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11

The Crossrip line isn't quite a cyclocross bike; its designed somewhere between a commuter bike and a cyclocross bike (more relaxed and heavier than most cyclocross bikes; also, rack+fender mounts). FWIW, I do know people who have used the Crossrip for light touring and a day to day basis and were happy. But if you'll be happy is a highly personal decision. ...


8

No, Trek will not sell you just the frame if they don't offer it in their product lineup. And a bike shop wouldn't either, given that they have to buy the whole bike anyway. It's just a massive headache to allow things like that for manufacturers. And many manufacturers generally aren't all too keen on letting people sell their bikes online (accessories are ...


6

I have used a Surly Cross Check for touring and it worked fine, for short tours (2 nights) with just rear panniers up to 3 weeks with front and rear panniers, mostly on dirt roads and some rough trails. While it is ostensibly a cyclocross bike, it does have a bunch of features suited to touring compared to a more modern high performance cx bike (e.g. steel ...


6

Possibly the bike has a cassette size that the Dura-Ace Di2 rear derailleur does not support. The current DA RD-R9150 (short cage) rear derailleur has a max low sprocket size of 30 teeth whereas the Ultegra RD-R8050-GS (medium cage) will take up to a 34. If you have an 11-32 or 11-34 cassette, you do in fact need the Ultegra GS derailleur. SS and SG ...


5

Many things on bicycles are consumable and anything that moves or rubs is going to have to be replaced, it's just a matter of when. It's unusual for a cassette to wear out completely within a year although if it's been ridden on a stretched chain or without regular cleaning and lubing it'll wear out much faster. In my experience chains are normally the ...


5

It is ok to have different width of tires on front and rear wheels, I have a thinner tire on rear wheel as the clearance is low and I wanted to fit a full fender. Why would someone have different wheels? - It is quite uncommon for new bikes to have different width of tires but used bikes can(as your's is). Perhaps, if the wheel was damaged/stolen the ...


5

You don't have to spend $2K on a bike that will be faster, lighter, easier to ride and generally better than your 25 year old bike. (I'm assuming the US here as you used mentioned dollars). That said, if the old bike only needs minimal maintenance that will not be expensive to do so, get it into a satisfactory condition and ride it for a few months. If you ...


5

Just keep riding what you have, especially if it fits. Getting out to ride is the most important thing, a new bike won’t change that. As you ride more and determine the type of riding you enjoy most, then you will have a better idea of your exact needs and can decide if a new bike makes sense So at this point, since I haven't found any super compelling ...


5

The liquid in the top photo is hydraulic fluid. You probably unscrewed the bleed port screw at some point and now your system has less fluid than it needs and also air. Seek a tutorial using your preferred search engine "bleed tektro brakes" on how to bleed your brakes and follow it. When you have done that you need to check two more things. There's ...


4

Assuming that you own the 2012 model, your bottom bracket should be a Shimano M171, according to the Trek Archives. Found a Shimano Technical document that says you should have a 68mm thread width.


4

Crank arm looks like it is actually fully on the tapered part of the axle. Square taper cranks don't mate up to the frame bottom bracket shell, there's supposed to be a gap there. See: Sheldon Brown's page on square taper cranks/bottom brackets. The gap does look a bit large to me though. Are you replacing crank arms? (Crank arm in pic looks new.) Is there ...


4

Shimano prides itself on seamless shifting and it's specs are quite conservative to preserve that reputation. With a little sensible caution and a chain catcher you should be able to replace the 26 with a 22. 22/36 is a big drop. If you are just going to replace a single chainring, I'd suggest a 24 rather than 22. When cogs are that small, even 2 teeth is a ...


3

Here's the Shimano datasheet. So we know it's a square taper, ISO-threaded BB. So a UN54/UN55 is the replacement part (take the UN55). 73 is the shell size: 73mm. 113 is the spindle length: 113mm.


3

http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/support/faq/question/what_are_the_differences_between_all_the_materials_you_use_in_your_frames/ This link might be helpful. It describes only two grades of alloy for their current bikes. The higher grade being hydroformed. Hydroforming allows profiling and shaping of the tubes. Its comparative to blow moulding. With respect ...


3

It sounds like they compare very directly with other manufacturers who list the alloy and butting, except that Trek doesn't release that. My guess is that some of those descriptions actually overlap and are just marketing hype that changes every couple of years. Your best bet would probably be to contact Trek directly and and see if they will "translate" ...


