrade to get my bike to fit 11 speed cassette? Nope. You'd need derailleurs, crank set, shifters, cassette and chain at least. Given that groupsets bought as separate components cost a lot more than they do as part of a complete bike, I almost always recommend buying a whole new bike to make this upgrade. Can I downgrade my trainer ...


8

The standard hub width for road wheels with QR is 130mm for non disc and 135mm for disc hubs. Even though you can force the frame to clamp around narrower hub, it is strongly recommended to add spacers to the axle to adjust the width. As mentioned in comments, if you have hydraulic brake it's best to insert a spacer between brake pads so that you do not ...


7

The guy using it apparently is Hans-Henrik Oersted who was sponsered by chinelli. The company recently did a rerun of two jerseys to honor him. The picture can also be found on cinellis website about the jerseys so i wrote a request for information to their customer service. They answered it is a handmade trainer build especially for Hans-Henrik Oersted in ...


7

Buy a recumbent exercise bike instead and you'll be much more able to play games. But if you're training for serious upright riding rather than general fitness that will not be what you want. I have used one of these for a while and used to read while riding it. That worked fine, but once my broken collarbone healed I lost interest (but I live in Sydney ...


7

64 watts is well within the margin of error of 60w target. Don't be afraid of going to your lowest gear on the trainer. You should be working up to your target cadence, if you can't hold 90 without bouncing then you should aim for something lower. It will take time to get up there. 60w is relatively low for most people, it may become easier for you to ...


7

Yes, it is a real Kinetic. The older Kinetics used to be black and had a much different logo. "But for some time now, I’ve been wondering how much different the Kurt Kinetic Road Machine is from my ‘old’ trainer. Well, it turns out that Kurt Kinetic hit on a winner with the original design… and except for a new ‘hair color’, the two units are nearly ...


7

The main difference is cost, both money and space. If you already own a bicycle then it is using up space whether you can ride it or not. If you want to use the existing bike on a trainer then that may end up cheaper overall. And you can still unhook the trainer and go ride normally, giving you dual-service. By comparison, a stationary bike is a fixed item ...


7

The short answer is: with power data alone? No. With power and speed data? Yes, sometimes. The longer answer is an explanation of the conditions under which one can sometimes tell. First, here is Fig. 2 from Martin et al. "Modeling sprint cycling with field-derived parameters and forward integration" with the transition from standing to sitting ...


6

Let's start with some quick maths. I'm guessing the roller has a diameter of 40mm based on the picture. Since it's in contact with the tyre, whatever speed your speedo reads is how fast that roller is going. But it's 40mm in diameter. So, at 72kph / 45mph we have: Speed = 72kph = 20m/s Diameter = 40mm = 0.04m Circumference = π d = 0.125m Revs per second = ...


6

This is not an answer to your question but rather an update. Racermate has announced a recall for all "blue" flywheels, and they are replacing them. Here is the announcement and a form to get the replacement: http://www.racermateinc.com/blue-flywheel-recall/


6

The only reason a worn rim is dangerous on the road is that you would fall of were it to fail. On a trainer your weight is held by the axle, not the rim, so a rim failure would be nothing more than a minor annoyance.


6

I don't see why not, unless you plan on braking while on the trainer? Theoretically you could still have a rim failure because the wheel/tire pushes against the resistance wheel. However, this is a constant tension, not sudden impacts. If a spoke were to become loose though, the rim could fail and the wheel could implode, but since your on a trainer it's not ...


6

Thanks to @R.Chung I was able to do some research and figure out what my problem might be. This article, Climbing vs time-trialling: same effort, different power output, explains in great detail the differences in inertial load. To sum it up in relation to my problem: When on the road where the elevation changes often I use slow twitch muscles and exert ...


6

Short answer: Yes. Not so short answer: It depends, since most bike computer sensors (The Reed switch / Hall sensor) are designed for a front fork - spoke clearance and usually this is smaller when compared with the chain/seat stays. I have done it when testing the maximum potential speed my gearing could achieve and had to add a rubber to act as an spacer, ...


6

Whilst it is true that there are some differences in muscle recruitment between pedalling uphill and on the flat, the main difficulty hills present is an increased power output for a sustained period of time (unless you have a tiny gear of course). However the main factor it comes down to is fitness - pure power/weight ratio - 200W is still 200W whether its ...


6

I wouldn't hesitate using a tyre in that condition on the trainer, in fact that's exactly the sort of condition i might expect to start using a tyre on the trainer. The small cracks likely mean the rubber is deteriorating and may be less grippy, but that's of little worry. It's very unlikely there is substantial damage to the actual carcass of the tyre. ...


6

There is a problem here in that there is currently no sensor on the market (that i'm aware of) to measure sitting/standing. And unless i'm misunderstanding ML, we would need that input into our data for it to learn how this correlates to the cyclists power/cadence etc. However, i'll ignore that and look at a couple of options that might give promising ...


5

Just buy an inexpensive metal seat post, and if eventually it wears out it wears out. That seems to be your least expensive option. Especially if it's just a trainer bike. Just lube it up with either a little bit of oil or odorless teflon grease.


5

How about aerobars without the bars? You just need the tv set on floor slightly tilted so you don't break your neck. For example Zipp Alumina Clip has several possible setups for comfortable "riding" position. You can ride in sitting position every now and then to stretch your hip and back. Remember to keep your back straight and shoulders down. :)


5

Check out the videos on the Kurt Kinetic Rock and Roll you can definitely stand and tilt the bike side to side. Whether it would handle Andre Greipel in a full out sprint I couldn't say. It's probably one of the better options to look into.


5

The Lemond manual might answer this question with an odd footnote on page 19, which states "11-speed components will fit, but may not allow full use of the cassette." Assuming you own the same model, that is. http://www.lemondfitness.com/files/fetch/revolution/300223-RevolutionOM-RevB.pdf"


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