20

"Ghost ride": Borrow a good bike (if needed). Ride on the good bike, while pulling the incomplete one alongside you by holding its stem. Your secondary hand sits on the second bike's stem and pulls it along as you ride slowly. It may sound silly, but I had to do it once and I was impressed with how well it worked. One way to look at it: it's not ...


16

This is how I did it once: Needed three straps. Two of them where used to improvise shoulder straps so I carried the bike simulating a backpack. The third strap was to stabilize the handlebar so it and the fork where fixed in one position and not swinging uncontrollably. If I were to do it again, I'd prepare myself to remove pedals and carry a thick blanket ...


15

Some possibilities: Some searching suggests there's at least one bike shop in Leh. You could call ahead and get them to save a suitable bike box for you. You could scrounge some suitably big pieces of cardboard once there and either buy or bring some packing tape. Properly reinforced, boxes "made" this way are totally fine for shipping bikes in. Finally, ...


12

After growing somewhat impatient, I grew a pair, set the fork (protected by the guard) on the ground, set my foot on the protector, and pulled up on the legs as hard as I could. It came off, but as a cautionary note to anyone else with this problem, I took a brake to the shin. Watch your shins


11

If you have only the one bike, and no other transport, then you're going to be walking. If the bike has working wheels then it can roll and all you do is hold it by the stem while walking. Mind out for the pedal nearest you, it tends to clip you in the ankle. Some people do this with one hand on the saddle, controlling direction in the same way as riding ...


10

This is quite tricky, given a trombone is not a nicely shaped instrument. You can try some larger racks, or mount some plywood or something to a smaller rack to try to get a more stable surface to carry the trombone (or be able to build something that allowed carrying the trombone like a pannier), but I doubt it will be very good, especially with all the ...


10

I'd be very tempted to make a tool roll. You'll need access to a sewing machine that can handle 2-3 layers of canvas, but even most home machines will do that if you're careful (and buy a canvas needle!) You see them mostly today with sets of ring spanners, made of cheap plastic. But in the older days people would generally make them out of canvas, often ...


10

It might be a facetious answer on the face, but seriously - why are you carrying your bike at all? Do carry a working mini-tube, pump, two tyre levers and whatever you need to get the wheel completely off if its not a QR (ring spanner, perhaps allen key, maybe special tool for IGHs etc) Some people like disposable gloves for the hand protection. Replace ...


9

If it sticks out from the width of the car DO NOT carry the bike in the bumper carrier. If necessary, take both wheels out but take no chances, anything wider than the car is a danger to yourself and others, think about motorbikes.


9

I'd suggest using a bike box (there are reusable ones sold and cardboard ones similar to the type of cardboard box that a new bike comes in). A bike shop should be willing to part with a box that a bike they're selling came in (and maybe pack it themselves) for some small fee. This video shows how to pack a bike in a cardboard bike box: ...


8

First, I'll give you an estimate on the weight of a cardboard box. Then, you can read the side notes at the end of this answer to see why the weight is a relatively irrelevant quantity. EDIT: This link sells a bike box and lists the weight as 7.40 lbs. The rest of this answer gives you a way to estimate this, as well as tells you why this whole problem is ...


8

Being both a hatchback owner and a trunk rack owner, I can tell you yes...and no. I've got a Saris Bones 3 rack and the feet have etched the window slightly. While the feet are of a more rubbery plastic, I think it's when there's dirt and grit underneath and moves (even unnoticeable movement) it grinds at the window. It usually cleans up pretty well, but I ...


8

Use a Gig Bag that you can use as a backpack. Thats what they are there for, and it seems there exist some for trombone with enough extra space for stands and sheets (check before you buy). I use a baritone saxophone gig bag on my bike (an older version of this one). While it may look a bit oddly proportioned on me (115cm in height; the bag, not me), it ...


8

I don't think there will be a clear roof vs. trunk recommendation as both systems have their pros and cons: Roof Pro Does not cover the trunk lid (access to the trunk when fully loaded) Bikes stay cleaner (Especially when raining - on the trunk, the rear of the car sucks up road grim which gets into the bikes moving parts) Con You have to lift the bikes ...


7

Yes, yes it is possible... If the tandem is loaded onto the carrier at an angle, it won't extend much beyond the width of the car or minivan (maybe not at all for a larger vehicle). It's not totally clear in the following picture, but the horizontal bars are tilted up a bit to make it more secure. It's necessary to bungee-cord the bike or otherwise secure ...


