15

You've got off to a great start, well done. Several answers tell you how to improve quickly, and they're not wrong. But you'll see plenty of improvement just by riding often, occasionally pushing yourself, and resting when you feel the need after a hard effort. Riding daily to work/school/college if reasonable, with something for fun some weekends is hugely ...


13

I think you should always check with a doctor if you have concerns about your health. While you probably can get advice on your health from this forum, this is not the best place to seek specific medical advice that is going to be right for you. With that said provided you have no issues that can stop you from training here is what worked for me and others ...


10

It never gets easier, you just go faster. — Greg Lemond It actually sounds like you are doing great, that 30km ride was 50% longer than your previous largest ride which is pretty significant. Just sticking with it is a big part of the equation here but, there are lots of training plans out there like https://www.cyclingweekly.com/fitness/training/cycling-...


8

Get a tandem. Wherever your relationship is going, it'll get there faster, and together, on a tandem.


7

In flat terrain it’s easy: Just ask her to ride in your slipstream. When done properly this allows a much weaker rider to keep up with a stronger rider. However you both have to pay attention at all times. Signal direction changes (turns, overtaking etc.), signal potholes, don’t brake suddenly, increase the distance if necessary and so on. Weight will hardly ...


7

You can basically use any trainer with a powermeter (I would call it a "smart trainer" but others do protest too much). The cheapest ones start at 200€, better ones, with a more accurate power meter, say 300€. There is no need to have a powermeter on your bike. These trainers are not that much more expensive than the copletely dumb ones. You are ...


7

It's impossible for us to give an answer to you here, since shortness of breath can be due to simple lack of fitness, undiagnosed obstructive airway disease or even undiagnosed cardiovascular disease. It is common that people are recommended to check with their doctor before beginning an exercise program, although this advice is usually for (older) adults ...


7

Cycling Weekly has lots of great articles. This may sound strange, but make full blast sprinting a part of your training. Usually a person gets tired because they don’t have enough oxygen moving into their legs. Sprinting works the great muscles of your upper legs. It doesn’t have to be a 1k sprint or anything like that. Just go flat out for a couple hundred ...


6

Fundamentally, you will see improvement by gradually increasing either the time or intensity of your riding. Ideally, you should focus more on the time and intensity (perceived effort) of your rides and less on speed/distance. This is for two reasons; firstly, route choice and weather can make a big difference to your speed. Secondly, when you worry about ...


6

For any somewhat fit rider, the limiting factor will not be their muscles. The limiting factor for biking is oxygen transport to the muscles. Your heart plays a role, your blood plays a role, and your lungs play a role. The more efficient your cardiovascular system is able to get the oxygen to your muscles, the faster the speed that you can maintain. That ...


5

Occam's razor says "practice riding slower" for her benefit. No extra hardware spend required. Instead its extra cognitive load for you as a rider. Downside is that if you do keep riding away from her, she might not want to come with you any more. The hard part here is that you're looking for a technical solution to a mental/tactical problem. ...


5

For the bike, don’t worry about it as long as it at your size and properly adjusted, if you do mostly roads and parks. The most important is to enjoy doing it. You mentioned riding with friends, then it might better to have a bike of a similar kind than your friends (road, gravel, MTB), but it's not a requirement. The answer depends also on what you’d like ...


4

I'll answer in a very general sense. For virtual cycling, the program or app needs to know how fast you are going. This is a function of what power you are producing. The simplest solution is to have some sort of power meter on the bike or on the trainer. These typically sense the torque you generate (i.e. how much you twist some part of the bike, e.g. the ...


4

This is really hard to assess just from the description and we cannot really give a health advise. It is common to get out of breath when going full gas but one should also get the muscles tired. What comes in which degree depends on many factors but they usually go hand in hand. BTW, it often happens to me that my nose is quite closed and I can mostly only ...


4

Rather than you riding slower, help her to ride faster. Make sure her bike is in top condition with good quality parts - no MTB tyres on her bike. If that's not enough to even the playing field, then consider an ebike for her. You'll have difficulty keeping up with most of them on full assist, so there's your workout. And she'll be able to enjoy the ride ...