3

Mino is a link that changes the geometry of the bike. High lifts the BB (about 10mm) and steepens the head tube (1/2 degree) compared to low. With the link set low the bike will be more stable but less agile, especially on down hills. With it high it will be more agile but less stable, with lower chance of pedal strike (due BB height). The difference is ...


3

As mentioned in comments specific product recommendations are off topic here. (See What topics can I ask about here?). Answering the question about suitability of the bikes you link to for the commuting you want to do: A mountain bike at this price point would not be a good choice for commuting on paved roads or paths. The forks are low-end and basically ...


3

You need to know the type and axle length of your previous bottom bracket. If the BB is original, it is very likely BSA JIS square taper and needs to replaced with JIS square taper of similar length. You can either measure the length or just uninstall the old one and read what is printed on it. BSA bottom brackets have left handed threads on drive side. Just ...


3

On a bike of `89 vintage you will have a threaded bottom bracket shell and the bottom bracket bearings will be of the internal cartridge type - a unit containing the bearing and axle that threads into the frame and is secured with a lock ring, cranks attach to the axle on square tapers. Cartridge BB bearings are available in different axle lengths to ...


3

The trek archive is a bit light on B.B. detail but mentions an FSA Vero crankset. Googling FSA Vero shows me images of a square taper which is pretty straightforward and means that the bottom bracket is going to be threaded. Most likely it is 68mm across the B.B. shell, which you should measure. If it’s 68mm and you’re getting Shimano 105 cranks, just ...


3

This is not normal. Modern bikes should not throw the chain off the rings, either off the outside, inside or between the rings when changing gear. The front derailleur is probably set up wrong. Don’t let the bike store staff tell you it’s normal. You have a choice here so just buy a bike that works right from the beginning. It's true that you don't want ...


3

That bike is a good find. The double-butted frames are more desirable than the TIG welded later models. It's unclear to me exactly why other than a general assumption of it being a higher quality frame. As mentioned in the comments, something must be done to inhibit the continued oxidation of the cro-moly steel frame. Generally, two things must be ...


3

Referencing Shimano's 2016 archive specs docs: https://productinfo.shimano.com/download/?path=pdfs/archive/2015-2016_Specifications_v024_en.pdf From the specs it's possible to work out the exact crank and derailleurs you must have: Deore FC-M610 crank, Deore RD-M610 SGS rear derailleur, Alivio M4000 front derailleur. The RD-M610 SGS has a total capacity of ...


2

Wheels don't need to match and neither do tires, unless you're really picky about that sort of thing. Sometimes the wheel is damaged (out of true, bent, cracked, etc) and needs to be replaced. Other times it's changed to meet a specific need such as wanting a rim that supports a wider tire or a stronger rim if you're riding over tougher terrain. Personally, ...


2

The trek FX 7.1 is more of a hybrid/road bike than your supercycle. When you use it on roads your ride should be a lot faster and easier than on your old bike. However, your new bike will have the issues you describe: It is less comfortable on bumpy roads. You can't just race it onto a curb or over similar steep ridges without a good chance of bursting a ...


2

I ride a Trek FX 7.3 and weigh over 400 pounds. The only time I've gotten a mysterious flat (no nail or glass in the tire) was when I had ridden over 80 miles in about 7 hours. I didn't realize the pressure was going down due to the heat and cooling (random rainstorms) and got a pinch flat. As long as you keep your tires pumped to the max and you aren't ...


2

Being too heavy and getting too many flats may be separate issues... On one hand, weight will always seem to increase the rate of flats, as I have discovered by going cross country with 60 pounds strapped to my rear rack. On the other hand, as long as you are not popping spokes, you are not "too heavy" for your bike. To phrase this another way, this is not ...


2

Chain wear is objectively measured. Ask the shop to show you the chain wear measurement. It's a simple device that shows how much the chain has stretched. But if the chain is really worn with such small mileage, then something else may be wrong. Even if it has never been cleaned or lubed, I doubt that it could be worn out already.


2

Road front hubs are 100 mm and 8-10 speed rear hubs are 130 mm. In the case of the Trek 1.1, it's always been spec'd with a 8 speed rear hub, so those wheels should fit on the bike.


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