7

No, no, no. Just no. Two kilometers is only a half-hour walk. That's hardly a big deal. Why risk injuring or even killing yourself to save what can't be more than 15 minutes by the time you've called your friend and they've come to get you. Alternatively, fixing a puncture "in the wild" just needs a spare inner tube, tyre levers and a pump. That takes up ...


7

Would not recommend I have tried this - and it works well up to where it all went badly wrong. So I had an old front wheel hollow axle with a QR skewer through it. There were two locknuts and two old cone nuts set at a distance of about 100mm, duplicating the OLD of a front wheel. Sorry no photos available. This axle had been clamped onto a rear ...


7

You are correct that bike wheels are the dealbreaker—even if you could get the frame down to carry-on size, you won't get the wheels that small (although people have tried making collapsible bike wheels too). There are full-sized bikes made with couplers, which can be taken apart and packed in a case with the same footprint as the wheels, and there are a few ...


6

A bike box measuring 51.5"x7.5”x32" weighs 7.3 pounds As weighed on digital platform scale with accuracy to 0.05 pounds


6

The yoke spacing on the BOB Trailer is quite a bit wider then a typical front fork mount bike rack, you could probably modify one with wider spacers and use a trailer skewer (or similar fabricated part) to mount the trailer yoke. The wheel tray will need to be long enough for the span of the trailer and the fork mount will need to be high enough (or the ...


6

I can't imagine a backpack being a good place for tools in the long run. The lack of structure would drive me bonkers- it'd be so easy to keep losing those little bits in all the cloth folds and seams. If you wanted to go this route, I'd look into bags aimed at photographers since they come with lots of little, structured pockets. This is probably the most ...


6

There are a number of options, and this partly depends on how thorough a kit you need to carry with you. (i.e everything for every job, or a typical mechanic's pit kit) The best traveling tool kit I've found is made by B&W International. Their Bike Buddy case is sold either with or without tools included, and is a carry-on friendly, rolling hard case, ...


6

If you travel regularly, buy a decent, high quality hard shell or accept your bike will be damaged. Even with the very best case, your bike could be damaged - either accept it as a cost of travel, or purchase travel insurance that covers the bike. Depending on your travel and carriers, you will probably find a home made case will offer poorer protection ...


6

With other items sliding around I'd suggest a case where you don't need to take the bike fully apart to pack it. I think there are some you can just take the front wheel off of and pack it. If you can't do something like that you could use bungie cords to secure it and go to the hardware store and get some foam padding to put around the frame and drivetrain. ...


5

For packing, a box from a bike shop will do fine and you can chuck it in the recycling when you get to Tokyo and find another before flying out. Most bike shops will give these to you if you ask nicely and even if they charge you, it ain't going to be much. A much bigger issue is airline choice. Options for flying with a bike range from free to pay by the ...


5

What?? No! Hardcase, hardcase, hardcase!!! Your bike is not going to fare well going most of half way around the world in nothing more than a plastic bag. Please believe me. Don't ruin your tour. Some shops rent hard cases. Call around and see what you can find. Ask your friends. Ask local clubs. Look for a new or used one, buy it, and sell it when you'...


5

I recommend removing the disc rotors when you travel with a bike regardless of the packaging method. I have a hard sided case and have done the cardboard box thing (my fat bike does not fit in my hard sided case). Hard sided cases rely on compression to keep everything in place; compression against the flat side of a rotor is not a good thing. Remove the ...


5

Flying with a Brompton [as a carryon] is typically dependent on the airport staff and flight crew, rather than airline policies and procedures. I've had success getting the bike on larger planes no problem, mostly because overhead compartments were very large, or because there was sufficient space to store the folded bike (with seat and pedals removed) with ...


5

There are several companies that make covers for trailer hitched bikes. It's essentially a giant bag that's designed to cinch down over your bikes and rack. For a long trip like you are suggesting, it's probably well worth getting one. I have seen bikes after such road trips on a rear rack coated in horrible, horrible road slime.


5

Tires on planes are a problem because they are pressurized above sea level atmospheric pressure. The pressure on a commercial airliner drops below that at sea level, so the pressure difference increases which can exceed the pressure the tire can handle. Hydraulic brake fluid is not pressurized above sea level atmospheric pressure and the brake system is ...


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