4

The other answer is functional, but buying tools to check threads is going way beyond what someone needs who just wants to put training wheels on a bike. Assuming you are in a North American country, head out to the nearest hardware store (Ace, True Value, etc.) or home improvement store (Lowes, Home Depot, etc.) and bring the training wheels with you. Its ...


4

You could increase rolling resistance by lowering the air pressure in your tires. With lower pressure, the tire walls will deform more as they roll, dissipating more energy and making riding more difficult. This will add resistance to a point, but don't underinflate too much, or you'll run a greater risk of punctures or rim damage. You could also add wind ...


3

I've never tried one, but you can get a special hub designed with this in mind. It can provide a fixed resistance or use feedback from your heart rate monitor or power meter to keep resistance at a specified level. https://airhub.com.au


3

While stationary trainers are used primarily to train for raw strength and power, rollers provide training for form and balance. Because the bike is free to move and weave on the rollers, the rider must keep the bicycle centered while riding. You can't just space out like you can on a regular trainer. Imbalance between right and left legs will often cause ...


3

Don't know what the weather is currently like for you, but where I live, it is currently about freezing temp when I go out cycling and running. All the answers above are good points and I had the same question you had a few months ago when it started getting cold. "Why can't I breath?" I then checked out Cold-induced asthma, an irritation of your ...


3

It's hard to say whether you specifically are encountering something abnormal and/or dangerous, but what you describe sounds pretty normal. I just glanced at the results of a quick search on chronic sinusitis, but it sounds like it mainly affects just your nose. So maybe it makes breathing through your nose harder, but not being able to breath mostly through ...


3

First, don’t worry about being fit before getting a better bike, if you can afford one. Once you have a better bike you’ll wonder how you got along without it before. Second, as far as your distance concern goes, don’t stress about it. Push yourself hard, but don’t overdo it and be sure to allow your body to recover between rides. The less conditioned you ...


2

Given your last paragraph where you describe your objectives, do you need a power meter at all? Do you want to know if your performance is improving? If you leave the trainer on a fixed resistance, you can quantify your performance by measuring distance. If the trainer or your bike doesn't already have this capability, there are very inexpensive bike ...


2

In brief, you need to identify the major diameter and the thread pitch. That should be sufficient. Secondary considerations like the thread's form, its minor diameter, are less important. This also assumes the existing thread is not damaged. You will need a vernier caliper - a ruler is not accurate enough, though a cheap plastic vernier may work. You ...


1

It looks like there are a number of trainers that Elite sold under the Muin name, so be very sure you're getting one that's "smart." Also, that's not a current model—it was first introduced in 2014, which is a long time in the industry. Trainers communicate with apps according to a standard so compatibility generally isn't an issue, but if this is ...


1

Congrats for getting on the bike. Consider that virtual riding is expensive, and you might be perfectly happy with a pen and paper to record your distance and time. Most of the exercycles have some form of readout of which you can take notes. If you have a resistance trainer for your bike, then a cheap cycle computer might be sufficient, by fitting the ...


1

You also may just be especially fit. For example, Dale Stone, one of my favorite MTB YouTubers, has a max heart rate of 208 or so, and is still capable of talking at 180BPM and higher. Heart rate guidelines are just that: guidelines, and there's no guarantee that you fall within them.


1

I take it you know or feel what your optimal cadence is. If not, somewhere between 70-90 rpm usually is a good starting point to experiment with. Find a gear in the back while on the big chain ring that you can peddle at between 70-90 rpm and that you see your heart rate stay flat for the duration of your ride. Again a good starting point for a new rider is ...


1

On a Desktop, I would highly suggest gpx.studio https://gpxstudio.github.io/ if you ever need to edit your Strava maps. On my first 3mi run, I had a problem with my GPS and was easily able to correct and input an honest time/pace ( before I edited it, it said I had a 3min mi pace... not even close to what I really did. I then changed it up to a little under ...


1

Well, having respect for what can happen is a good thing! It's what keeps you alive. That said, there are two things you need to consider: Tire crawl: There are bicycle tires that are just squirmy. When you lean a bit into a corner, the inner flank collapses somewhat while the turning tire is loaded, causing the bike to move in a direction that does not ...


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